Skip to Content
  • Language
  • End User
  • Educational Use
  • Time Required
(146)
(334)
(422)
(369)
(467)
(10)
(194)
(148)
(81)
(238)
(95)
(126)

Found 480 Collections

 

Coins of Emperor Chen Tsung

Northern Sung Dynasty

Emily Pearce Seigerman
112
 

Coins of Emperor Jen Tsung

Northern Sung Dynasty

Emily Pearce Seigerman
179
 

The Race to Space: Understanding the Cold War Context of the Apollo 11 Mission

By using this collection, learners will . . .

  • Use primary sources to understand a range of perspectives on the Space Race.
  • Understand why the United States was concerned about the Soviet space program.
  • Be able to analyze the Cold War era context of the Space Race and draw their own conclusions about the success of the Space Race.
HeinzHistoryCenterEducation
22
 

Multiple Perspectives: Artwork of the Great Depression

In this activity, students will explore what life was like during the Great Depression through the perspectives of multiple artworks. After using looking strategies to examine six paintings, students will write a short essay comparing and contrasting these artworks while considering what art can reveal about life in particular time periods.

Big Ideas: 

  • How did perspectives regarding life during the Great Depression differ during that historical period
  • How can you see these differing perspectives through artwork created during the historical period?

Keywords: Public Works of Art Project, Federal Arts Project, Works Progress Administration, New Deal

Tess Porter
7
 

Shoes: Exploring Culture, History, Place, and Innovation

Teacher's guide for using shoes to explore culture, history, place, and innovation. Includes images of thirty shoes and three different strategies, located at the end of the collection, for using these objects in the classroom. 

Strategies include: a small-group object analysis activity; a poster, "If You Walked in My Shoes," introducing students to basic primary source analysis questions through six pairs of shoes; and a vocabulary exercise for ESL learners.

Tess Porter
33
 

Teaching Literary Devices through Art

A good visual can often be the key to understanding (and remembering) a seemingly abstract concept. This collection demonstrates how artworks in the Smithsonian American Art Museum may be used to teach common literary devices in the English/language arts classroom such as metaphor, irony, symbolism, and more.

Key words: allegory, allusion, anthropomorphism, foreshadowing, irony, juxtaposition, metaphor, mood, motif, satire, suspense, symbol

Phoebe Hillemann
29
 

Great American Short Stories Preview

The following paintings will be used to preview a variety of selections within a "Great American Short Stories" collection. Students will be divided into small groups, provided with a printed version of the painting, but no title, etc. They will together, create a "See/Think/Wonder." Each painting will then be shown  on the smart board, as the students share their discussion points. The class as a whole will then weigh in on the question/prediction: How do you think this painting represents a number of the ideas, story lines, themes, etc. featured in the stories you read over the summer? This is not intended to be a thorough review of the stories, but rather, prompt discussions to preview the larger unit.  As we conclude the discussion, the categories of  Place, Identity, and Conflict will be introduced - - noting how these paintings embody such topics in a variety of ways. This discussion then will also serve as an introduction to the entire course - identified for students as "Conflict and Conscience in American Literature."

For your additional information, the first six stories featured in our collection include:

World on the Turtle's Back (A Native American Creation Myth)

Rip Van Winkle (Washington Irving)

Young Goodman Brown (Nathaniel Hawthorne)

Tell Tale Heart (Edgar Allan Poe)

Excerpt from "Uncle Tom's Cabin" (Harriet Beecher Stowe)

Cannibalism in the Cars (Samuel Clemens/Mark Twain)

#SAAMteach

Annette Spahr
7
 

California: A Land of Opportunity?

As we continue to read "The Grapes of Wrath," I'd like you to consider the way in which California represents the "American Dream." How has this changed over time? Has California always lived up to its image? Consider who has access to dreams and opportunities in California at any given time.

After you look through the collection, choose one of the following assignments to complete and submit your assignment using the "Submit File" option that is part of the last resource. Hint: you may want to take notes and/or save images as you are browsing the resources here.

Possible assignments:

1) Create a timeline of "Opportunities Gained and Lost" in California using at least 8 images from the collection. For each image, identify who is gaining or losing an opportunity in this instance, and what kind of opportunity is being referenced. Remember this is a timeline and will need to be in chronological order by year. Complete your timeline with an image that you have found (from the Learning Lab or an outside resource) that represents California today.

