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Cherokee Days 2018 - Cherokee Traditional Dances

National Museum of the American Indian
The museum's fifth annual Cherokee Days Festival brings together members from the three federally recognized Cherokee tribes (Cherokee Nation, United Keetoowah Band of Cherokee Indians and the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians) to celebrate and share their culture, history, and arts with the public. In this segment, the Tsa-La-Gi Group of the Eastern Band of Cherokee demonstrate some traditional animal dances of the Cherokee. This performance was webcast live and recorded on April 14, 2018 in the Potomac Atrium of the National Museum of the American Indian.

Hopi Festival 2018: 6 Nygumon Tota — Hopi Corn Grinding Dance

National Museum of the American Indian
For the first festival hosted by the National Museum of the American Indian, the Hopi people shared artist demonstrations, history presentations, and performances of music and dance. In this segment, Hopi dancers and singers demonstrate the Nygumon Tota, or Hopi Corn Grinding Dance. Bruce Talawyma gives insightful remarks about the performance and the meaning and importance of the dance for the Hopi. This performance was webcast and recorded in the museum's Rasmuson Theater on November 18, 2018.

Chikasha Poya: We Are Chickasaw - Injunuity 1

National Museum of the American Indian
Award-winning Injunuity is headed by Brad Clonch of the Choctaw Nation and Chickasaw composer Jeff Carpenter. They bring the traditional Native American flute to their contemporary compositions that draw from popular and Western music traditions. This is the first of two concerts given on the first day of the festival. The festival was webcast from the Potomac Atrium of the National Museum of the American Indian on August 15, 2014.

Native Storytelling: Thirza Defoe

National Museum of the American Indian
Grammy-winning artist, performer, and storyteller Thirza Defoe shares traditional Ojibwe and Oneida stories, not only with words but also with music, song, and dance. You may even get to meet Grandma Quay and hear some of her stories as well!

Hopi Festival 2018: 1 Qaʼ ö — Hopi Corn Dance

National Museum of the American Indian
For the first festival hosted by the National Museum of the American Indian, the Hopi people shared artist demonstrations, history presentations, and performances of music and dance. In this segment, Hopi dancers and singers demonstrate the Qaʼ ö, or Hopi Corn Dance. Bruce Talawyma gives insightful remarks about the performance and the meaning and importance of the dance for the Hopi. This performance was webcast and recorded in the museum's Rasmuson Theater on November 18, 2018.

Cherokee Days 2018 - Western Cherokee History Presentation: Ernestine Berry

National Museum of the American Indian
The museum's fifth annual Cherokee Days Festival brings together members from the three federally recognized Cherokee tribes (Cherokee Nation, United Keetoowah Band of Cherokee Indians and the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians) to celebrate and share their culture, history, and arts with the public. In this lecture, Ernestine Berry gives a history of the Western Cherokees who became known as the Old Settlers when they moved from Arkansas to Indian Territory. This lecture was webcast live and recorded on April 14, 2018 in the Rasmuson Theater of the National Museum of the American Indian.

