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Found 595 Collections

 

National Parks Belong to Everyone

I created this collection for families to do together while schools are closed. I will be making a collection a day while we are out of school. Today we will be exploring our National Parks. The idea is for families to look at the items in the collection and consider what they see in the objects and paintings, what they think, and what they wonder. Families can also watch videos about the parks as well as listen to the sounds recorded at the parks. At the end of the collection I have provided a few ideas for families about what to do next.

If you want to learn more about more about See Think Wonder you can click here to see a video of a teacher using the routine in her classroom.

Ellen Rogers
28
 

Planting earth day everyday

Intro to plants

debra sparrow
10
 

Subject: Farm Animals

#nmahphc

This is an assortment of photographs depicting farm animals from the Photographic History Collection.

For additional images, search collections.si.edu.

Keywords: farm animals, herd, flock, oxen, steer, cow, horse, pig, chicken, duck, donkey, sheep, ranch, farmyard, dairy farm, chicken coop, dovecote, plowing, farming

Keywords: real photo postcard, documentary photography, press photography

NMAH Photographic History Collection
83
 

I Speak for the Trees!

I created this collection for families to do together while schools are closed. I will be making a collection a day while we are out of school. Today we will be exploring trees. The idea is for families to look at the items in the collection and consider what they see in the objects and paintings, what they think, and what they wonder. Families can also watch a PBS video about trees as well as learn about how animals interact with trees. At the end of the collection I have provided a few ideas for families about what to do next.

If you want to learn more about more about See Think Wonder you can click here to see a video of a teacher using the routine in her classroom.

Ellen Rogers
35
 

Planting for Earth Day

Intro to the study of Plant Growth and Earth Day

amber karichner
12
 

Mayor Myers-Design A City!

Follow the steps to design a streetscape. 

Alyssa Myers
19
 

The Iñupiaq People and Their Culture

By Beverly Faye Hugo (Iñupiaq), 2009

(This is shortened version of a longer essay from the Smithsonian book Living Our Cultures, Sharing Our Heritage: The First Peoples of Alaska.)

Sea, Land, Rivers

There’s ice and snow, the ocean and darkness – darkness in the winter and twenty-four hours of daylight in the summer. Barrow was originally called Utqiaġvik (meaning, “the place where ukpik, the snowy owl, nests”). That’s where my people, the Iñupiat, have survived and lived, and I am doing as they have done. On the Arctic coast you can see vast distances in all directions, out over the ocean and across the land. The country is very flat, with thousands of ponds and lakes, stretching all the way to the Brooks Range in the south. It is often windy, and there are no natural windbreaks, no trees, only shrubs. Beautiful flowers grow during the brief summer season. The ocean is our garden, where we hunt the sea mammals that sustain us. Throughout the year some seasonal activity is going on. We are whaling in the spring and fall, when the bowheads migrate past Barrow, going out for seals and walrus, fishing, or hunting on the land for caribou, geese, and ducks.

Whaling crews are made up of family members and relatives, and everyone takes part. The spring is an exciting time when the whole community is focused on the whales, hoping to catch one. The number we are permitted to take each year is set by the Alaska Eskimo Whaling Commission and the International Whaling Commission. Whaling is not for the faint of heart. It can be dangerous and takes an incredible amount of effort – getting ready, waiting for the whales, striking and pulling and towing them. But the men go out and do it because they want to feed the community. Everyone has to work hard throughout the whaling season. People who aren’t able to go out on the ice help in other ways, such as buying supplies and gas or preparing food. You have to make clothing for them; they need warm parkas, boots, and snow pants.

We believe that a whale gives itself to a captain and crew who are worthy people, who have integrity – that is the gift of the whale. Caring for whales, even after you’ve caught them, is important. After a whale is caught and divided up, everyone can glean meat from the bones. Each gets his share, even those who don’t belong to a crew. No one is left out.

We are really noticing the effects of global warming. The shorefast ice is much thinner in spring than it used to be, and in a strong wind it will sometimes break away. If you are out on the ice, you have to be extremely conscious of changes in the wind and current so that you will not be carried off on a broken floe. We are concerned as well about the effects of offshore drilling and seismic testing by the oil companies. They try to work with the community to avoid problems, but those activities could frighten the whales and be detrimental to hunting.

