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Found 1,204 Collections

 

Artful Animals: Storytelling and Symbol

This student activity explores African animal symbolism through visual art and folktales. Twelve animals are profiled, including leopards, primates, spiders, chameleons, and the mythical chi wara. Includes objects, an audio folktale ('The Leopard’s Drum’), short answer questions, a creative writing exercise, and opportunities to learn more.

Tag: Africa

This collection was created to support the 2016 CCSSO Teachers of the Year Day at the Smithsonian.
Deborah Stokes
20
 

Teaching Resources: Artful Animals

This topical collection gathers resources related to animal meanings and motifs in African art. Includes art objects related to 30 animals (real and mythical!), information on symbolism, a map of Africa, activities, audio, folktales, a guide on how to look at African art, and links to other teaching resources on Artful Animals.

Tag: Africa

This collection was created to support the 2016 CCSSO Teachers of the Year Day at the Smithsonian.
Deborah Stokes
40
 

Identifying Characteristics of Renaissance Art

This collection will teach you about how Renaissance artists changed the style and focus of art in the period between 1300 and 1600 CE. When you are done, you should be able to thoroughly answer the question: How did the art of the Renaissance reflect the new emphasis on humanism and science?

First, review the painting, Raphael's School of Athens, and learn about the new techniques used.
Then study the additional works in the collection and try to use them as examples of the different techniques. Some of the works are from the Renaissance period and others are more modern interpretations. A worksheet is included at the end of this collection to record your work.
Finally, test your knowledge with a quick quiz. Use your worksheet to help!
Kate Harris
11
 

Artful Thinking About America's Capital City

What do you think you know about Washington, D.C.? This collection is designed to help students develop and practice their skills for examining and thinking about art that was created to represent America's Capital City.
Linda Muller
9
 

"...Give Me Liberty or Give Me Death!"

This teaching collection includes resources such as postage stamps, artworks and dramatic readings related to Patrick Henry, a Founding Father of the United States, who famously ended his speech at the Virginia Convention on March 23, 1775, with the phrase "...give me liberty or give me death." Also included are suggested Speech Analysis Questions from ReadWriteThink to support careful examination of Henry's speeches. Guiding Question: How did this speech inspire change in the colonies? Use textual evidence to support your answer.
Ashley Naranjo
8
 

Thomas Paine's "Common Sense"

This teaching collection includes resources such as a dramatic reading, an online exhibition, a postage stamp, and an article related to Thomas Paine, a Founding Father of the United States, who famously authored the influential pamphlet, "Common Sense". Also includes excerpts of "Common Sense" and a Document Analysis Sheet with suggested questions for in-depth examination. Guiding Question: How did this document inspire change in the colonies? Use textual evidence to support your answer.
Ashley Naranjo
7
 

Photograph Analysis: Migrant Workers in the Great Depression

This collection includes only one image and is intended as a discussion-based warm-up to a lesson on the Great Depression and migrant families. Suggested questions for discussion, a photograph analysis worksheet and a writing prompt are included.
Kate Harris
4
 

Objects that Changed the Way We Live

In this collection, we'll explore everyday objects and their impacts on society. Students can begin by reading an illustrated essay from the National Museum of American History highlighting objects that capture several pivotal moments in innovation. Included in this collection are the clock, the iPod, the bicycle and the cellular phone. What other objects have changed the way we lived?
Ashley Naranjo
11
 

Investigating a Place: Niagara Falls

What defines a place? Examine this collection of images from or about Niagara Falls to answer these questions: What are its unique set of physical and cultural conditions? How do these physical and cultural conditions interact? How is Niagara Falls connected to other places? What are the consequences of human activity on the cultural and physical landscape? Ask students individually or in small groups to create a collection in Learning Lab to represent the physical and cultural characteristics of another place. Using these collections, ask students to write summary statements describing the unique human and physical characteristics of places researched. In class discuss student collections and what makes each place unique.
Stephanie Norby
17
 

Droughts and Dust Bowls

This is a collection of teaching resources about droughts and the Dust Bowl. While it is mainly focused on 20th century American history, there are also some links to articles that cover droughts more broadly across time and cultures. I have included some artists (Woody Guthrie, John Steinbeck, nda Dorothea Lange) who recorded the effects of the Dust Bowl on American society. There is also a selection of lesson plans and videos that explain how farming practices and environmental changes lead to droughts, and how people have responded by changing practices and developing new technologies.

Resources in this collection might be used in Language Arts, Social Studies, or Science classrooms. Questions to consider might include:
-How do people impact their environment?
-How do changes to the environment impact peoples' lives?
-How did government and society respond to the disaster of the Dust Bowl?
-What is government's responsibility in times of natural disaster?
-What steps can be taken to prevent future environmental disasters?

Kate Harris
27
 

Civil War Deaths, Pictured and Remembered

Inspired by a reading of The Republic of Suffering: Death and the American Civil War, by Drew Gilpin Faust, this is a collection that shows some of the shocking images the public saw of battlefield death, memorials to the dead, and a lesson plan on the art of memorials.
Michelle Smith
11
 

The Achievements of Ancient Mayan Civilization

This collection reviews the major achievements of the ancient Mayan civilization, including its great cities, use of writing, calendar, religious beliefs, art, and architecture. Resources are provided as a basis for student research. Several of the videos are available in Spanish and English and would be useful for a Spanish language teacher who wants students to research the Maya.

