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Found 6,953 Collections

 

Flying Insects

A large collection of objects and images related to flying insects, including ladybugs, dragonflies, bees, butterflies, moths, and fireflies

Katherine Schoonover
63
 

Collisions in Portraiture

Collisions in Portraiture highlights the ways in which artists and sitters use portraiture to reveal what happens when cultures collide. By analyzing portraiture, students will consider how cultural collisions are visualized from the nineteenth to twenty-first centuries. Students will explore the powerful contributions to the history and culture of the United States through portraiture.

Objectives: After completing this lesson, students will be better able to: 

  • Examine how modern and contemporary artists use portraiture to reveal aspects of a sitter’s individual, community/cultural, and national identity. 
  • Identify key components of a portrait and discuss what one can learn about the sitter through these components. 
  • Discuss the artistic choices that portrait artists make and consider how such decisions can reveal the artists’ viewpoints and also influence the viewers’ understanding of the sitters’ identity. 
  • Use the museum’s collection as a gateway to investigating and exploring of the visualization of colliding cultures.

#NPGteach

Keywords

Portraiture, Collisions, Harriet Tubman, Civil War, Stonewall, Roger Shimomura, Chief Joseph, Robert Rauschenberg, United Farm Workers

Nicole Vance
44
 

Viral Histories: Stories of Racism, Resilience, and Resistance in Asian American Communities

How do we  strengthen and build community in the middle of an emergency?

During the COVID-19 pandemic, Asian Americans have been experiencing increased racism and hate crimes. While these incidents of increased prejudice and violence occur today, they reflect a long history of how power, prejudice, and public health have intersected throughout American history. 

For Asian Pacific American History Month, Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History held conversations in a series called Viral Histories: Stories of Racism, Resilience, and Resistance in Asian American Communities, with community leaders combating racism while serving on the front lines. Community leaders shared their first-hand experience with historians who connect these experiences to the past.  

This collection contains several sub-collections that explore different topics related to this event.  Learn more at https://s.si.edu/ViralHistories

#ViralHistories

National Museum of American History
7
 

Art & Resistance 3: The Poetry of Joy Harjo (Part B)

The purpose of this Joy Harjo inspired collection is to model for educators distance learning instruction:

  1. using museum artifacts & visual texts to learn/ teach
    • historical/ cultural context for poetry study 
      • as a followup to Art & Resistance 3:  Kent Monkman & Indian Residential Schools (Part A)
  2. using Project Zero thinking routines to interrogate text

"(At Home) On Art and Resiliece: Artist Talk with Kent Monkman" presented by the Hirshhorn Museum inspired me to create a collection that, like his art, speaks to the complicated relationship between between indigenous people and settlers in America. I resonated with Monkman's artistic ethos about the heretofore missing narratives of indigenous people and the limited colonial perspective from which their history is most often told. 

Prior to hearing Monkman speak, I had begun crafting a Smithsonian Learning Lab series of collections centering creators from marginalized groups in America breaking out from preconceptions of their "place" in America's racialized hierarchy.  Art and Resistance 1 is a collection that centers Frederick Douglass as a master of 19th century's version of social media. He wielded his likeness as a weapon against the ubiquity of the anti-black/ racist imagery of his time.  Art and Resistance 2 is an homage to professor, editor, and Nobel & Pulitzer Prize winning novelist Toni Morrison. The collection centers her literary ethos to be among and to write about the African American experience, outside of the white gaze. 

During the Hirshhorn Zoom event, when Monkman spoke of the resiliency of indigenous people, I knew they would be the subject of my next collection.  In view of my students' limited experience interrogating the complexities of Indian History, Monkman's paintings The Scream and The Scoop provided a visceral entrypoint for my students to get engaged in studying the shameful policy of Residential Indian Boarding Schools as historical and cultural context for a subsequent literary study of the poetry of America's Poet Laureate Joy Harjo.


Sher Anderson Petty
20
 

Conducting an Oral History: Tips from Across the Smithsonian

Oral history is a technique for generating and preserving original, historically interesting information – primary source material – from personal recollections through planned recorded interviews. This collection includes tips for conducting your own oral history from a student journalist and a historian, guides with suggestions for setting up your own interview, and recorded oral histories from key moments documenting a range of events in 20th century history. 