 

Community and Family

Iñupiaq residents of Barrow, Wales, Point Hope, Wainwright, and other coastal communities, are the Taġiuqmiut, “people of the salt.” People who live in the interior are the Nunamiut, “people of the land.” The Nunamiut used to be nomadic, moving from camp to camp with their dog teams, hunting and fishing to take care of their families. They packed light and lived in skin tents, tracking the caribou and mountain sheep. My husband, Patrick Hugo, was one of them. For the first six years of his life his family traveled like that, but when the government built a school at Anaktuvuk Pass in 1959 they settled there.

My parents, Charlie and Mary Edwardson, were my foremost educators. They taught me my life skills and language. When I came to awareness as a young child, all the people who took care of me spoke Iñupiaq, so that was my first language. Our father would trap and hunt. We never went hungry and had the best furs for our parkas. Our mother was a fine seamstress, and we learned to sew by helping her. My mother and grandmother taught us to how to care for a family and to do things in a spirit of cooperation and harmony.

I was a child during the Bureau of Indian Affairs era, when we were punished for speaking Iñupiaq in school. My first day in class was the saddest one of my young life. I had to learn English, and that was important, but my own language is something that I value dearly and have always guarded. It is a gift from my parents and ancestors, and I want to pass it on to my children and grandchildren and anyone who wants to learn.

 

Ceremony and Celebration

Nalukataq (blanket toss) is a time of celebration when spring whaling has been successful. It is a kind of all-day picnic. People visit with friends and family at the windbreaks that the crews set up by tipping the whale boats onto their sides. At noon they serve niġliq (goose) soup, dinner rolls, and tea. At around 3:00 P.M. we have mikigaq, made of fermented whale meat, tongue, and skin. At 5:00 they serve frozen maktak (whale skin and blubber) and quaq (raw frozen fish). It’s wonderful to enjoy these foods, to talk, and catch up with everyone at the end of the busy whaling season.

Kivgik, the Messenger Feast, was held in the qargi (ceremonial house). The umialgich (whaling captains) in one community sent messengers to the leaders of another, inviting them and their families to come for days of feasting, dances, and gift giving. They exchanged great quantities of valuable things – piles of furs, sealskins filled with oil, weapons, boats, and sleds. That took place until the early years of the twentieth century, when Presbyterian missionaries suppressed our traditional ceremonies, and many of the communal qargich in the villages were closed down.

In 1988, Mayor George Ahmaogak Sr. thought it was important to revitalize some of the traditions from before the Christian era, and Kivgik was started again. Today it is held in the high school gymnasium. People come to Barrow from many different communities to take part in the dancing and maġgalak, the exchange of gifts. You give presents to people who may have helped you or to those whom you want to honor.  Kivgiq brings us together as one people, just as it did in the time of our ancestors.

Tags: Iñupiaq, Inupiaq, Alaska Native, Indigenous, Smithsonian Arctic Studies Center in Alaska, whale, whaling, human geography

Smithsonian Arctic Studies Center in Alaska
20
 

Formats and Processes: Press Prints

#nmahphc

This is an assortment of press prints from a larger collection in the Photographic History Collection at the National Museum of American History.  Press prints were distributed from news agencies, such as AP, UPI, Acme, OWI, and the Signal Corp, to newspapers for print publication. Many of the images have paper captions attached or have captions printed on the verso (back of the photograph). The captions may offer image, event, photographer, date, and other information such as when and where the photograph was printed. [Use suggestion, click on the image and follow link to "more info" to see if the verso has been photographed.]

The image content of press prints is wide ranging including breaking news, parades, celebrities, travel photography, crisis reporting, protests and marches, police activity, information distribution, and more.

For additional images, search collections.si.edu.

Keywords: visual culture, photojournalism, press photography, world events, national history, refugees, victims, honor, award, parade, march, protest, agriculture, industry, farmers, home building, maps, travel photography, portraiture, grief, war photography, horse racing, sports, fans

In the Learning Lab, for head shots and press prints related to entertainment, see Theatre and Movie Stills. There may be additional press prints included in the Learning Lab collection, Protests, Marches, and Reform

NMAH Photographic History Collection
154
 

Format and Process: View-Master

#nmahphc

This is a small sampling of reels and viewers related to View-Masters that are included in the Photographic History Collection. The objects in the assortment included in the Learning Lab are commercial and personal. 

