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Skin & Bones - Animal Life: Brown Kiwi

National Museum of Natural History
Brown Kiwis are flightless birds adapted to life on the ground and underground. They are endowed with a super-acute sense of smell, which they use to find prey. This video is one of a series taken from the mobile app Skin & Bones. The app brings animal skeletons to life through 3D imagery in the Bone Hall at the Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History. Download on the App Store and enjoy the videos and 3D experience at the Museum or wherever you are.

Evolutionary Origin of the Turtle Shell

National Museum of Natural History
How did the turtle get its shell? Tyler Lyson, a Peter Buck Postdoctoral Fellow in the Department of Vertebrate Zoology, discusses discoveries related to the evolution of the turtle body plan and the hypotheses regarding how the shell that we see today came about.

Skin & Bones - Animal Life: Mandrill

National Museum of Natural History
Male Mandrills are the largest and most strikingly colored monkeys in the world. These forest dwelling monkeys travel in large troops that can top 800 individuals. This video is one of a series taken from the mobile app Skin & Bones. The app brings animal skeletons to life through 3D imagery in the Bone Hall at the Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History. Download on the App Store and enjoy the videos and 3D experience at the Museum or wherever you are.

St. Lawrence Island Yupik Traditions: Sanightaaq (Ceremonial Gut Parka)

National Museum of Natural History
In 2001, traditional scholars Branson Tungiyan and Estelle Oozevaseuk from St. Lawrence Island traveled to the Smithsonian Institution to share their knowledge about ancestral objects in the museum's collections. These discussions contributed to the Living Our Cultures exhibition at the Arctic Studies Center, hosted by the Anchorage Museum. In 2007, St. Lawrence Island Yupik artist Elaine Kingeekuk provided additional information about objects selected for the exhibition and repaired a ceremonial gut parka in the traditional way, making it ready for exhibition. Join these Alaska Native experts to learn about the ceremonial gut parka now on display in Anchorage until 2017. For more information, go to http://www.mnh.si.edu/arctic/html/alaska.htm. To visit the exhibition website, go to http://alaska.si.edu.

The Athabascan Snowshoe Makers Residency

National Museum of Natural History
In May 2011, the Smithsonian Arctic Studies Center, Alaska State Council on the Arts, and Anchorage Museum hosted a workshop to highlight a key implement of Arctic survival -- the sinew-webbed snowshoe. Koyukon Athabascan master artists George Albert and Butch Yaska built snowshoes in several traditional styles while teaching the intricate construction process to apprentices from their communities. Gwich'in Athabascan culture-bearer Trimble Gilbert discussed the art in his Native language, documenting the rich vocabulary and traditional knowledge that surround this focal item of Athabascan culture. Museum visitors observed the work in progress, and nearly 200 students and teachers from the Anchorage School District took part in educational tours to meet the artists and learn about Athabascan culture. Sponsors for this program included the National Endowment for the Arts and the Smithsonian Institution's Recovering Voices program. For more information, go to http://www.mnh.si.edu/arctic/html/alaska.htm. To visit the exhibition website, go to http://alaska.si.edu.

Skin & Bones - Big Idea: Echolocation (new version)

National Museum of Natural History
Through echolocation some animals emit sounds of different frequencies and loudness that bounce off the objects around them. The echoes are then captured by the ears and the brain figures out how to recognize food and navigate the surroundings from those signals. This video is one of a series taken from the mobile app Skin & Bones. The app brings animal skeletons to life through 3D imagery in the Bone Hall at the Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History. Download on the App Store and enjoy the videos and 3D experience at the Museum or wherever you are.

Secrets of the Fossil Hall

National Museum of Natural History
The fossil hall at the Smithsonian’s national museum of natural history has inspired and awed visitors for generations. While the hall is currently closed for major renovations (opening in 2019) this video highlights some of the fossils specimens, their condition, and their biodiversity and evolution over time.