Recommended questions to consider with this collection of resources: What is the purpose and value of oral histories in relation to understanding historic events?  How do oral histories compare to other sources of information? How can what we learn in school help us understand and process the experience of today, in the context of history? What is our responsibility to document, reflect, and advocate? 

Ashley Naranjo
15
 

Formats and Processes: Cartes-de-visite

#nmahphc

This is a selection of cartes-de-visite from the Photographic History Collection.

The sitters and photographers in this Learning Lab collection are well-known, lesser known, and unidentified. There are a number of photographs that are not portraits, including a stereoview of a cartes-de-visite studio.

Learning Lab collections, Seville CDV Collection and Photo Albums contain additional cartes-de-visite.

For additional collections, search collections.si.edu.

Keywords: CDV, carte de visite, cartes de visite, portraiture, studio portrait, collectible photography, celebrity photography

NMAH Photographic History Collection
120
 

Dinosaurs are DINO-mite!

I created this collection for families to do together while schools are closed. I will be making a collection a day while we are out of school. Today we will be exploring dinosaurs. The idea is for families to look at the items in the collection and consider what they see in the objects and paintings, what they think, and what they wonder. Families can also watch a free Brainpop video about dinosaurs as well as explore PBS EON videos about dinosaurs. Families can learn about these prehistoric animals and consider all the evidence scientists have uncovered. At the end of the collection I have provided a few ideas for families about what to do next.

If you want to learn more about more about See Think Wonder you can click here to see a video of a teacher using the routine in her classroom.

Ellen Rogers
45
 

Let's Make and Play: Coins in the Bank

In this activity, you'll use common craft supplies to create a piggy bank to fill with paper coins. Look at the following Smithsonian resources and think about how coins have changed over time. Then complete the activity that follows.

Parents and caregivers can use this activity to help children gain a better understanding of coins, their names, and their values. Let’s Make and Play activities are designed to be children-led activities with minimal direction or oversight required.

Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access
25
 

Let's Make and Play: USA Collage

In this activity, you'll use common craft supplies to create a collage that represents what America means to you. Look at the following Smithsonian resources for inspiration, then complete the activity that follows.

Parents and caregivers can use this activity to help children gain a better understanding of the symbols, icons, and traditions that represent the United States of America. Let’s Make and Play activities are designed to be children-led activities with minimal direction or oversight required.

Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access
17
 

Let's Make and Play: Making Mobiles

In this activity, you'll use common craft supplies to create a mobile. Look at the following Smithsonian resources for inspiration, then complete the activity that follows.

Parents and caregivers can use this activity to help children gain a better understanding of basic shape compositions, and counting by ones and tens. Let’s Make and Play activities are designed to be children-led activities with minimal direction or oversight required.

Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access
15
 

Let's Make and Play: No Place Like Home

In this activity, you'll use common craft supplies to create a model of your home and a three-dimensional map of your neighborhood. Look at the following Smithsonian resources for inspiration, then complete the activity that follows.

Parents and caregivers can use this activity to help children gain a better understanding of location and direction within their neighborhood. Let’s Make and Play activities are designed to be children-led activities with minimal direction or oversight required.

Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access
16
 

Re-Imagining Migration DC Seminar Series, 2019-2020: Session 4

What does it take to prepare our youth for a world on the move with quality?

This collection is the fourth in a series of five created to support the Re-Imagining Migration DC Seminar Series, held between December 2019 to May 2020. The seminar series is led by Verónica Boix Mansilla, Senior Principal Investigator for Harvard Graduate School of Education's Project Zero, and Research Director for Re-Imagining Migration, with in-gallery experiences provided by educators from the Smithsonian American Art Museum, the National Museum of American History, the National Portrait Gallery, the Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access, and the National Gallery of Art.

This set of collections is designed to be dynamic. We will continue to add material, including participant-created content, throughout the seminar series so that the collections themselves can be used as a type of textbook, reflecting the content, development, and outputs of the full seminar series. Please check back to the hashtag #ReImaginingMigration to see a growing body of materials to support educators as they strive to serve and teach about human migration in relevant and deep ways.

In this session, held online while we are all home social distancing in the time of COVID-19, we will

* examine how immigrant origin youth may be experiencing the epidemic

* experiment with a set of revised socio-emotional thinking routines, and

* gather your input about the ways in which Re-imagining Migration together with the Smithsonian Learning Lab and the National Gallery of Art can support you as you prepare to engage students in digital learning.

