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Found 1,439 Collections

 

How Did We Get Here?: Introduction to Flying Machines

This is a  collection designed to introduce students to the history of aviation as told through the lens of the scientific method-design process. Students begin by thinking about why is flight important in our lives, and how did we get to the airplanes we now know? Students look at the many designs that planes have gone through, and discuss why perseverance and problem-solving are important skills to have. They also see that teamwork, cooperation, and a desire to succeed were necessary for the Wright Brothers to do their important work. Feel free to pick and choose from the resources in creating your own collections:


Overall Learning Outcomes:

  • Scientists use trial and error to form conclusions.
  • Scientists test hypotheses using multiple trials in order to get accurate results and form strong conclusions. 
  • Scientists use multiple data and other evidence to  form strong conclusions about a topic.
  • Scientists work together to apply scientific research and knowledge to create new designs that meet human needs. 
  • Scientists help each other persevere through mistakes to learn new ideas.

Guiding Questions for Students to Answer from this collection:

  • Why is flight important?
  • How do scientists solve problems?
  • How do scientists collect data to help them solve problems?



#LearnwithTR

Katherine Dunn
8
 

Mosquito! Podcasting Module

In this modular, multi-part lesson, learners will focus on a Sidedoor podcast discussing mosquitoes. Learners will focus on the content the podcast is delivering and then analyze the podcast for production techniques. The content of the podcast will give the team a base understanding for the focus of their own podcast.

#YAGSidedoor2019

Sidedoor for Educators
7
 

Pocahontas: The American Myth

In this collection students will explore the American Myth of Pocahontas. They will analyze the way the myth is often told in media today and some of the often contradictory truths that historians and anthropologists have discovered.

Guiding Question: What do we really know about Jamestown and how do we know it?

#learnwithTR

Elizabeth Weiss
11
 

Grace Hopper & The First Computer Bug

A collection about Grace Hopper to use with teaching about historic and inspiring women figures in Computer Science. 

macbetthh
6
 

History and Portraiture: Utilizing Art to Teach American History, Colonial America to the Civil War

This Learning Lab contains a five unit curriculum that puts students in conversation with a diverse group of significant Americans from the colonial era to the present. Lessons on the Elements of Portrayal, Symbols, Labels, Letter Writing, and Portrait Pairing prompt students to analyze the lasting impact of remarkable individuals from the Portrait Gallery’s collection. This collection was originally created in collaboration with Alice Deal Middle School in Washington D.C. 

#NPGteach

Briana White
84
 

"Diary: December 12, 1941," internment in America, and the literature of exile

Beginning with Roger Shimomura's "Diary: December 12, 1941," students will engage with a variety of primary and secondary documents, works of art, and interviews as an entry point into Mohsin Hamid's contemporary work of magical realism, Exit, West.  

Aerie Treska
28
 

Shimomura's "Diary 12, 1941​​"

Analyzing Roger Shimomura's painting "Diary 12, 1941" and understanding Japanese American internment

#SAAMteach 

Laura Magno
23
 

Project Zero Thinking Routines

This introductory collection includes the Understanding Map and several of Harvard University’s Project Zero routines. Workshop participants will select a routine(s) based on the type of thinking and understanding they are trying to encourage. The routine(s) can be paired with museum resource(s) (visuals, audio, texts) that (1) align to a topic or theme that will be taught this semester and (2) provide engaging stimuli to prompt discussion. 

#SAAMTeach

Leslie Schaffer
43
 

Secretary Henry - Castle Stories

This collection supplements a brief description of Secretary Henry's relationship to the Smithsonian Institution Building (Castle) mailed to Friends of the Smithsonian members FY 2020. 

Colleen Morith
11
 

Who am I?

Choose at least three items (image, audio, video) that tell something about you; who you are as a person, what you think is important, how you want others to “see” you.  Make sure you caption your items with your first and last name and an explanation (1-2 sentences).

Charla Floyd
3
 

The Industrial Revolution, changes in consumerism, labor and community.

This lesson will examine how innovation in the distribution of food had a lasting effect on the consumer, the worker and the community.

Students will be invited to study Ralph Fasanella's Iceman Crucified. They will start  by examining the painting with the VTS method: What’s going on in this picture?, What do you see that makes you say that? and What more can we find?

