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Found 1,403 Collections

 

Black History Month Family Festival: Interviews, Performances, Highlights

This collections comes from a Black History Month family festival created to complement the exhibition, "The Black List." Included here are a gallery tour with curator Ann Shumard, and interviews with puppeteer Schroeder Cherry, guitarist Warner Williams, the Taratibu Youth Association Step Dance Group, silhouette artist Lauren Muney and collage artist Michael Albert.

Philippa Rappoport
7
 

Capturing Visitor Voices in Teen-Made videos

In 2011 the Smithsonian joined with the Pearson Foundation to train ARTLAB+ teens to document personal stories at Smithsonian Heritage Month family festivals. ARTLAB+ is a design studio based out of ArtLab space in the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden. The teens captured visitor voices through several years, covering a variety of topics including views on race, culture, nature, belonging, music and food.

Philippa Rappoport
12
 

Raven Steals the Sun: A Celebration of Tlingit Culture

This collections comes from an American Indian Heritage Month family festival focusing on Tlingit culture from the northwest coast of America. Included here are music and dance performances by the Dakhka Kwaan Dancers, storytelling by Gene Tagaban, Shelly Laws, and Maria Williams (of her book, "How Raven Stole the Sun"), a moiety game, and hands-on demonstrations by Shelly Laws of how to weave a two-stranded basket and to make Tlingit-style beaded ear loops .

Philippa Rappoport
10
 

Passport to Argentina: Performances, Interviews, Demonstrations, How-To Videos

This collections comes from a Hispanic Heritage Month Family Day, held in the Kogod Courtyard of the National Portrait Gallery and the Smithsonian American Art Museum, as part of a larger "Argentina at the Smithsonian" series. Included here are music and dance interviews and performances about tango, and a how-to demonstration to make a clay llama.

Philippa Rappoport
5
 

Forensic Anthropology Case: Discovering Jane

Teaching guide introducing a forensic case file from 2012, when Jamestown archaeologists excavated fragments of a human skull and leg bone dating to the winter of 1609-1610. This collection was created with the Anthropology team at the National Museum of Natural History.

(http://anthropology.si.edu/writteninbone/Jane.html )

Anthony Cox
19
 

Art reflecting Life

Art, posters and artifacts that reflect events and viewpoints changing over time. Make sure you refer back to the questions on canvas!

magough
7
 

George Catlin Letter

Students will compare George Catlin's remarks in his letters with selected paintings from his collection. Students should read through the text passage, which contains excerpts from one of George Catlin's letters home. Teachers may want to consider having a print out of this text for students to view while also looking at images. As students read, they will match each painting to a paragraph in the text.

Michelle Moses
11
 

University of Brasilia - Fotos antigas da Bahia

Coleção que reúne fotos antigas da Bahia, Brasil.

Gabriel Amaral
17
 

University of Brasilia - O mito de Juan Santos Atahualpa.

A história do indígena que mobilizou seu povo, o povo Campa, e outros povos indígenas da Amazônia Central em prol da liberdade e contra a colonização espanhola no século XVIII.

Leticia Amarante
6
 

University of Brasilia; Brazilian Flora and Fauna

A collection about Brazilian Nature, mainly Cerrado to use with students from public schools in Taguatinga with Catholic University of Brasilia teachers support.

Nita P.
13
 

University of Brasilia; History and Culture through food

The collection had approached the story through food

Francelle Cavalcante
9
 

University of Brasilia - Brasões/Coat of Arms

Coleção de Brasões e Escudos para serem estudados por estudantes de Heráldica em seu estudo dessa ciência.

Jade Deus
14
 

University of Brasilia Martin Luther King Jr.

Coleção sobre Martin Luther King Jr. voltada para exposição em aula ministrada a alunos do ensino médio.

Jorge Quintiliano
17
 

University of Brasilia - comics

desenhos em quadrinhos que não possuem cores

Joana Diniz
26
 

The Black Arts Movement

“Sometimes referred to as 'the artistic sister of the Black Power Movement,' the Black Arts Movement stands as the single most controversial moment in the history of African-American literature—possibly in American literature as a whole. Although it fundamentally changed American attitudes both toward the function and meaning of literature as well as the place of ethnic literature in English departments, African-American scholars as prominent as Henry Louis Gates, Jr., have deemed it the 'shortest and least successful' movement in African American cultural history."--"Black Creativity: On the Cutting Edge," Time (Oct. 10, 1994)

This topical collection includes background information as well as examples of poetry and art from the Black Arts Movement. Two excerpts from essays are also included. There are also some examples of works from artists who rejected the premise of the Black Arts Movement.

Students could use this collection as a starting point for further research or to create an illustrated timeline of the movement. Works could be analyzed for their reflection or rejection of themes like: black nationalism, self-determination, "the black is beautiful" movement, and liberation. Students could also evaluate the merits of the arguments for and against a "black arts movement" as articulated by Karenga and Saunders in the text excerpts.

This is a work-in-progress based on the digitized materials within the Smithsonian Learning Lab's collection--it is not meant to be wholly definitive or authoritative.