#ReImaginingMigration

Re-imagining Migration
29
 

Abstracts to Accompany Poetry Lesson

Have students first answer the question, "Can you enjoy poetry without understanding it?" Usually, in my experience, the answer is no. Use the following pieces of abstract art and ask the same question. Can you deduct anything about the painting by what you see? What do you think about the painting? What is your emotional response? What do you wonder about the painting? By discussing these points, students will see that you can have an emotional reaction and enjoyment or non-enjoyment simply by looking at a piece for its parts. Replicate the same with the poem.

Jennifer Ingraham
8
 

Viral Histories: How will I choose to strengthen and build community in the middle of an emergency?

Viral Histories: Stories of Racism, Resilience, and Resistance in Asian American Communities

https://s.si.edu/ViralHistories

We must all learn to navigate uncertainty in these increasingly complex times. We can begin to do this by understanding that we are part of a larger community, recognize that the pandemic has led to xenophobia towards and endangerment of vulnerable communities, and accepting that we can make choices every day to help combat hate. 

Throughout the Viral Histories event we have asked viewers to reflect on the question: How do we choose to strengthen a community in the middle of an emergency? This collection includes exemplars of individuals and organizations, today and in the past, who have answered this question in different ways. 

We encourage you to explore these resources from the National Museum of American History and partners as you think about your answer to the question: How will I choose to strengthen and build community in the middle of an emergency? 

#ViralHistories

#NMAH

National Museum of American History
19
 

The Lethbridge Diving Engine

In 1715 an English wool merchant called John Lethbridge invented what is possibly the world's earliest diving 'suit' (or as he called it, 'diving engine') that did not require air to be provided by a pipe from the surface.

Other people had tried to do similar things and it is probable that John Lethbridge knew about these and based his design on precedent.

He had a very large family to support (he reputedly had 17 children!) and his plan was to make a diving engine that could enable him to make his fortune recovering treasure from shipwrecks.

the_diving_museum
8
 

Easy PZ: Unveiling Stories & Culturally Responsive Teaching with Students

Each Easy PZ collection includes an artwork or museum object and a recorded webinar demonstrating how to use it to develop students' skills with a Harvard Project Zero thinking routine. Supplementary resources provide context relevant to understanding the featured artwork or object.

This collection models the routine "Unveiling Stories" with a museum resource from the National Museum of African Art to support culturally responsive teaching.

Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access
15
 

Immigration

#smithstories

Yeferson Manchame
1
 

Viral Histories: Community Organizing in America's Chinatowns

What drives us to build community strength and resiliency during an emergency? 

During the COVID-19 pandemic, Asian Americans have been experiencing increased racism and hate crimes. While these incidents of increased prejudice and violence occur today, they reflect a long history of how power, prejudice, and public health have intersected throughout American history. For Asian Pacific American History Month, Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History held conversations in a series called Viral Histories: Stories of Racism, Resilience, and Resistance in Asian American Communities, with community leaders combating racism while serving on the front lines. Community leaders shared their first-hand experience with historians who connect these experiences to the past.  

In this topical collection, co-hosts Theodore S. Gonzalves, Smithsonian National Museum of American History Curator of Asian Pacific American History, and Lintaro Donovan, High School Student and Civic Leader, interview Max Leung, creator of the San Francisco Peace Collective, a volunteer civilian patrol group in San Francisco's Chinatown. Max discusses the impacts of COVID-19 on San Francisco's Chinatown community and how we can organize for our neighbors in the middle of a pandemic. 

This topical collection aims to contextualize what we learn from Max's interview by providing additional information about how Asian American communities have organized in the past and the present during COVID-19. As you explore the resources in this collection and reflect on Max's interview, we ask you to consider this question for self-reflection and discussion: What drives us to build community strength and resiliency during an emergency? 

#ViralHistories

Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center
20
 

Viral Histories: Asian American Resistance and Resilience

What is our responsibility to examine the assumptions we have about others? 

During the COVID-19 pandemic, Asian Americans have been experiencing increased racism and hate crimes. While these incidents of increased prejudice and violence occur today, they reflect a long history of how power, prejudice, and public health have intersected throughout American history. For Asian Pacific American History Month, Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History held conversations in a series called Viral Histories: Stories of Racism, Resilience, and Resistance in Asian American Communities, with community leaders combating racism while serving on the front lines. Community leaders shared their first-hand experience with historians who connect these experiences to the past.  