For additional materials, search collections.si.edu.

Keywords: stereo viewers, toy viewers, reels, entertainment

View-Masters were introduced in 1939 at the World's Fair by GAF, there are examples of these, a projector used for Sunday School lessons, and equipment used to make personal reels in the Photographic History Collection. 


NMAH Photographic History Collection
20
 

Our Big Blue World

I created this collection for families to do together while schools are closed. I will be making a collection a day while we are out of school. Today we will be exploring our Oceans. The idea is for families to look at the items in the collection and consider what they see in the objects and paintings, what they think, and what they wonder. Families can also watch a free Brainpop video about ocean life as well as videos to learn about scientists studying coral reefs. At the end of the collection I have provided a few ideas for families about what to do next.

If you want to learn more about more about See Think Wonder you can click here to see a video of a teacher using the routine in her classroom.

Ellen Rogers
41
 

Cameras and Apparatus: Leica Cameras

#nmahphc

This is a selection of Leica cameras from Photographic History Collection (PHC) at the National Museum of American History (NMAH). The PHC holds  has a significant collection of Leica cameras, lenses, and accessories totaling more than 200 items including over 25 cameras from the 1920s to the 2000s. This Learning Lab collection includes a pdf finding aid for Leica cameras.  Included in the PHC are cameras used by photojournalists Carl Mydans and J. Ross Baughman.

For additional collections, search collections.si.edu.

Keywords: Leica, Barnack, 35mm, photography, camera

From the finding aid written by Anthony Brooks:
Leica Cameras have a unique position in the history of 35mm film photography. The Leica was not the first still camera taking 35mm film. It was not even the first commercially successful 35mm camera, but it set the gold standard for all other 35mm cameras and turned 35mm cameras from toys into serious professional tools.

The 35mm film gauge was first introduced in 1892 by Kodak for use by Thomas Edison to make movie films. Edison quickly settled on a standard frame size (18 x 24mm) with four sprocket holes per frame. This movie standard has remained unchanged. The growth of the movie industry in the early twentieth century required large quantities of 35mm film. 1000 feet of 35mm movie film creates less than 20 minutes of movie images. Soon there was interest in using this film for still photography and after 1910, the first 35mm cameras appeared. Most of the early 35mm camera designs used the single frame 18x24mm format and many used lengths of film capable of taking a hundred or more exposures. The quality of photographs from this small format was often disappointing and the number of exposures was a deterrent to amateur photographers. A contemporary small Kodak vest pocket camera took larger negatives on an eight exposure roll and produced better quality prints. The majority of early 35mm cameras were not commercially successful and are rare today. One exception was the American made Ansco Memo introduced in 1926 that for a few years had a dedicated following. However, the introduction of the Leica 35mm camera was to dramatically change the status of 35mm photography. 

The Leica was designed by Oscar Barnack, an employee of the Leitz Optical Company based in Wetzlar, Germany. Barnack may have conceived the first Leica for test exposures in the 18x24mm single frame format. Test exposures were often taken to check the lighting set-up for movies and portraits. However, at some point Barnack decided to design a 35mm camera for photography in its own right. In order to improve
image quality Barnack used two single frames and thus the standard 35mm film frame was born. The PHC contains many significant items that represent the history of Leica cameras.



NMAH Photographic History Collection
18
 

Four Eyes are Better Than One

I created this collection for families to do together while schools are closed. I will be making a collection a day while we are out of school. Today we will be exploring our eyes. The idea is for families to look at the items in the collection and consider what they see in the objects and paintings, what they think, and what they wonder. Families can also watch a free Brainpop video about our eyes as well as learn about animal vision. At the end of the collection I have provided a few ideas for families about what to do next.

If you want to learn more about more about See Think Wonder you can click here to see a video of a teacher using the routine in her classroom.

Ellen Rogers
48
 

Design It Yourself: Design a Watch

Follow along to design a watch inspired by Patricia Moore, 2019 National Design Award winner for Design Mind.

