Skip to Content
  • Language
  • End User
  • Educational Use
  • Time Required
(343)
(969)
(1,134)
(994)
(1,269)
(22)
(508)
(397)
(194)
(733)
(263)
(276)

Found 1,312 Collections

 

John Brown: Madman or Martyr?

A collection of materials related to John Brown's raid at Harper's Ferry, VA on October 16, 1859.
Key words: Abolition, John Brown, slavery, Harper's Ferry, Civil war.
Linda Muller
10
 

Theodore Roosevelt - "Bully for you!"

A collection of resources on America's 26th President, Theodore Roosevelt.
Linda Muller
11
 

Libyan Rock Art

This collection contains images of rock-art of the Wadi al-Ajal, in the Fezzan region of south-west Libya. Several hundred engravings have so far been identified here. This rich concentration of rock-art spans the phase from at least 7,000 years ago until the present - a critical period of time which encompasses major transitions in human economy, culture and ideology from hunting and gathering to raising livestock, then to agriculture and more recently to industrialization. Rock-art provides fascinating evidence of how human groups were living during this period, what their relationships with their environment were and what they considered of importance and value. Because rock-art is deliberately placed at specific locations in the landscape, a powerful relationship can often exist between rock-art sites and natural landscape features.
Kelly Heilman
16
 

Middle Ages: Heraldry and Guild Symbols

Resources in this Collection depict images of heraldry and guild symbols from the Middle Ages.
Linda Muller
18
 

Branches of Government

This Collection contains resource to help students understand the three branches of government in the United States.
Linda Muller
12
 

An Introduction to Hawai'ian Lei Making

All Polynesians have a history of making and giving of lei. From early times, Hawaiians have fashioned lei from shells, seeds, bone, and feathers and from more temporary materials such as leaves, vines, and a few indigenous flowers. Colorful flowers and greenery are braided, twisted, wrapped, or strung together to create lei for the neck, head, wrists and ankles. Lei are made and given for marriages, birthdays, luaus, and funerals. Leis are also given on informal occasions to express gratitude or warmth of friendship. In this collection, you’ll learn how to make your own lei and explore other examples of leis made from a variety of natural materials.
Ashley Naranjo
6
 

From Silk Worms to the Silk Road

This is a collection of resources that could be used to support a lesson on the discovery of silk and the impact of the silk road(s). Artifacts include images of silkworms and the silk-making process, websites with information about the luxuries traded on the Silk Road, and video summary.

Possible guiding questions include:
-Why did silk become such an important commodity in China?
-How did the development of the silk trade routes impact both Europe and Asia?
-In what ways do artifacts from Europe and Asia reveal the cultural connections created by the Silk Road?
Kate Harris
19
 

Ancient Egypt: A Variety of Artifacts

A topical collection to be used for student research projects.
Kate Harris
55
 

The Middle Ages: Discover the Story

This collection includes objects and artifacts representing life in the Middle Ages. Students are challenged to write a creative story or narrative based on the objects in the collection, illustrating life at the time. The last two resources in the collection are a worksheet that teachers may use to frame the assignment and a grading rubric for the assignment.
Kate Harris
12
 

Slavery in Western Pennsylvania

How was freedom achieved in PA?

Students will compare/contrast a slave's choice to runaway for freedom or wait for gradual emancipation.
Jason Smith
7
 

Pennants, Pins, Paintings & Posters: Artifacts of Political Protest

A mixed bag of artifacts of political and social protest movements in United States history. This collection can serve as a source of inspiration for students creating their own protest posters around a cause they believe in. The collection begins with a video by KQED Art School describing the characteristics of political art and a formula for making it.
Kate Harris
42
 

Dissolution of Native American Territory 1885-1905

This student activity examines what events, including the Dawes Act of 1887, contributed to the change in Native American reservation boundaries over time. Includes a video discussing 19th century views toward Native Americans, maps of reservation territory in 1885, 1895, 1905, and 1965, discussion questions, and an opportunity to learn more using an interactive map.
Tess Porter
8
 

Artful Animals: Leadership

What traits make a good leader? What can we learn about ourselves by looking at our relationship with animals? This student activity explores these questions through animal symbolism in African art, focusing on an embroidered Fante “Cloth of the Great.” Includes multiple objects, short-answer questions, an mp3 of a folktale read aloud, and a creative writing activity.

Tag: Africa

This collection was created to support the 2016 CCSSO Teachers of the Year Day at the Smithsonian.
Deborah Stokes
14
 

Artful Animals: Conservation

This student activity analyzes our relationship to three types of African animals – antelope, elephants, and primates – through their representation in African art and a discussion of the real-world threats that face them. Focuses on three species: scimitar-horned oryx, African elephants, and western lowland gorillas. Includes photographs, art objects, fact sheets, a reading-level appropriate article, discussion questions, and a collection-building activity.