Map of Shark Protection Through Time

National Museum of Natural History
Sharks face many threats from people, including extreme overfishing driven by high prices for their fins, and being caught by mistake in nets and on longlines. While there is still much work to be done to conserve sharks, take a moment to recognize the work already being done in communities around the world to protect these fascinating and beautiful animals. Video by the Smithsonian Ocean Portal: Amanda Feuerstein, Emily Frost, Nancy Knowlton and Hannah Waters. Special thanks to Sonja Fordham, KerriLynn Miller, Jen Sawada, and David Shiffman. This map is a work in progress. If you know of regulations we’re missing or otherwise want to contribute, email ocean@si.edu Visit the Ocean Portal: http://ocean.si.edu On Facebook: http://facebook.com/OceanPortal On Twitter: http://twitter.com/OceanPortal Source for 10 percent statistic: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1755-263X.2012.00253.x

Skin & Bones - Animal Life: Swordfish

National Museum of Natural History
Swordfishes are ocean predators capable of swimming at high speeds; they use their flattened bill to slash and spear their prey. This video is one of a series taken from the mobile app Skin & Bones. The app brings animal skeletons to life through 3D imagery in the Bone Hall at the Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History. Download on the App Store and enjoy the videos and 3D experience at the Museum or wherever you are.

Les Maçons de Djenné /The Masons of Djenné

National Museum of Natural History
Le film "Les Maçons de Djenné" a été créé pour l'exposition « Mud Masons of Mali » au Musée National d'Histoire Naturelle de l'Institution Smithsonian. Les maçons parlent de l'histoire de leur ville ; de leur métier, et des défis et des transformations culturelles auxquels ils sont confrontés aujourd'hui. Le film est sous-titré en français. The Masons of Djenné is a film created for the exhibition "Mud Masons of Mali" at the Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History. The Djenné masons speak about the history of the city; the building profession, and the challenges and changes they face today. Subtitled in French.

Sharing St. Lawrence Island Yupik Language and Culture

National Museum of Natural History
The Alaska Office of the Smithsonian’s Arctic Studies Center hosted a St. Lawrence Island Yupik language and culture seminar in January 2012, bringing together seven fluent speakers: John Apassingok, Lydia Apatiki, Ralph Apatiki, Sr., Elaine Kingeekuk, Christopher Koonooka, Merlin Koonooka and Angela Larson. They met for five days to discuss Yupik objects in the Smithsonian exhibition Living Our Cultures, Sharing Our Heritage: The First Peoples of Alaska at the Anchorage Museum. The resulting twelve short videos and lessons offer teachers, students, parents and lifelong learners access to Yupik language and lifeways. One of those videos – saguyak (drum) – is presented here. To see all of the videos and lessons, please visit the project microsite at Sharing Knowledge Alaska: http://www.mnh.si.edu/arctic/html/sharing-knowledge-alaska/SharingknowledgeAK_Index.html

Vision in the Deep Sea, a look at the Diverse Eyes of Hyperiid amphipods

National Museum of Natural History
How do hyperiid amphipods see in the deep blue sea? Jamie Baldwin-Fergus discusses her research on these small to medium crustaceans living deep in the pelagic waters.

Early Human Diets with Briana Pobiner

National Museum of Natural History
What did early humans have for dinner a million years ago? Anthropologist Briana Pobiner explores the influence of diet, especially the shift to meat eating, on human evolution. Aired March 27, 2014.

Human Origins: Expanding World of Homo Erectus

National Museum of Natural History
For more on this, visit the Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History's humanorigins.si.edu!

Skin & Bones promotional video

National Museum of Natural History
Skin & Bones brings animal skeletons to life through 3D imagery in the Bone Hall at the Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History. Download on the App Store and enjoy the videos and 3D experience at the Museum or wherever you are.

The Sant Ocean Hall Episode 2- at the Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History

National Museum of Natural History
http://www.mnh.si.edu/ Listen in as Dr. Carole Baldwin, curator of fishes for the Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History in Washington, D.C., answers reader-submitted questions from the popular blog Deep Sea News ranging in topic from sustainable seafood to bioluminescence in fish. The backdrop of the interview is the museum's exciting new Sant Ocean Hall, which Carole helped to develop as a lead scientist. This is the second online edition of "The Scientist Is In," a weekly event that takes place on-site at the Hall. Every Wednesday, visitors have the opportunity to interact with marine scientists who visit the Hall to show off collection specimens and models and talk with visitors about a variety of topics - from their travels to exotic ocean locations to ongoing research and discoveries from the field. Be sure to check out Episode 1 of The Scientist Is In at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NSqOkB-lBho. Dive in to learn more about the Sant Ocean Hall at http://ocean.si.edu.