NNAVM: Presentation of Final Design Proposals 6—Harvey Pratt

National Museum of the American Indian
Harvey Pratt (Cheyenne/Arapaho) and his project partner Hans Butzer present their design proposal. Mr. Pratt, a multimedia artist, retired as the police forensic artist for the Oklahoma State Bureau of Investigation. Mr. Butzer is a partner in the Oklahoma firm Butzer Architects and Urbanism. In 2020, the Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian will dedicate the National Native American Veterans Memorial on the museum's grounds in Washington, D. C. After nearly two years of consultations with Native veterans and tribal communities to develop criteria, the museum held an open design competition. Through a blind process—proposals were identified only by number—a jury of Natives and non-Natives selected five final concepts earlier this year. The Presentation of Final Designs shown in this playlist offered the public the opportunity to hear memorial proposals from each design team and questions and comments from the jurors about each of the designs. In this segment, members of the jury introduce themselves: Mr. Larry Ulaaq Ahvakana (Inupiaq), artist; Ahvakana Fine Art; Ms. Stephanie Birdcall (Cherokee), director, Veteran Affairs, Office of Tribal Government Relations; Dr. Johnnetta Betsch Cole, director emerita, National Museum of African Art, Smithsonian Institution; Mr. Edwin Fountain, general counsel, American Battle Monuments Commission; Mr. Mark Kawika McKeague (Native Hawaiian), director of cultural planning, Group 70 International, Inc.; Mr. Brian McCormack (Nez Perce), principal landscape architect, McCormack Landscape Architecture; Ms. Lillian Pitt (Wasco/Yakima/Warm Springs), artist; Dr. Herman Viola, curator emeritus, Smithsonian Institution; and Mr. Kevin Grover (Pawnee), director of the National Museum of the American Indian (alternate juror). This program was webcast live and recorded in the Rasmuson Theater of the National Museum of the American Indian on June 12, 2018.

Living Aloha Festival 2014: Hālau Ho'omau I ka Wai Ola O Hawai'i

National Museum of the American Indian
The Living Aloha Hawai'i Festival 2014 launches an anniversary year for the the museum, with a rich program of performances. This segment features the music of Manu Ikaika and hula performances by Hālau Ho'omau I ka Wai Ola O Hawai'i. Hālau Ho'omau I ka Wai Ola O Hawai'i, meaning "through hula and halau, we remain young at heart and full of life," is a traditional Hawaiian cultural school organized by Suz and Manu Ikaika. The Halau, established in January 2000, is based at Hope United Church in Alexandria, Virginia. Recorded on the Potomac Atrium of the National Museum of the American Indian on May 17, 2014.

Star Stories: The Girl and Her Seven Brothers

National Museum of the American Indian
This animation tells an Arikara story of the creation of a sacred landmark on the plains, the Bear' Lodge (Devils Tower), as well as the formation of the Pleiades star cluster. It is one of nine traditional Native American stories that are part of the National Museum of the American Indian inaugural exhibition "Our Universes: Traditional Knowledge Shapes Our World," which is on view through April 20, 2019.

Suma Qamaña 2014 Bolivian Festival 18: Saya Afroboliviana

National Museum of the American Indian
Suma Qamaña celebrates the spirit of "Living Well" in this four day festival hosted by the Embassy of the Plurinational State of Bolivia, highlighting the indigenous cultures of Bolivia through dance and song. In this segment, Ballet Somos Bolivia perform the Saya Afroboliviana. Recorded in the Potomac Atrium of the National Museum of the American Indian on June 8, 2014.

Northwest Coast Dance Celebration - Lepquinm Gumilgit Gagoadim 2

National Museum of the American Indian
As part of the museum's Native American Heritage Month Celebration of Northwest Coast Dance, the award-winning multi-generational Tsimshian dancers Lepquinm Gumilgit Gagoadim (Our Own Dance in Our Hearts) share their traditional style of dance. Based in the Anchorage, Alaska area, the group is well-known for their use of humor and theatrical dance to teach about Indigenous lifeways of the Northwest Coast. The group was founded by Marcella McIntyre and Theo Bayou in 2005. This is the second of three performances by Our Own Dance in Our Hearts that was webcast and recorded in the Potomac Atrium of the National Museum of the American Indian on November 24, Thanksgiving day, 2016.

Suma Qamaña 2014 Bolivian Festival 10: Chacarera

National Museum of the American Indian
Suma Qamaña celebrates the spirit of "Living Well" in this four day festival hosted by the Embassy of the Plurinational State of Bolivia, highlighting the indigenous cultures of Bolivia through dance and song. In this segment, Ballet Somos Bolivia perform the Chacarera. The Chacarera is a typical folk dance of Bolivia. Chacarera is danced naturally and spontaneously only in parts of Argentina, and in the south of Bolivia (Tarija) where it borders with Argentina. The dance is traditionally accompanied by the sounds of guitars, violins, and bass. In the last decades of the twentieth century, though, the dance began to incorporate varied instrumental ensembles. Recorded in the Potomac Atrium of the National Museum of the American Indian on June 7, 2014.