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
15
 

Access Series: Flying Things

This topical collection of airplanes, hot air balloons, space craft, and other things that fly, was originally used in a collage art activity (printed out; using paper, glue, and art materials). It was used as a discussion prompt in an informal learning activity with a group of teens with cognitive disabilities during a summer camp program--as pre-museum visit preparation to artifacts that would be found at an airplane museum. Other suggested uses beyond collage and discussion prompts would be a writing exercise, "If you could fly anywhere, where would you go and what would you do?" Use the visible thinking routine, "See|Think|Wonder" as a starting point for the writing prompt, and the images for inspiration.

Tags: decision-making, self-determination, student empowerment, disability, all access digital arts program

Tracie Spinale
93
 

The Chemistry of Spacesuit Materials

This collection explores the different textiles, along with their chemical compositions, used in the construction of Apollo-era spacesuits.

#MCteach

Virginia Miller
30
 

Rocket Chemistry: A Ride to Space

This collection explores the rockets NASA used during the Apollo and Space Shuttle programs, as well as some novel designs and propellants for use in future rocket systems.

#MCteach

Virginia Miller
21
 

Heat Shields - Keeping It Cool

This collection explores the function and chemistry of heat shields on spacecraft and their evolution over the years.

#MCteach

Virginia Miller
17
 

Spacesuits: Working Under Pressure

A collection of articles, images and videos about the function and necessary components of a spacesuit.

#MCteach

Virginia Miller
19
 

EVs and Climate Change

A simple image that encompasses a deeper meaning. Plug-in electric vehicles (also known as electric cars or EVs) can help keep our city clean. Research has shown that EVs produce fewer emissions that contribute to climate change and smog than conventional vehicles.

Sowbhagyalakshmi Areke
2
 

Volcano Eruptions

Objectives - 


  • Learn that active volcanoes erupt 
  • Discover that volcanoes erupt when pressure builds up 
  • Experiment with eruptions 
  • Learn that some mountains are volcanoes


Meredith Osborne
22
 

A Celebration of African Americans at NASA

The National Museum of African American History and Culture welcomes you to learn about African American STEM contributions at NASA. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) became an official government agency in 1958, born from its predecessor, the National Advisory Council for Aeronautics (NACA).

In 1961, NASA selected its first African American astronaut candidate by the name of Edward Dwight Jr. Although he never flew in space, his selection as an astronaut candidate was a public display to integrate the space agency. Until then, NASA only had white male astronauts flying even though African American scientists, mathematicians, and engineers had been working for the agency for more than a decade.

Finally in 1981, Guion Bluford became the first African American to fly in space. Since then African Americans have continued to fill positions at NASA and make their contributions in space, from behind a desk, and in the laboratory.

This Learning Lab celebrates these individuals, their bravery, their exploratory spirit, and their desires to express themselves fully through their commitment to space exploration.

This is a celebration of them all.


Keywords: NASA, NMAAHC, NASM,  Astronaut, African American, Scientist, Engineer, Mathematician, Technology, Space, Space Travel

National Museum of African American History and Culture
44
 

G is for Victory

I created this collection for families to do together while schools are closed. I will be making a collection a day while we are out of school. Today we will be exploring gardens. The idea is for families to look at the items in the collection and consider what they see in the objects and paintings, what they think, and what they wonder. Families can also watch a videos about gardening, learn about victory gardens, learn about seeds, and listen to a Peter Rabbit read aloud. At the end of the collection I have provided a few ideas for families about what to do next.

If you want to learn more about more about See Think Wonder you can click here to see a video of a teacher using the routine in her classroom.

Ellen Rogers
48
 

Photographer: Mintz, Chuck

#nmahphc

This is a collection of photographs by Chuck Mintz from his Lustron Stories and Hardware Store series. Mintz uses a large format camera.

Copyright Chuck Mintz.

For more collections, search collections.si.edu

Keywords: pre-fab homes, Lustron, hardware store, lumber store, hunting license, BBQ sauce, interior home view, exterior home view, domestic interior, bedroom, living room, home furnishing, books, interior decoration, backyard, hammer, community service, rural supplies

NMAH Photographic History Collection
22
 

Design It Yourself: Design a Streetscape

Follow the steps to design a streetscape. 

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
12
121-144 of 595 Collections