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Episode 3 - Podcast: The Civil War and American Art

Smithsonian American Art Museum
In this podcast, curator Eleanor Jones Harvey discusses 6 featured paintings from "The Civil War and American Art" exhibition. This episode looks at "Aurora Borealis" by Frederic Edwin Church. "The Civil War and American Art" examines how America's artists represented the impact of the Civil War and its aftermath. The exhibition follows the conflict from palpable unease on the eve of war, to heady optimism that it would be over with a single battle, to a growing realization that this conflict would not end quickly and a deepening awareness of issues surrounding emancipation and the need for reconciliation. Genre and landscape painting captured the transformative impact of the war, not traditional history painting. Exhibition website: http://www.americanart.si.edu/exhibitions/archive/2012/art_civil_war/ Artwork: http://www.americanart.si.edu/collections/search/artwork/?id=4806

How Nam June Paik and Video Art Led a Good Abstract Painter Astray

Smithsonian American Art Museum
Artist, writer, and television personality Russell Connor celebrates Nam June Paik's birthday with the screening of excerpts from Global Groove, a film narrated by Connor,who chats about his collaborations with Paik and other video artists.

High School Invention Projects (Why & How)

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
Joshua Schuler, Executive Director of the Lemelson-MIT Program, describes the twenty-first-century thinking skills used in the invention process and explains how that process is used throughout high schools in the United States by the InvenTeams program. Smithsonian, Cooper-Hewitt National Design Museum

CDFS in 60 Seconds (High Definition)

Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory
This image is what is known as the Chandra Deep Field South, a 4-million-second exposure made by NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory.

SN1006 In 60 Seconds

Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory
The new Chandra data provide new details about SN 1006.

Cat's Eye Nebula in 60 Seconds Plus

Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory
This composite of data from NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory and the Hubble Space Telescope is another look for NGC 6543, better known as the Cat's Eye nebula.

Chandra in the (Google) Sky

Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory
Astronomy is truly in a golden age. With a fleet of space-based observatories, including the Chandra X-ray Observatory, astronomers now have a suite of amazing tools to study the Universe. Simultaneously to this bonanza in astronomy has been the growth and expansion of the Internet. Think back to before 1990. The Internet was barely a rumor and there were no Great Observatories! But now people are taking advantage of these two seemingly separate advances to do some amazing things

Chikasha Poya: We Are Chickasaw - Stomp Dancers 3

National Museum of the American Indian
Jesse Lindsey of the Chickasaw Nation emcees this third traditional dance and singing performance by the Chickasaw Stomp Dancers. The public is invited to join in on the last dance. The festival was webcast from the Potomac Atrium of the National Museum of the American Indian on August 15, 2014.

Sugpiaq Storytelling with Ed Tiulana

National Museum of the American Indian
Ed Tiulana (Inupiaq/Tlingit) offers an authentic Alaskan storytelling experience.. Since childhood, he has studied traditional Native dance and has since performed with Alaska's King Island Dance group throughout the United States, South Korea and South America. This performance took place on January 18, 2013 as part of the Out of Many multicultural festival of music, dance, and story.

Día de los Muertos Festival 2015 - La Danza de los Tecuanes 1

National Museum of the American Indian
As part of the museum's annual Day of the Dead festival, Grupo los Tecuanes perform La Danza de los Tecuanes (Dance of the Jaguar) in the Potomac Atrium. This is the second day of performances by this Mixtec culture group and took place on October 31, 2015.

