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Found 14,182 Resources

A Chance to Hear Abraham Lincoln's Pocket Watch Tick Again

Smithsonian Channel
In this short film, artist Maira Kalman walks us through an exhibition she's curating for Cooper Hewitt. In the process, she and composer Nico Muhly bring Abraham Lincoln's timepiece to life. From: MAIRA KALMAN: MY FAVORITE THINGS http://bit.ly/1zye2qE

What the Real Watson and Holmes Did for a Living

Smithsonian Channel
Edwin Holmes, a burglar alarm pioneer, and Thomas Watson, an electrician who worked for Alexander Graham Bell, decided to join forces in 1878. Not to solve mysteries, but to form the Bell Telephone Company. From: MY MILLION DOLLAR INVENTION: Criminal Riches http://bit.ly/1BMtAJV

These Young Dingo Pups Are Ready for a Real Meal (4K)

Smithsonian Channel
After about seven weeks of suckling milk from their mom, dingo puppies are ready to take the next step. It's the parents' job to teach them how to forage for little snacks like caterpillars and beetles. From the Series: Secrets of Wild Australia: The Dingo http://bit.ly/2t9Wl7C

The Deadliest Natural Disaster in U.S. History

Smithsonian Channel
Despite gale force winds and over a foot of water flooding the streets, the businessmen of Galveston, Texas, gathered for a lively bite at Ritter's Saloon and Cafe. It did not end well. From: PERFECT STORMS: The Great Galveston Hurricane http://bit.ly/1sFqWH9

This South American Frog is Deadly to the Touch

Smithsonian Channel
A single drop of the toxin coating the skin of a female golden dart frog can stop a human heart. But today, she's interested in a different kind of heart-stopping action - she's looking for a mate. From the Series: Into the Wild Colombia: Romeo and Julieta http://bit.ly/2PjbSML

Putting a Disposable Vietnam-Era Rocket Launcher to the Test

Smithsonian Channel
A Vietnam veteran introduces Weapon Hunter host Paul Shull to the M72 LAW shoulder-fired rocket launcher--a single-use weapon that can penetrate armor as thick as seven inches. From: THE WEAPON HUNTER: Vietnam Road Warrior http://bit.ly/2kHALlO

Why Black Leopards Need Distractions

Smithsonian Channel
Along the edge of the 44,000-acre Denikan Reserve, two black leopards will make their way to their newly built enclosure. These expert climbers won't be able to scale the specially built fences that border their sanctuary, but luckily they have plenty of stimuli to keep them from growing bored. From the Series: Predator Roadtrip: Hyena Breakout

This State Produces 270 Million Pounds of Popcorn Per Year

Smithsonian Channel
A large portion of Indiana's economy relies on an invaluable crop: corn. Popcorn plants like Pop Weaver have perfected the production of our favorite movie snack down to a science. From: AERIAL AMERICA: Indiana http://bit.ly/1Qr225b

The Spectacular Emergence of a Cairns Birdwing Butterfly (4K)

Smithsonian Channel
The arrival of a Cairns birdwing butterfly from its chrysalis is one of the most extraordinary and awe-inspiring sights in nature. From the Series: Secrets of Wild Australia: Bugs and Butterflies http://bit.ly/2t9Wl7C

How Engineers Remove Unwanted Sounds from Camaros

Smithsonian Channel
With the Camaro, the sound engineers at Chevrolet have to satisfy two opposing teams: officials concerned about noise levels, and the diehard fans who want the Camaro to sound...well, like a Camaro. From the Series: Supercar Superbuild: Chevy Camaro http://bit.ly/2sBLFBi

The Lizard's Tale 102: Does Evolution Repeat Itself?

Smithsonian Channel
Cuba, Hispaniola, Jamaica and Puerto Rico: the four big islands of the Caribbean, are hotbeds of anole activity. But what’s striking is the physical parallels you see between the anoles living on different islands – a phenomenon known as ecomorphism. But did these ecomorphs evolve first and then spread out to the different islands – or did they evolve separately, and then move? A battery of physical and DNA tests help point us toward a conclusive answer – and bring scientists one step closer to understanding the great mysteries of evolution.