Guiding questions to consider while reviewing this collection:
1) In what ways did observation of the sun influence multiple facets of ancient Mayan life?
2) Which elements of ancient Mayan life persist in Mayan culture today?
3) How are art, religion, and architecture seemingly intertwined in ancient Mayan culture?
4) What are the various theories about the demise of the ancient Mayans?

This collection focuses on the achievements of the ancient Mayans; however, it is critical to remember that the Maya are a living people and continue to preserve old traditions while building new ones in the modern world. For those interested, here is a collection on the modern Maya: https://learninglab.si.edu/collections/the-maya-people-today/yKMyzCEPMadkGgA8.
Kate Harris
25
 

How Radio Changed America

The technology for radio communications advanced during World War I, but it wasn't until the 1920s that commercial broadcasting grew and everyone wanted a radio for their home. Radio had a huge impact on creating a "mass media" that bound together the nation. As students explore this collection, they will look for evidence proving that radio changed America in four different areas:
-Politics
-Entertainment and Sports
-Religion
-Advertising

Possible assignments using this collection include:
1) Writing an essay evaluating the statement "Radio created a mass culture in America."
2) Researching a particular figure in radio's early history and sharing findings with classmates.
3) Creating a 1920s radio program that featured key people and trends from the decade. This could be recorded and shared in the form of a podcast.
4) Developing a chart comparing and contrasting the impact of radio with television or the internet.
Kate Harris
25
 

U.S. Presidential Inauguration Resources

This teaching collection includes resources, such as video interviews with expert historians, artworks, memorabilia and photographs of the American tradition of presidential inaugurations, including the Oath of Office, the Inaugural Address, the Inauguration Parade and the Inaugural Ball.

Discussion Questions:
-How does a U.S. presidential inauguration compare to a royal coronation?
-How are these events populist (for ordinary citizens)? How are they elitist (for the high class elite)?
-Where can inauguration traditions be traced?
-What is required by the Constitution to occur at a presidential inauguration?
-What events have become a tradition over time?
-What objects help tell the story of inaugurations over time?
Ashley Naranjo
36
 

Remembering the Holocaust

This collection looks at the way artists have used art, literature, and architecture to memorialize the victims of the Holocaust and explores the questions around how an artistic work, memorial, or museum can try to convey an understanding of genocide.

Questions to keep in mind as you observe each work:
1) What is the purpose of this memorial? Is it to honor, remember, educate others, or something else?
2) On what aspect of the Holocaust does this memorial focus?
3) What Jewish symbols are present? What national symbols are present? Are there human figures? Is it abstract? What other features do you notice about this memorial?
4) What is the setting of this memorial? How does that affect its purpose and design?
Kate Harris
24
 

Analyzing Photographs Over Time, with the Scurlock Studio's Portraits of Washington, DC

For most of the 20th century, the photographers of the Scurlock Studio documented Washington, D.C.'s aspiring African American community and its thriving city life. Now archived at the Smithsonian, the thousands of Scurlock images reveal both the everyday and major moments in African American life for nearly a century, from social events, graduations, weddings, and baptisms to visits by dignitaries.

This Learning Lab collection includes several videos, magazine articles, and websites to introduce students to the Scurlock photographs. The collection also includes highlights of the archives and a graphic organizer with questions for students to think about as they analyze the images.
Ashley Naranjo
33
 

The Mexican-American War: Before, During, and After

The purpose of this collection is to have students consider the causes and consequences of the Mexican-American War. Students will analyze each item in the collection and determine whether it represents the time period before the war, during, or after. Then students will answer a set of broad questions about the war. While most items in the collection have accompanying text, students may need to consult their textbooks or outside resources in order to answer some questions.
Kate Harris
18
 

Water-Related Hazards: Tsunamis

This topical collection includes resources about water-related hazards and natural disasters, namely tsunamis. It includes videos and images of the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami and the 2011 Japanese tsunami, as well as the 1755 Portugese tsunami that coincided with an earthquake and firestorm all at once.
Ashley Naranjo
6
 

Slave Resistance

This collection includes items representing various forms of slave resistance and rebellion. Students should determine what kind of actions are pictured in the case of each item and use them to create a robust definition of slave resistance.

Guiding Questions:
What does it mean to "resist" slavery?
How did white slave-owners respond to such actions?
Is maintaining a distinct cultural heritage a form of resistance? Why or why not?
How do religion, art, and music encourage resistance?
Kate Harris
13
 

Lewis and Clark: an expedition across America

Who were Lewis and Clark? Where did they go? Why did they go? Who sent them? Who did they meet along the way? What dangers did they face? Did anyone help them?
This is a Collection of resources including images, videos, text, online exhibits, and a lesson plan that support Lewis and Clark's expedition across American in the early 1800s.
mrsjoyce
38
 

Expansion (1800-1860), Set 4

Set 4 of 4
Jeff Holliday
38
 

Expansion (1800-1860), Set 3

Set 3 of 4
Jeff Holliday
32
 

Expansion (1800-1860), Set 2

Set 2 of 4
Jeff Holliday
44
 

Expansion (1800-1860), Set 1

Set 1 of 4
Jeff Holliday
42
1129-1152 of 1,204 Collections