Tag: Africa

This collection was created to support the 2016 CCSSO Teachers of the Year Day at the Smithsonian.
Deborah Stokes
17
 

Artful Animals: Storytelling and Symbol

This student activity explores African animal symbolism through visual art and folktales. Twelve animals are profiled, including leopards, primates, spiders, chameleons, and the mythical chi wara. Includes objects, an audio folktale ('The Leopard’s Drum’), short answer questions, a creative writing exercise, and opportunities to learn more.

Tag: Africa

This collection was created to support the 2016 CCSSO Teachers of the Year Day at the Smithsonian.
Deborah Stokes
20
 

Teaching Resources: Artful Animals

This topical collection gathers resources related to animal meanings and motifs in African art. Includes art objects related to 30 animals (real and mythical!), information on symbolism, a map of Africa, activities, audio, folktales, a guide on how to look at African art, and links to other teaching resources on Artful Animals.

Tag: Africa

This collection was created to support the 2016 CCSSO Teachers of the Year Day at the Smithsonian.
Deborah Stokes
40
 

Identifying Characteristics of Renaissance Art

This collection will teach you about how Renaissance artists changed the style and focus of art in the period between 1300 and 1600 CE. When you are done, you should be able to thoroughly answer the question: How did the art of the Renaissance reflect the new emphasis on humanism and science?

First, review the painting, Raphael's School of Athens, and learn about the new techniques used.
Then study the additional works in the collection and try to use them as examples of the different techniques. Some of the works are from the Renaissance period and others are more modern interpretations. A worksheet is included at the end of this collection to record your work.
Finally, test your knowledge with a quick quiz. Use your worksheet to help!
Kate Harris
11
 

Artful Thinking About America's Capital City

What do you think you know about Washington, D.C.? This collection is designed to help students develop and practice their skills for examining and thinking about art that was created to represent America's Capital City.
Linda Muller
9
 

"...Give Me Liberty or Give Me Death!"

This teaching collection includes resources such as postage stamps, artworks and dramatic readings related to Patrick Henry, a Founding Father of the United States, who famously ended his speech at the Virginia Convention on March 23, 1775, with the phrase "...give me liberty or give me death." Also included are suggested Speech Analysis Questions from ReadWriteThink to support careful examination of Henry's speeches. Guiding Question: How did this speech inspire change in the colonies? Use textual evidence to support your answer.
Ashley Naranjo
8
 

Thomas Paine's "Common Sense"

This teaching collection includes resources such as a dramatic reading, an online exhibition, a postage stamp, and an article related to Thomas Paine, a Founding Father of the United States, who famously authored the influential pamphlet, "Common Sense". Also includes excerpts of "Common Sense" and a Document Analysis Sheet with suggested questions for in-depth examination. Guiding Question: How did this document inspire change in the colonies? Use textual evidence to support your answer.
Ashley Naranjo
7
 

Photograph Analysis: Migrant Workers in the Great Depression

This collection includes only one image and is intended as a discussion-based warm-up to a lesson on the Great Depression and migrant families. Suggested questions for discussion, a photograph analysis worksheet and a writing prompt are included.
Kate Harris
4
 

Objects that Changed the Way We Live

In this collection, we'll explore everyday objects and their impacts on society. Students can begin by reading an illustrated essay from the National Museum of American History highlighting objects that capture several pivotal moments in innovation. Included in this collection are the clock, the iPod, the bicycle and the cellular phone. What other objects have changed the way we lived?
Ashley Naranjo
11
 

Investigating a Place: Niagara Falls

What defines a place? Examine this collection of images from or about Niagara Falls to answer these questions: What are its unique set of physical and cultural conditions? How do these physical and cultural conditions interact? How is Niagara Falls connected to other places? What are the consequences of human activity on the cultural and physical landscape? Ask students individually or in small groups to create a collection in Learning Lab to represent the physical and cultural characteristics of another place. Using these collections, ask students to write summary statements describing the unique human and physical characteristics of places researched. In class discuss student collections and what makes each place unique.
Stephanie Norby
17
 

Droughts and Dust Bowls

This is a collection of teaching resources about droughts and the Dust Bowl. While it is mainly focused on 20th century American history, there are also some links to articles that cover droughts more broadly across time and cultures. I have included some artists (Woody Guthrie, John Steinbeck, nda Dorothea Lange) who recorded the effects of the Dust Bowl on American society. There is also a selection of lesson plans and videos that explain how farming practices and environmental changes lead to droughts, and how people have responded by changing practices and developing new technologies.

Resources in this collection might be used in Language Arts, Social Studies, or Science classrooms. Questions to consider might include:
-How do people impact their environment?
-How do changes to the environment impact peoples' lives?
-How did government and society respond to the disaster of the Dust Bowl?
-What is government's responsibility in times of natural disaster?
-What steps can be taken to prevent future environmental disasters?

Kate Harris
27
1225-1248 of 1,312 Collections