Día de los Muertos Festival 2015 - Danza de los Viejitos 2

National Museum of the American Indian
As part of the museum's annual Day of the Dead festival, Grupo los Tecuanes perform La Danza de los Viejitos (Dance of the Ol Men) in the Potomac Atrium. This is the first day of performances by this Mixtec culture organization and took place on November 1, 2015.

Spooky Storytelling for Halloween

National Museum of the American Indian
In the spirit of Halloween, join the museum's Cultural Interpreters for a special storytelling session focused on scary stories told among Native families and friends. BEWARE! These stories may set your hair on end and keep you looking over your shoulder. This webcast comes to you from the museum's family-friendly imagiNATIONS Activity Center.

Cherokee Days 2018 - Storyteller Robert Lewis

National Museum of the American Indian
The museum's fifth annual Cherokee Days Festival brings together members from the three federally recognized Cherokee tribes (Cherokee Nation, United Keetoowah Band of Cherokee Indians and the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians) to celebrate and share their culture, history, and arts with the public. In this segment, Cherokee National Treasure Robert Lewis tells about his youth and traditional Cherokee stories. This performance was webcast live and recorded on April 14, 2018 in the Potomac Atrium of the National Museum of the American Indian.

Hopi Festival 2018: 7 Alternative History of America

National Museum of the American Indian
For the first festival hosted by the National Museum of the American Indian, the Hopi people shared artist demonstrations, history presentations, and performances of music and dance. In this segment, Edward Kabotie gives a Alternative History of America, based on a Hopi perspective. His presentation is illustrated through original songs and art created by himself and his father. This presentation was webcast and recorded in the museum's Rasmuson Theater on November 18, 2018.

Transforming Teaching and Learning about American Indians: 3 Edwin Schupman 1

National Museum of the American Indian
Contemporary teaching about American Indians frequently present just a tiny glimpse into the rich and diverse cultures, histories, and contemporary lives of Native peoples. Transforming Teaching and Learning about American Indians is a symposium that explores the need to transform education about Native Americans that seek to address this deficiency and others. In this segment, Edwin Schupman, National Museum of the American Indian, speaks on "Racism Old and New: The Uncomfortable Relationship between Textbooks and American Indians." Edwin Schupman, a citizen of the Muscogee (Creek) Nation of Oklahoma, is the manager of Native Knowledge 360° (NK360°), the National Museum of the American Indian’s national education initiative to inspire and promote improvement of education about American Indians. Schupman completed a master’s degree in Music Theory at Miami University and doctoral coursework in ethnomusicology at the University of California, Los Angeles. After completing a repatriation project with early recordings of American Indian music at the American Folklife Center of the Library of Congress, he began his long career in the field of American Indian education. Beginning in 1988 he worked for ORBIS Associates, an American Indian education firm, creating culture and standards-based lessons on American Indian topics, training teachers nationwide, and evaluating educational projects. At the Bureau of Indian Education, Schupman co-wrote a culture-based health and wellness curriculum and developed a national teacher training program. In 2004, he joined the education staff at the National Museum of the American Indian. During Schupman’s career, he has conducted education work in more than 170 Native American reservation and non-reservation communities nationwide. The symposium was webcast and recorded in the National Museum of the American Indian Rasmuson Theater on November 1, 2018.

Transforming Teaching and Learning about American Indians: 7 Discussion with Symposium Speakers

National Museum of the American Indian
Contemporary teaching about American Indians frequently present just a tiny glimpse into the rich and diverse cultures, histories, and contemporary lives of Native peoples. Transforming Teaching and Learning about American Indians is a symposium that explores the need to transform education about Native Americans that seek to address this deficiency and others. In this segment, the symposium speakers return to the stage to answer questions from the audience. The speakers are (left to right) discussion moderator Maria Elena Campisteguy, Metropolitan Group; Stephanie Fryberg, University of Washington; Sarah Shear, Penn State Altoona; and Edwin Schupman, National Museum of the American Indian. The symposium was webcast and recorded in the National Museum of the American Indian Rasmuson Theater on November 1, 2018.