2) Would you argue that "California is a land of dreams"? How could you change that statement to make it more accurate? Write an essay defending your statement that references at least 4 images from this collection. You may want to do some additional research to supplement your essay.

Tags: point of view, change, continuity, cause, effect, Dust Bowl, drought, migrant, migration, chronology, Steinbeck

Kate Harris
34
 

Self-Portraiture: Purpose and Audience

Without even perhaps realizing it, we create self-portraits all of the time - in the form of selfies, in photos with friends, or in photos of exotic locales. Every time we share a self-portrait, we have a purpose and an audience, even though often we don't think explicitly about those things. First and foremost, often we (understandably) want to portray ourselves positively, as attractive and interesting people. Sometimes, however, our purpose is more complex, even if we don't realize it consciously. Let's take a look at three different types of self-portraits to gain a better understanding of purpose and audience. 

This collection was created in conjunction with the National Portrait Gallery's 2018 Learning to Look Summer Teacher Institute.

#NPGTeach

Sherry Brown
9
 

Changing Places and Never Let Me Go

Hey Guys!

Here is your challenge for the day.  

You are going to look at a series of photos today taken at the same location over multiple years. The photos are in chronological order.  Take your time to look at each photo carefully to spot the changes that you see.  Look at each photo individually and then look at the series as a whole. At the end of the series, I want you to write down some of the ways in which the series of photos reflects the characters, plot, and/or major themes of Never Let Me Go.  Be prepared to share with your neighbors some of what you experienced.

If you finish early, take a look at the painting titled "Waiting Room."  What parallels do you see between Never Let Me Go and the thematic elements present in the painting?  Be prepared to share.

#SAAMteach

Michelle Fortier
7
 

Crossing the Delaware...

Mai Khanh Nguyen
2
 

The Paradox of Liberty: The Declaration of Independence and Slavery

This collection will be used to supplement students' rhetorical analysis of The Declaration of Independence. Earlier in the year, students discussed the paradoxical nature of the Puritans arriving in the New World to escape religious intolerance, yet they were exceedingly intolerant of other religions (i.e., Quakers). In a similar fashion, we'll examine the Declaration of Independence and a critical portion deliberately removed: references to abolishing slavery. We will examine a variety of works of art, noting the clues they give us regarding our founding fathers' often complex ideologies. #SAAMteach

Annette Spahr
9
 

America's Romanticism & Renaissance Period

This collection of paintings is intended to inspire conversations about various historical events, social, intellectual, and political movements which helped prompt a tremendous growth in American literature during the period between the early 1800's and the start of Civil War (approximately 1860's).

Annette Spahr
22
 

Who is to blame for WWI?

Who is to blame for WWI? Is it Gavrilo Princip, for assassinating the archduke? Surely that’s much too simple? We like to identify “good guys” and “bad guys,” but is there danger is that? The reparations laid on Germany in the Treaty of Versailles, most historians agree, contributed to WWII... Can any one person, group of people, country, truly take the blame for such a crisis? Should they? Who should have stopped it? #Teaching Inquiry

Melissa Kozlowski Ziobro
16
 

SOB, SOB and Homegoing: Black Representation and Identity in African and African American Art

The collection contains work from an SAAM summer session from 2018 inspired by SOB,SOB by Marshall and is centered around the reading of Homegoing by Yaa Gyasi. It is meant to be a resource for teachers seeking to consider identity critically, incorporate meaningful diversity, and promote the importance of complex representation. #SAAMteach

Loren Lee
76
 

Design Camp 2018 - Week 5 | Ages 9-12

Typography Today

A new “type” of camp activity! Discover the creativity of designing type and lettering. From cursive to calligraphy, campers will learn about typography through gallery explorations and off-site field trips and create their own letterforms.

Project Partner Aditi Panchal

Aditi Panchal is a Hand Lettering artist and designer based in Oklahoma City. Along with being a full time graphic designer, she owns Aditi Panchal Designs, a business that allows her to design stationery and paper products.