I’ve Been Indigenous My Whole Life: Images of Indigenous Art and Activism

National Museum of the American Indian
Gregg Deal, a provocative contemporary artist/activist and 15 year resident of the DC metro area, discusses his work, which explores indigenous identity and pop-culture, touching on issues of race relations, historical consideration and stereotype. This is especially true with Deal’s latest performance pieces, The Last American Indian on Earth and REDSKIN. In The Last American Indian on Earth, the artist exploits stereotypes existing in American culture while simultaneously challenging the viewer’s understanding of the Indigenous as both contemporary and relic. REDSKIN, a work that employs acts of micro-aggression (particularly in the way fans of the Washington Football team engage Indigenous people), illustrates the imbalance of equality, authority, and voice within the context of the mascot debate. Within this work, as well as his paintings and murals, Deal advances issues within Indian country such as decolonization, conversations surrounding local and national sports mascots, and cultural appropriation. In his unflinching examination of such heavy subject matter, Deal speaks to these issues with intelligence and sharp wit, remaining keenly aware of his place as an Indigenous man and a contemporary artist. Following his presentation, Deal responds to questions from the audience, further exploring the themes of his art. Gregg Deal (Pyramid Lake Paiute) has appeared on Totally Biased with W. Kamau Bell, and most recently The Daily Show. Deal has been published in numerous media outlets, specifically Washington Post, Huffington Post, High Country News, Washington City Paper, Indian Country Today. Learn more about Deal's work at his web site, http://www.greggdeal.com and his FaceBook page, https://www.facebook.com/greggdealart. He tweets @greggdeal. This presentation was webcast and recorded in the Rasmuson Theater of the National Museum of the American Indian on December 7, 2014 as part of the three-day program, Capture Shawdows: Circulating Images of Native Americans on Film that was produced with support from Maryland's College of Arts and Humanities and the Center fro Literary and Cultural Studies.

Inka Road Symposium 21 - Qhapaq Ñan in Chile

National Museum of the American Indian
This special symposium celebrates the opening of the National Museum of the American Indian’s landmark exhibition, The Great Inka Road: Engineering an Empire, with a fascinating look at the material, political, economic, and religious structures that integrated more than one hundred Native nations and millions of people in the powerful Andean Empire known as the Tawantinsuyu. In this segment, Solange Diaz, Universidad Andrés Bello, Chile, speaks on "Qhapaq Ñan in Chile: Management and Conservation of Atacama Desert Roads." Solange Diaz is an architect at the Universidad Andrés Bello. She holds a master’s degree in Restoration of Heritage Sites and Monuments from the Escuela Nacional de Conservación, Restauración y Museografía Manuel del Castillo Negrete. She worked for the National Council of Monuments in Chile from September 2006 to January 2015, where she was in charge of the Technical Secretariat of the Qhapaq Ñan. During her time there, she nominated the Chilean portion of the Inka Road network to be included in the list of World Heritage Sites. Now a private consultant, Diaz plans to continue her work on the Qhapaq Ñan through collaboration with government, national and local institutions, and with private partnerships and indigenous communities. The symposium was recorded at the Rasmuson Theater of the National Museum of the American Indian on June 25-26, 2015.

Inka Road Symposium 17 - Inka Road and the Andean Landscape

National Museum of the American Indian
This special symposium celebrates the opening of the National Museum of the American Indian’s landmark exhibition, The Great Inka Road: Engineering an Empire, with a fascinating look at the material, political, economic, and religious structures that integrated more than one hundred Native nations and millions of people in the powerful Andean Empire known as the Tawantinsuyu. In this segment, Victoria Castro, Emeritus de la Universidad de Chile, and Mauricio Uribe, Universidad de Chile, speak on "Inka Road and the Andean Landscape." Victoria Castro is professor emeritus at the University of Chile. She is an activist in the struggle for recognition of indigenous communities and in the pursuit of Chile’s identity as a multiethnic and multicultural country. Castro was a consultant to the UNESCO panel that designated the Inka Road a World Heritage site and an advisor to the team that created the National Museum of the American Indian’s exhibition The Great Inka Road: Engineering an Empire. Mauricio Uribe is an associate professor at the University of Chile, where he received his BA in anthropology and his MA in archaeology, and where he has been working since 1998. He is currently completing his PhD at the University of Buenos Aires, and he serves on the advisory committee of Argentina’s Archaeological Heritage National Monuments Council. His research focus is the Andean cultures of the Atacama Desert in northern Chile. The symposium was recorded at the Rasmuson Theater of the National Museum of the American Indian on June 25-26, 2015.

