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American Revolution, Investigation 1, Events of the Revolution

This collection is intended to accompany a study of the major events of the American Revolution. In this study the following goals are targeted: 

Big Ideas: 

  • We must be alert, questioning, and thoughtful readers of history. 
  • All retelling of history is an interpretation. 
  • Historical context is critical for understanding artifacts and historical interpretations. 
  • History is multifaceted and can be understood differently from multiple perspectives. 
  • Historical events are connected to current events.

Expert Thinking: 

  • Analyze primary and secondary sources for relevant historical details.
  • Synthesize details to understand the story of America’s founding.
  • Explain and analyze cause and effect relationships across historical events. 
  • Interpret history using a variety of sources and understanding of perspectives, including: personal stories, events, and factual knowledge.

Guiding Questions: 

  • What forces affect historical change? (i.e. people, events, and ideas)
  • What are the important historical facts in the American Revolution? 
  • What events led to the American Revolution?

Standards: 

Section 1:  Colonial America and the French and Indian War

  • 4.7.1. Locate and identify the first 13 colonies and explain how their location and natural environment influenced their development. 
  • 4.7.10. Explain how the British colonial period created the basis for the development of political self-government and a free-market economic system. 
  • 4.8.2 Explain how political, religious, and economic ideas and interests brought about the Revolution. 

Section 2: Conflicting Interests 

  • 4.8.2 Explain how political, religious, and economic ideas and interests brought about the Revolution (e.g., resistance to imperial policy, the Stamp Act, the Townshend Acts, taxes on tea, and Coercive Acts). 
  • 4.8.3. Describe the significance of the First and Second Continental Congresses and of the Committees of Correspondence.

Section 3: Declaring Independence 

  • 4.8.4. Identify the people and events associated with the drafting and signing of the Declaration of Independence and the document’s significance, including the key political concepts it embodies, the origins of those concepts, and its role in severing ties with Great Britain. 
  • 4.9.6. Explain how the ideals set forth in the Declaration of Independence changed the way people viewed slavery.

Section 4: The Revolution, Briefly 

  • 4.9 Describe the course and consequences of the American Revolution. 
  • 4.9.1. Locate and identify the major military battles, campaigns, and turning points of the Revolutionary War. 
  •  4.9.2. Understand the roles of the American and British leaders, and the Indian leaders’ alliances on both sides. 
  • 4.9.3. Understand the roles of African Americans, including their alliances on both sides (especially the case of Lord Dunmore’s Proclamation and its impact on the war).

Section 5: Building the New Nation 

  • 4.10. Students describe the people and events associated with the development of the U.S. Constitution. 
  • 4.10.1. Describe the significance of the new Constitution of 1787, including the struggles over its ratification and the reasons for the Bill of Rights.  
  • 4.10.2. Describe the direct and indirect (or enabling) statements of the conditions on slavery in the Constitution and their impact on the emerging U.S. nation-state. 
  • 4.10.3. Describe how the Constitution is designed to secure our liberty by both empowering and limiting central government. 
  • 4.10.4. Understand the meaning of the American creed that calls on citizens to safeguard the liberty of individual Americans within a unified nation, to respect the rule of law, and to preserve the Constitution.

Usage: 

These artifacts are intended to provide students with a consistent opportunity to examine historical artifacts in order to make observations and connections to events of the time period. it is suggested that students examine 1-2 items at a time on a regular basis in order to evaluate each item as a historical source using a See-Think-Wonder routine. 

#LearnwithTR



Kathryn Mancino
27
 

American Revolution, Investigation 2, Retellings of History

This collection is intended to follow a study of the major events of the American Revolution. Students will examine different artistic interpretations of the American Revolution in order to consider how events are portrayed differently based on the author's perspective. In this study the following goals are targeted: 

Big Ideas: 

  • We must be alert, questioning, and thoughtful readers of history. 
  • All retelling of history is an interpretation. 
  • Historical context is critical for understanding artifacts and historical interpretations. 
  • History is multifaceted and can be understood differently from multiple perspectives. 
  • Historical events are connected to current events.

Expert Thinking: 

  • Analyze primary and secondary sources for relevant historical details.
  • Synthesize details to understand the story of America’s founding.
  • Explain and analyze cause and effect relationships across historical events. 
  • Interpret history using a variety of sources and understanding of perspectives, including: personal stories, events, and factual knowledge.

Guiding Questions: 

  • What criteria should be used to evaluate a historical interpretation? 
  • Why is a single source insufficient for understanding a period of history?