About Design Camp

Is your child a designer, tinkerer, or creative thinker? Cooper Hewitt Design Camp offers week-long immersions in the latest advances in design. Guest designers share their problem-solving strategies and engage campers in fun, real-life design challenges. Campers will receive special access to the museum’s permanent collection and enjoy exciting collaborations.

Why Cooper Hewitt Design Camp?

At Cooper Hewitt Design Camp, we equip students with the tools necessary to tackle age-appropriate challenges, work collaboratively, and think creatively.  Campers master a four-step design process—defining problems, generating ideas, prototyping/making, and testing/evaluating—through a series of fun exercises and design challenges.  Each project is carefully crafted to introduce children to design vocabulary, techniques, and processes unique to Cooper Hewitt and applicable to future school assignments and personal explorations.


#chdesigncamp

Cooper Hewitt Education Department
18
 

Prototyping

#designthinking

Cooper Hewitt Education Department
16
 

Allensworth Collection

Allensworth, CA. founded in 1908, represents the only all black township in California; founded, built, governed and populated by African Americans. Located in the great central valley (southern San Joaquin), it was founded to be a agricultural community and center of learning. Where, African Americans only 50 years out of slavery could become economically free. Due to lack of a dependable water supply, the untimely death of the Colonel and other factors the town's future was bleak. By 1918 the town began its demise struggling to survive. The historic portions of the town became a state historic park in the 1970's. It is formally listed on the National Register of Historic Places and is a California Historic Landmark. Here is a link to the park site, where you will find contact information for park ranger Steve Ptomey who developed this collection and manages the Allensworth State Historic Park.

Steven Ptomey
29
 

2H Course Themes

Megan Dawson
20
 

Mike's Test Version_Storytelling Training: Creating Your Story

Whether you're participating in the Stories: YES program in conjunction with a Museum on Main Street exhibition or creating digital stories on your own, the six modules in the Storytelling Training Series will help you think through everything to help get started. Ready to start developing your story? In this short course, you'll get some tips on how to create a story board, writing a non-fiction script, and more. 

This training module was created by the Smithsonian's Museum on Main Street program, a part of the Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service, in conjunction with the MuseWeb Foundation.

Michael Cieslak
27
 

Thinking About "The Way We Worked"

In this short course, you'll learn about topics that inspired the traveling exhibition "The Way We Worked," produced by Museum on Main Street at the Smithsonian. 

This training module was created by the Smithsonian's Museum on Main Street program, a part of the Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service, in conjunction with the MuseWeb Foundation.

SITES Museum on Main Street
28
 

The Way They Was- Thematic Links to To Kill a Mockingbird

This collection contains the provocative piece The Way They Was and asks students to make parallels to the novel To Kill a Mockingbird. It uses thinking routines such as "See/Think/Wonder", "Circle of Viewpoints", and "Claim/Support/Question". There is also a graphic organizer in the shape of a door that allows students to record the connections they see between the piece of art and the novel. This lesson can be used after Chapter 25 or at the end of the novel.

#SAAMteach

Sara Katlen
4
 

Socially Constructed Learning Through Art

Visual art is a language that is socially and culturally constructed.  Socially constructed learning values diverse perspectives, engages with local and global experts, and employs inquiry, discovery and exploration to move students toward global citizenship.  Because the visual arts leverage the power of dialogue and debate to sharpen critical thinking, starting with the arts is a logical place to help students develop empathy for others while increasing their cultural intelligence.

This collection was created to support teachers and administrators who wish to better understand the various cultures in their schools.  Using both Project Zero's Global Thinking Routines and strategies from Amy E. Herman's Visual Intelligence book, participants will practice articulating cultural perspectives and communicating across differences using artwork and primary sources from the vast collections of the Smithsonian Learning Lab.  Participants will learn how to read a work of art, understand compositional hierarchy, and question what is missing.  The frameworks provided by Project Zero and Amy E. Herman will allow everyone, even those not accustomed to discussing art, a place from which to begin using art as a foundation for building culturally-responsive curriculum.

Participants will see museums as the cultural ambassadors that they are and ask whose culture is being represented and whose is missing and why.  Extending from this inquiry, participants will recognize the role schools play in nurturing and shaping the lives and identities of our students.

Julie Sawyer
24
97-120 of 480 Collections