When Will History Repeat Itself?

Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory
Astronomers think that a supernova should go off in our own Milky Way galaxy every 50 years or so. When was the last one we've seen? Probably 1604. Yes, that's over 400 years ago. This being astronomy however, things will undoubtedly average out over the long run, but in the meantime, we're left without a recent supernova in our Galaxy to study. Luckily for us, astronomers from previous centuries were on the case.

M84 in 60 Seconds

Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory
M84 is a massive elliptical galaxy located about 55 million light years from Earth in the Virgo Cluster.

Landscapes in Passing Photographer Panel

Smithsonian American Art Museum
Landscapes in Passing photographers Steve Fitch, Robbert Flick, and Elaine Mayes will discuss their work. The conversation, facilitated by curator Lisa Hostetler, will focus on how all three photographers challenged traditional representations of the American landscape beginning in the 1970s, as they acknowledged the country's increasingly mobile society.

The Great Inka Road: Stonework

National Museum of the American Indian
Dr. Ricardo Mar, Faculty of Architecture, Universitat i Virgili, Tarragona, Spain, describes how the precise stonework of the Inka was accomplished. Produced for the exhibition "The Great Inka Road: Engineering an Empire" (http://americanindian.si.edu/inkaroad/), on view at the National Museum of the American Indian in Washington, D.C., through June 1, 2018.

Dorothy's Famous Ruby Slippers Were Originally Silver

Smithsonian Channel
Bright red is how we remember them, but Dorothy's famous shoes were originally silver. From the Series: America's Treasures http://bit.ly/2yxVgdF

Ghanaian durbar ceremony

Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage
On July 5, 1997, Asanteman Kuo, a Ghanaian immigrant organization in the Washington, D.C., region, held a durbar (inaugural celebration) to install and honor their newly elected leaders. This reenactment of traditional ceremonies is an example of how communities of African immigrants adapt traditions to life in the USA. The music and dance used in the ceremony are explained here. [Catalog No. CFV10002; Copyright 2005 Smithsonian Institution]

A Tour of M106

Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory
NGC 4258, also known as Messier 106, is a spiral galaxy like the Milky Way. This galaxy is famous, however, for something that our Galaxy doesn't have - two extra spiral arms that glow in X-ray, optical, and radio light.

G292.01 8 in 60 Seconds

Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory
This image shows how complex a star's afterlife can be.

M31 in 60 Seconds (Standard Definition)

Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory
This image of M31 represents a study of six elliptical galaxies that Chandra made to determine what causes an important type of supernova.

M51 in 60 Seconds

Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory
Hubble's image of M51, also known as the Whirlpool Galaxy, shows the majestic spiral arms that are actually long lanes of stars and gas laced with dust. The infrared image from Spitzer also reveals stars and the glow from clouds of interstellar dust.

Energy for Change Symposium 2: Ava Hill

National Museum of the American Indian
Across the globe, leaders and innovators are creating sustainable societies that include both environmental and economic success. "Energy for Change: Green Leaders Building a Sustainable Future" features expert, inspiring look at new projects that are helping to build a clean economy and promote local job creation, energy savings, and greater self-reliance in indigenous communities around the globe. In this segment, Chief Ava Hill of the Six Nations of the Grand River discusses the Six Nations joint venture with Samsung on Grand Renewable Energy Park, which will generate enough clean energy to power 60,000 homes and create jobs for Six Nations and the province of Ontario, Canada. The symposium was moderated by Tim Johnson, NMAI Associate Director for Museum Programs and Executive Committee member of the Smithsonian's Living in the Anthropocene Initiative, and recorded in the Rasmuson Theater of the National Museum of the American Indian on July, 18, 2014 as part of the fifth annual Living Earth Festival.
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