Nature's Ultimate Ambush

Smithsonian Channel
When thousands of wildebeest and zebras make their way across the Mara River, it's a feeding frenzy for the river's ravenous crocodiles. From: BLOOD RIVER CROSSING http://bit.ly/1fEakcH

The Amazing Rise of Parliament's First Female Member

Smithsonian Channel
When Nancy Astor's husband gave up his seat in British parliament, she decided to run in his place. Her victory immortalized her as the first woman to hold a seat in parliament. From: MILLION DOLLAR AMERICAN PRINCESSES http://bit.ly/1OPPx3j

This Photograph Could Be Older Than the Camera Obscura

Smithsonian Channel
Art Historian Nicholas Allen has a radical theory about the image on the Shroud of Turin; he believes it was the world's first photograph, taken 500 years before the known invention of photography. From: SECRETS: The Turin Shroud http://bit.ly/UyEDGV

Your Baby Stroller Was Designed by This Aerospace Engineer

Smithsonian Channel
Owen Maclaren was one of the design engineers of the WWII Spitfire fighter plane. In the 1960s, he applied his knowledge to a very different field: baby buggies. From: MY MILLION DOLLAR INVENTION: Need for Speed http://bit.ly/1HvBEH5

Cleaning Up Costa Concordia's 180,000-Ton Ruins

Smithsonian Channel
When a shipwreck the size of the Costa Concordia needs to be removed, experts turn to a process called parbuckling: rolling it underwater with hydraulics, then carefully towing it away. From: CRUISE SHIP DOWN: SAVING CONCORDIA http://bit.ly/1Qn4lX9

Shocking Event Ensues When Wolves Surround Biologist

Smithsonian Channel
At home in the Alps, surrounded by those she loves, Gudrun reflects on her journey from field biologist, to cancer survivor, to mother. From the Show: Running With Wolves http://bit.ly/2yK6z3G

The Secret Is in the Space Suit

Smithsonian Channel
When Neil Armstrong's space gloves began to develop mysterious spots on the cuff, Smithsonian specialists took a closer look, and what they found was surprising. From: PLANES, CRANES AND ROCKETS http://bit.ly/1lBQWJh

This Colorful Parrot Lives Inside the Trunk of These Trees (4K)

Smithsonian Channel
At over three feet long, the hyacinth macaw is the largest species of parrot in the world. Despite this, its nest is actually located not on a tree, but inside one. From the Series: Brazil Untamed: Bird Paradise http://bit.ly/2Z9QCxp

These Guys Invented New Orleans Funk

Smithsonian Channel
In 1998, Dr. John hosted a musical family reunion in New Orleans, where 63 musicians gathered to celebrate life and art at the former house of Louis Armstrong. From: ROCKING THE OPERA HOUSE: DR. JOHN http://bit.ly/1s1rG50

How Grooming Plays a Role in Helping Baboons Reproduce (4K)

Smithsonian Channel
Grooming is an important function in baboon society that calms nerves and enhances group cohesion. In addition, it also plays a part in reducing stress among baboon females - which leads to healthy reproduction. From the Series: Land of Primates: The Geladas of Ethiopia http://bit.ly/2XtGOxG

Why You Can't Trust Medieval Portraits of King Richard

Smithsonian Channel
Distorted and altered, a well-known portrait of King Richard may be the work of Tudor painters intent on emphasizing the King's bad side. From: THE KING'S SKELETON: RICHARD III REVEALED http://bit.ly/1nDCBBt

A Look Inside the Iconic Mercedes-Benz 300SL

Smithsonian Channel
Take a look inside and test drive what is arguably the first supercar. From: THE SUPERCAR STORY http://bit.ly/1pmZloH

Rovers Give Hope to Mars Colonization Success

Smithsonian Channel
Space rovers can see more detailed information and travel further than humans. With all the work they're doing on the planet Mars, it's hard not to become attached to the little guys From: SMITHSONIAN SPOTLIGHT: Space: Bots or Bodies http://bit.ly/1rw2MMW
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