Students will then be introduced to our set of supporting documents. At the conclusion of studying these sources we will revisit Iceman Crucified using the Step Inside: Perceive, Know about, Care about. This will include questions: What can the person or thing perceive? What might the person or thing know about or believe? What might the person or thing care about?

Students will end with a creative assignment that will ask them to give a Eulogy on the iceman

RONALD MAGNUSSON
6
 

Skin color and Race

What is the connection between skin color and race? Historically, science and genetics have been used to support racist world views, yet we know there is no scientific evidence to determine race. This collection uses the painting “Black & White” by Glenn Ligon and Byron Kim and the Project Zero thinking routine “See, Think, Wonder” that has been adapted, making it “See, Wonder, Connect”. Students should not be told of the background of the painting ahead of time, but this can be revealed once they have completed the thinking routine 

Additionally, the collection includes a TedTalk by Angélica Dass called “The Beauty of Human Skin in Every Color”, which students will watch next. “We still live in a world where the color of our skin not only gives a first impression, but a lasting one,” says artist Angélica Dass. She is from Brazil, and her family is “full of colors.” She describes her father’s skin as “deep chocolate.” He was adopted by her grandmother, whose skin is “porcelain,” and her grandfather, whose skin is “somewhere between vanilla and strawberry.” Her mom is “cinnamon.” Her sisters are more “toasted peanut.” (https://blog.ted.com/angelica-dass-reveals-her-art-at-ted2016/). Students should watch the talk and answer a few questions. While these can be done in small groups or as a class, due to the nature of the questions it may be best to allow students time to reflect individually and perhaps share out using a quiet thinking routine called ‘Chalk Talk’. This routine allows students to move around the room, recording responses on large poster paper or a board without needing to use their name. Students can then rotate through, reading the responses of others. If the teacher wants, comments or questions could be added in a non-verbal discussion through interacting on poster paper.

An optional set of extension discussion questions has been provided, but these are suitable for older students. Also, as an additional resource, a link to Byron Kim’s “Synecdoche” at the National Gallery of Art and the Washington Post article about the piece has been included. Students could engage with this work as an extension or look at both pieces side by side in a comparison before any final class reflection. 

Then students will finish by using the Project Zero thinking routine “The Three Y’s” as a reflection. 

Connection with genetics:

From an evolutionary perspective, skin color evolved as a mechanism to protect against UV radiation. UV radiation stimulates skin cells to produce melanin, a pigment that can be found in skin, hair and eyes. People living closer to the equator experience a greater exposure to UV A and UV B radiation and therefore need more protection from the sun – hence, more melanin and darker pigmentation. People living in areas farther away from the equator experience less exposure and need far less melanin to protect, so have lighter skin tones.  Skin color is an example of a polygenic trait, a characteristic that is controlled by more than one gene, which allows for continuous variation depending on what collection of genes are inherited from parents. If this collection is used within a genetics unit where students learn about these kinds of genes, then students may already have some previous knowledge about the subject. If more information about the science of skin color is needed, I have included a TedTalk by Nina Jablonski entitled “Skin Color is an Illusion” within the collection. Also, more information about the science of skin color can be found in the Discover Magazine article provided. 

Advances in genetics have proven that we are all very closely related and differ in our genes by only a very small percent (0.1% on average). With this in mind, we must consider why daily rhetoric continues to perpetuate racist ideas. This collection can be used in several classroom settings, including: Biology (genetics or human evolution unit), Human Anatomy, History (when studying slavery, apartheid or colonialism in general), or Theory of Knowledge (when exploring the Natural Sciences Area of Knowledge, language as a way of knowing, or making knowledge claims about evidence). 

Emily Veres
11
 

Snapshots & Social Change: A Collection of Photographs by Elizabeth Howe Bliss

A collection of photographic prints made between 1915 and 1919 by a social worker named Elizabeth Howe Bliss. She traveled to the American South on behalf of the National Child Labor Committee, writing reports and documenting through photographs child laborers and their challenges accessing education. She also utilized her camera in New York City and in the French department of the Somme during WWI. These images currently reside within the Photographic History Collection at the National Museum of American History: Kenneth E. Behring Center, Smithsonian Institution. 
[This collection is presently under construction as content is being added.]

Kate Fogle
6
 

Ruth Law: Breaking Barriers in Aviation and the War Effort

This topical collection of resources and analysis strategies can be used as a brainstorming tool to support student research on the National History Day (#NHD) 2020 theme of  "Breaking Barriers in History". This collection focuses on primary and secondary sources on the accomplishments and contributions of aviator, Ruth Law. 