Kate Harris
41
 

Resources for Teaching African-American History

A collection of teaching resources about African-American history, from slavery to modern-day. This is a work-in-progress based on the digitized materials within the Smithsonian Learning Lab's collection--it is not meant to be wholly definitive or authoritative. This collection will be updated frequently and includes both individual artifacts and lesson plans.

Kate Harris
38
 

The Black Power Movement

Teaching about the Black Power Movement can be challenging, but has rich rewards. Misconceptions about the Black Power Movement abound, but the ability to contrast their strategies and aims with the earlier Civil Rights Movement allows Social Studies teachers to discuss the complex ways that social movements evolve, change, and respond to the times. In addition, a study of the Black Power Movement helps give context for a broader study of the economic and political shifts in the 1970s and 1980s and the rise of identity politics. This teaching collection includes a variety of resources that could be used to teach about the Black Power Movement, organized into sections for:

-People in the Movement

-Goals and Strategies of the Movement

-Teaching Activities

General guiding questions for this collection include:

-What were the distinct problems that the Black Power Movement tried to address? Do they remain today?

-What were the strategies of the Black Power Movement? Do you agree or disagree with these?

-Why and how do social movements develop and evolve?

-What defines a successful social movement? Was the Black Power Movement successful?

- Can a social movement survive beyond the demise of its leadership?

-What is the role of the arts in promoting the ideals of social movements?

This is a work-in-progress based on the digitized materials within the Smithsonian Learning Lab's collection--it is not meant to be wholly definitive or authoritative.

Kate Harris
31
 

Teaching about the Chicano Movement

This collection gathers resources and artifacts pertaining to the Chicano Movement of the post-WWII era. The following paragraphs, from the Educating Change website, briefly define the movement:

The "Chicano Movement" has been used by historians to describe a moment of ethnic empowerment and protest among Americans of Mexican descent beginning in the 1960s. "Chicano" had long existed as a pejorative term among young Mexican Americans prior to this period. By the 1960s, however, young Mexican Americans embraced the label, reinscribing it with notions of pride in ones' Mexican heritage and defiance against institutions and individuals who practiced or condoned discrimination against Mexicans.

The "movement" or movimiento was really a convergence of multiple movements that historians have broken down into at least four components: [1] A youth movement represented in the struggle against discrimination in schools and the anti-war movement; [2] the farmworkers movement; [3] the movement for political empowerment, most notably in the formation of La Raza Unida Party; and [4] the struggle for control and ownership over "homelands" in the US Southwest (http://www.brown.edu/Research/Coachella/chicano.ht...). We will add an additional component of [5] creating art and music to reflect and voice cultural pride.

Students will review the collection here and identify five items that connect to one of the components listed above. They will then create their own collection that acts as a digital exhibit, teaching others about the Chicano Movement. This assignment is described in further detail on the last resource in this collection.

This is a work-in-progress based on the digitized materials within the Smithsonian Learning Lab's collection--it is not meant to be wholly definitive or authoritative.

Kate Harris
36
 

Photographs from Ellis Island

This is a collection of five photographs taken in the late 19th and early 20th centuries as well as a handout to be used with the photos. Use the collection as a warm up or prompt for further research about the experience of immigrants to America. Teachers could assign different photographs to small groups so that students can share ideas and questions as they closely examine each one, focusing on differences between what is clearly evident in each photo as well as what can be inferred or hypothesized.

What can we learn about the experience of immigrants at Ellis Island from photographs? What emotions are expressed in these images? Challenge students to consider the photographers process and perspective: Are these images staged or candid? What kind of statement do you think the photographer might be making about immigration at this time?

More teaching ideas are include in the "Notes to Other Users" section.

Kate Harris
8
 

Discover the Story: A Miner's Life

This collection includes objects and artifacts representing life in as a miner. Students are challenged to write a creative story or narrative based on the objects in the collection, illustrating life at the time. The last two resources in the collection are a worksheet that teachers may use to frame the assignment and a grading rubric for the assignment.

Tags: Pennsylvania, narrative, Pittsburgh, mining, miner, immigration, coal, worker safety, child labor
Kate Harris
16
 

Voting in America: The Early Years

The evolution of the voting ballot.
Candice Troutman
5
 

Presidential Portraiture: Looking and Analyzing Questions

A topical collection of United States presidential portraits. This collection might be best shortened to introduce a specific historical era and the leader(s) of the time, or adapted to show how American leaders wanted to be perceived during their tenure and legacy and how artists depicted them. It includes the National Portrait Gallery's "Reading" Portraiture at a Glance sheet, which offers suggested looking and analyzing questions. It is also includes associated curator and educator talks on the portraits of the presidents, where possible.
Ashley Naranjo
55
 

The March on Washington

The Civil Rights Movement of the 1950s and 60s tackled many problems facing African-Americans at the time. This collection offers a brief video introduction into the March on Washington in 1963, which brought national attention to many of these issues, and asks students to analyze a photograph and three artifacts from the March. Students will answer the question "What problems did participants in the March on Washington aim to solve?" and consider how these issues continue to have relevance in the United States today.

tags: Civil Rights, Martin Luther King, A. Phillip Randolph
Kate Harris
6
 

Money, Money, Money

A examination of currency from various cultures and eras.
Brian Ausland
19
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