In this topical collection, co-hosts Theodore S. Gonzalves, Smithsonian National Museum of American History Curator of Asian Pacific American History, and Lintaro Donovan, High School Student and Civic Leader, interview Russell Jeung, Professor of Asian American Studies at San Francisco State University and creator of "Stop AAPI Hate," about the impacts of COVID-19 and the rise of anti-Asian racism. 

This topical collection aims to contextualize what we learn from Prof. Jeung's interview by providing additional information about the Chinese Exclusion Act, the Yellow Peril rhetoric from the 19th century, as well as moments of community resilience and resistance. As you explore the resources in the collection, we ask you to consider this question for self-reflection or discussion: What is our responsibility to examine the assumptions we have about others? 

#ViralHistories

Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center
17
 

Viral Histories: Asian Americans and the Food Service Industry

How do we maintain strength and community after an emergency is over? 

During the COVID-19 pandemic, Asian Americans have been experiencing increased racism and hate crimes. While these incidents of increased prejudice and violence occur today, they reflect a long history of how power, prejudice, and public health have intersected throughout American history. For Asian Pacific American History Month, Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History held conversations in a series called Viral Histories: Stories of Racism, Resilience, and Resistance in Asian American Communities, with community leaders combating racism while serving on the front lines. Community leaders shared their first-hand experience with historians who connect these experiences to the past.  

In this topical collection, co-hosts Theodore S. Gonzalves, Smithsonian National Museum of American History Curator of Asian Pacific American History, and Lintaro Donovan, High School Student and Civic Leader, interview Genevieve Villamora, co-owner of the Washington, DC-based restaurant Bad Saint, about the impacts of COVID-19 on the food service industry. 

This topical collection aims to contextualize what we learn from Genevieve Villamora's interview by providing additional information about the history of Asian Americans in the American food service industry and stories about Asian American foodways. As you explore the resources in this collection, and reflect on Genevieve Villamora's interview, we ask you to consider this question for self-reflection or discussion: How do we maintain strength and community after an emergency is over? 

#ViralHistories 

 

Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center
19
 

Viral Histories: Filipino American Nurses and Healthcare Workers

What do we take for granted? How does this inform the choices we make?

During the COVID-19 pandemic, Asian Americans have been experiencing increased racism and hate crimes. While these incidents of increased prejudice and violence occur today, they reflect a long history of how power, prejudice, and public health have intersected throughout American history. For Asian Pacific American History Month, Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History held conversations in a series called Viral Histories: Stories of Racism, Resilience, and Resistance in Asian American Communitieswith community leaders combating racism while serving on the front lines. Community leaders shared their first-hand experience with historians who connect these experiences to the past.  

In this topical collection, Viral Histories co-hosts Theodore S. Gonzalves, Smithsonian National Museum of American History Curator of Asian Pacific American History, and Lintaro Donovan, High School Student and Civic Leader, interview Abigaile De Mesa, a supervising nurse from New Jersey about the impacts of COVID-19 on healthcare workers. 

This topical collection aims to contextualize what we learn from Abigaile De Mesa's interview by providing additional information about the US Philippine War, the migration of Filipino nurses to the United States, and how COVID-19 is impacting nurses today. As you explore the resources in this collection, and reflect on Abigaile's interview, we ask you to consider this question for self-reflection or discussion: What do we take for granted? How does this inform the choices we make? 

Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center
19
 

Anna May Wong x Sally Wen Mao

How can you be a changemaker in society? 

This topical collection honors the life of film icon Anna May Wong by pairing images from the Smithsonian National Portrait Gallery collections with poetry by celebrated contemporary poet Sally Wen Mao. Wong's film and television career spanned from 1919 to 1960, and included numerous star turns, transnational celebrity, and an array of firsts for an Asian American actress. It was also a career forged in the shadow of--and in defiance of--widespread xenophobia, leaving a legacy that takes on a new cast and consequence today, in an era of COVID-19 and virulent anti-Asian racism. 

After viewing this topical collection, visit https://smithsonianapa.org/anna-may-wong/ to:

  • download a set of postcards that include portraits of Anna May Wong and Sally Wen Mao's poetry
  • watch a short video by Sally Wen Mao about her "patron saint," and
  • instructions for making your own postcards.
Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center
29
 

Art & Resistance 3: Kent Monkman & the Residential Indian Boarding School (Part A)

This collection was inspired by the work of Kent Monkman.

Sher Anderson Petty
20
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