#BecauseOfHerStory #NHD #NHD2020

Tags: Ruth Bancroft Law Oliver, aviator, world records, flight, military, World War I, women's history

Ashley Naranjo
36
 

Water Around Us

Take a moment and look at each piece of work. What is each body of water purpose or is their a purpose. After pick two pieces to compare. Create a journal entry using I see, I think, I wonder of the two pieces. After write the reasoning behind each piece you chose. 


Riley Golder
11
 

Adding the A to STEM: Integrating Portraiture into STEAM/STEM Subjects

This Learning Lab demonstrates how portraiture can be used as an interdisciplinary springboard for lessons in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM). Portraits of STEM pertinent sitters provide a jumping-in point for students, visually grounding them in a subject. In this way, portraiture functions as an interdisciplinary tool to engage students and enrich their learning across curriculum. 

#NPGteach

Briana White
308
 

East Asian Numismatics in 3D!

The Smithsonian's National Numismatic Collection (NNC) is America's collection of monetary and transactional objects. This diverse and expansive global collection contains objects that represent every inhabited continent and span more than 3,000 years of human history. The NNC holds an expansive collection of East Asian coins with notable objects from China, Korea, and Japan. Indeed, many of the earliest donations to the Smithsonian in the 19th century were East Asian coins and paper currencies. They include a set of coins and medals gifted to President Ulysses S. Grant by the Japanese Meiji Emperor during Grant’s world tour. Grant’s widow, Julia Dent Grant, donated the unique gift to the museum in 1886. Shortly after, the estate of collector George Bunker Glover bequeathed more than 2,025 pieces of East Asian currency to the Smithsonian. Growth of the NNC’s East Asian collection continued in the 20th century with significant donations from The Chase Manhattan Money Museum,  the descendants of collector Alexander I. Pogrebetsky, and the estate of collector Josiah K. Lilly Jr. Today the NNC continues to grow its East Asian holdings. In 2017 the NNC received 473 objects from the Howard F. Bowker Collection. Thanks to the generous support of the Howard F. Bowker Family, Michael Chou, and the Smithsonian’s 3D Program, the NNC’s East Asian holdings are accessible online, with a selection available in 3D!


Emily Pearce Seigerman
10
 

Formosa

Emily Pearce Seigerman
42
 

Voices and Votes - Faces of Change in American Democracy

Description: 

This learning lab introduces students to individuals who have shaped and participated in American democracy over time. Using a variety of resources, take in the stories and impact of Thomas Jefferson, Molly Pitcher, Thomas Paine, Richard Allen, William Apess, Wong Chin Foo, Alice Paul, Ella Baker, and Dolores Huerta.

Voices and Votes: Democracy in America is an exhibition from Museum on Main Street traveling to rural American from 2020-2025. Voices and Votes is based on the exhibition American Democracy: A Great Leap of Faith at the National Museum of American History. This learning lab can be used in conjunction with the exhibition or as a stand alone resource on the history of democracy.

Visit Smithsonian History Explorer to learn more!  

#historicalthinking

Guiding Questions:

Who has influenced American democracy? Why did they participate in American democracy and what did they achieve? Have these people changed over time?

How have social movements changed American democracy throughout history?

How can individuals or groups take action to participate in American democracy?

What issues at a local, state, or national level affect your life? Can your participation in American democracy resolve those issues?

Who is participating in and influencing national, state, or local conversations about  American democracy today? Who would you add to this list?

SITES Museum on Main Street
49
 

Shimomura's

Analyzing Roger Shimomura's painting "Diary 12, 1941" and understanding Japanese American internment

#SAAMteach 

Karen McClinchey
23
 

God of Small Things: Forbidden Love (Launch)

Big Idea: "They all broke the rules. They all crossed into forbidden territory. They all tampered with the laws that lay down who should be loved and how. And how much."

Annette Spahr
4
 

Voices and Votes - Power of the Press

The press and media have influenced America even before it was a country. The goal of this learning lab is to show the effect media has played on our democracy. It is also important to understand the bias that media and press can have on us everyday. Realizing this influence can make all of us better citizens.

SITES Museum on Main Street
22
 

Pictographs

Native American Pictographs
Connie Grimes
3
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