Today, Tomorrow, Forever

National Museum of Natural History
For more than a century, the National Museum of Natural History has investigated fundamental questions about the natural world and our place in it through its unparalleled research, collections, exhibitions and education programs. Watch the campaign video about where we are going and how you can help. http://tinyurl.com/mnhdonate

Learning Science Across Environments: Museum, Home, and School

National Museum of Natural History
Speaker's Biography: Philip Bell is Associate Professor of the Learning Sciences and the Geda and Phil Condit Professor of Science and Mathematics Education at the University of Washington, Seattle. He studies everyday expertise and cognition in science and health, the design and use of novel learning technologies in science classrooms, children's argumentation, culturally responsive science instruction, the use of emerging digital technologies within youth culture, and new approaches to inquiry instruction in science. Dr. Bell is a member of the NAS Board on Science Education and co-chaired the NRC report Learning Science in Informal Environments.

Cephalopod video: Tremoctopus sp.

National Museum of Natural History
Cruising, with ventral four arms tucked in toward the mouth. Then, it nearly hits the submersible, somersaults dorsally, and jets away. From: Young, R.E. 1995. Aspects of the natural history of pelagic cephalopods of the Hawaiian mesopelagic-boundary region. Pacific Science 49(2): 143-155. Online abstract: http://invertebrates.si.edu/cephs/young92/cephs6.html To see other cephalopod videos: http://collections.si.edu/search/results.htm?fq=online_media_type%3A%22Video+recordings%22&q=&fq=tax_class:%22Cephalopoda%22 [taxonomy:binomial=Tremoctopus sp.]

A Century of Discovery of Sea Urchins and Relatives with Smithsonian Scientist Dr. Dave Pawson

National Museum of Natural History
Meet Dr. Dave Pawson, a zoologist at the National Museum of Natural History. He studies echinoderms, which include animals like sea urchins, sea stars, and sea cucumbers, in the deep sea. During this webcast, which originally aired Nov. 9, 2017, Dr. Pawson shares the rich history of deep-sea exploration and the first echinoderms that were collected for the Smithsonian over 100 years ago by Austin Clark, aboard the research vessel Albatross. As the program continues, Dr. Pawson shares how deep-sea research and exploration tools and techniques have evolved, and shares his own exploration experiences aboard submarines and with remotely operated vehicles (ROVs). This program originally aired as part of the Smithsonian Science How webcast series. Smithsonian Science How brings natural history science and research to middle-school students. For standards alignment and teaching resources to complement this video, visit: https://qrius.si.edu/explore-science/webcast/century-discovery-sea-urchins-and-relatives.

Why Stamps Were Invented

National Postal Museum
This animated video was created in 1993 for the National Postal Museum's Stamps and Stories gallery.

Flattening Folded or Rolled Documents

National Postal Museum
National Postal Museum Preservation Specialist, Manda Kowalczyk, gives instruction on how to safely flatten folded or rolled paper artifacts using a humidification chamber. This treatment should only be performed after the artifact has passed an Ink Solubility Test: https://youtu.be/4ofBvA2c4LA

100 Greatest American Stamps, Janet Klug and Donald Sundman, Maynard Sundman Lecture 2008

National Postal Museum
"100 Greatest American Stamps" presented by Janet Klug and Donald Sundman, The Sixth Annual Maynard Sundman Lecture, February 9, 2008, Smithsonian National Postal Museum. The museum's Maynard Sundman Lecture Series was established in 2002 through a donation by his sons, David and Donald. The Sundman lectures feature talks by authors and expert philatelists on stamps and stamp collecting. View past Sundman lectures here: https://postalmuseum.si.edu/sundman

Collecting History: 125 Years of the National Philatelic Collection and Philatelic Fish Stories

National Postal Museum
Curator of philately Daniel Piazza spoke about the National Postal Museum's newest exhibit, Collecting History: 125 Years of the National Philatelic Collection. Though the National Philatelic Collection contains incredible objects and rare artifacts, there are a few famous examples of the philatelic material that got away. Piazza shared these "philatelic fish stories" as well as described some of the things you *will* find in the collection.
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