Across Atlantic Ice

National Museum of Natural History
Join Smithsonian Anthropologist Dr. Dennis Stanford as he untangles the prehistoric peopling of America by studying ancient projectile points and mitochondrial DNA evidence. Could these clues give us a better picture of early America?

Masons of Djenné - City of Mud

National Museum of Natural History
Part one of a four part film series created for the exhibition, Mud Masons of Mali. Djenné masons speak of the history of city, its founding myth, its architecture and the role of the masons in maintaining this architectural legacy. The masons also speak about the importance for the community of the annual ceremony of re-plastering the Great Mosque. Djenné Masons Konbaba Tennepo Boubacar (Bayeré) Kouroumansé Lassina (Al-Haji) Kouroumansé Salif Droufo Almamy (Fa) Kouroumansé Executive Producer Mary Jo Arnoldi Producer/Director Trevor Marchand Videographer Pete Durgerian Production Assistant John Heywood Interviewer Bilagalama Sissoko Additional Camerawork Salahina (Mody) Sounfountera (Djenné) Trevor Marchand (Leiden) Translation Wilfred Willey Photography Tevor Marchand Additional Photography Barbara Frank Joseph Brunet-Jailly Bilagalama Sissoko Donald Hurlbert, NMNH, Smithsonian Institution Dan Cole, NMNH, Smithsonian Institution Narrator Rae Durgerian Music Lassana Diabaté Toumani Kouyaté Music Production, Bamako Paul Chandler Audio Post-Production Al Green Special Thanks to Annette Schmidt, Rijksmuseum voor Volkenkunde, Leiden Michael Spierenburg Samuel Sidibé, Musée National du Mali British Academy for the Humanities and Social Sciences The Netherlands Embassy in Bamako, Mali Salahina Sounfountera, Mali Tours, Bamako Indiana University Press Lucy Durán, School of Oriental and African Studies, London Violet Diallo Geert Mommersteeg Pierre Maas Charlotte Joy The Atlantic Fish Shop, Leiden Al-Hijrah Mosque in Leiden The Dutch masons of Koninklijke Woudenberg B.V. Anna Portisch

Skin & Bones - Animal Life: Steller's Sea Cow

National Museum of Natural History
The Steller's Sea Cow is a large extinct marine mammal that inhabited the cold waters surrounding an island on the Bering Sea. This video is one of a series taken from the mobile app Skin & Bones. The app brings animal skeletons to life through 3D imagery in the Bone Hall at the Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History. Download on the App Store and enjoy the videos and 3D experience at the Museum or wherever you are.

How do paleontologists identify dinosaur teeth?

National Museum of Natural History
Smithsonian Curator Matthew Carrano identifies Cretaceous dinosaur teeth from the Washington DC area.

Sharing the Dena'ina Language

National Museum of Natural History
The Alaska Office of the Smithsonian's Arctic Studies Center hosted the Dena'ina Language Institute from October 4-8, 2010 at the Living Our Cultures exhibit gallery located in the Anchorage Museum. Elders Helen Dick and Gladys Evanoff shared their knowledge about Dena'ina heritage objects in the Smithsonian collections, using the objects as tools to teach the Dena'ina Athabascan language. They worked with language learners, linguists and museum staff to script and record new language learning videos for a series published on YouTube (link at http://qenaga.org/). The Dena'ina program initiated Recovering Voices -- an international Smithsonian program to assist indigenous communities with language preservation and education -- at the Arctic Studies Center in Anchorage. For more information, go to http://www.mnh.si.edu/arctic/html/alaska.htm

Human Origins: Hobbits on Flores, Indonesia

National Museum of Natural History
A tiny hominin found on the island of Flores, Indonesia has shaken up the world of paleoanthropology. Human Origins scientist Matt Tocheri explains why.
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