Standards: 

  • SSA.3. Students explain how the present is connected to the past, identifying both similarities and differences between the two, and how some things change over time and some things stay the same. 
  • SSA.5. Students distinguish cause from effect and identify and interpret the multiple causes and effects of historical events
  • CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.5.5 Compare and contrast the overall structure (e.g., chronology, comparison, cause/effect, problem/solution) of events, ideas, concepts, or information in two or more texts.
  • CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.5.6 Analyze multiple accounts of the same event or topic, noting important similarities and differences in the point of view they represent.
  • CCSS.ELA.LITERACY.RL.5.4 Interpret words and phrases as they are used in a text, including determining technical, connotative, and figurative meanings, and analyze how specific word choices shape meaning or tone.

#LearnwithTR

Kathryn Mancino
9
 

Mythologizing America

This collection is intended to follow a study of the major events of the American Revolution. Students will examine a set of 1860s era renderings of the major events of the American Revolution and consider what story these images were intended to tell about the creation of America. Students are expected to compare and contrast the images with their gained knowledge of major historical events to consider what goals a creator may have had in creating this particular set of images and whether or not these images fairly portray the founding story. In this study the following goals are targeted: 

Big Ideas: 

  • We must be alert, questioning, and thoughtful readers of history. 
  • All retelling of history is an interpretation. 
  • Historical context is critical for understanding artifacts and historical interpretations. 
  • History is multifaceted and can be understood differently from multiple perspectives. 
  • Historical events are connected to current events.

Expert Thinking: 

  • Analyze primary and secondary sources for relevant historical details.
  • Synthesize details to understand the story of America’s founding.
  • Explain and analyze cause and effect relationships across historical events. 
  • Interpret history using a variety of sources and understanding of perspectives, including: personal stories, events, and factual knowledge.

Guiding Questions: 

  • What criteria should be used to evaluate a historical interpretation? 
  • How can we interpret events to accurately retell history? 
  • When is an interpretation of history "fair"? 
  • What tools can creators use to convey meaning when retelling history? Why might they choose to present a certain perspective? 

Standards: 

  • 4.8.5. Identify the views, lives, and influences of key leaders during this period (e.g., King George III, Patrick Henry, Alexander Hamilton, Thomas Jefferson, George Washington, Benjamin Franklin, and John Adams).
  • SSA.3. Students explain how the present is connected to the past, identifying both similarities and differences between the two, and how some things change over time and some things stay the same. 
  • SSA.5. Students distinguish cause from effect and identify and interpret the multiple causes and effects of historical events
  • CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.5.5 Compare and contrast the overall structure (e.g., chronology, comparison, cause/effect, problem/solution) of events, ideas, concepts, or information in two or more texts.
  • CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.5.6 Analyze multiple accounts of the same event or topic, noting important similarities and differences in the point of view they represent.
  • CCSS.ELA.LITERACY.RL.5.4 Interpret words and phrases as they are used in a text, including determining technical, connotative, and figurative meanings, and analyze how specific word choices shape meaning or tone.


#LearnwithTR

Kathryn Mancino
8
 

Student Led Visual Thinking - Workshop #1

#SAAMTeach - directions are provided in the resources.

Leslie Schaffer
17
 

Mission Water System

Come along as we explore the science behind how water filtered, used and brought to the residents at La Purisima Mission!

La Purísima Mission CA State Historic Park
17
 

La Purisima Mission Church

Come along and explore the Church History behind La Purisima Mission!  In this unit, you will find a link to a Self-Guided Interactive Tour and numerous photographs that document the stories behind the Church at La Purisima Mission.

La Purísima Mission CA State Historic Park
28
 

Blacksmith Shop

Come along and explore the Blacksmith Shop at La Purisima Mission.  Are you ready?  Let's go! 

La Purísima Mission CA State Historic Park
13
 

Interpreting Early American Portraiture through Pocahontas

This lesson is to be completed in the final days of our Early American literature unit.  Students have been tasked with creating an "Early High School Journal" to mimic the different styles of readings we have completed.  The final task of the journal will be to create an author's portrait page based on the tone and characters they have adopted for their project. 

#NPGteach

Leslie Reinhart
7
 

Otzi the Iceman

Theories about Otzi #iste2016
Carrie Johnsen
7
 

Slavery in the Archives

Earl Brooks
21
 

Yes, David!

Carolyn Cugini
1
 

Great Depression

Lesson to help teach students about the Great Depression. In this lesson, students will be able to connect the Great Depression to themselves and the world around them today. This lesson is designed to evoke emotion and theme through use of color in writing, and help teach students empathy.

Christine Kohley
3
 

Montana Female Artists

Catherine Sorensen
2
 

The (Engineering) Design Process

This collection serves to give students the knowledge about the engineering design process. Students need to understand the process is different from the scientific method. 


#LearnwithTR

Katherine Dunn
4
 

How Did We Get Here?: Introduction to Flying Machines

This is a  collection designed to introduce students to the history of aviation as told through the lens of the scientific method-design process. Students begin by thinking about why is flight important in our lives, and how did we get to the airplanes we now know? Students look at the many designs that planes have gone through, and discuss why perseverance and problem-solving are important skills to have. They also see that teamwork, cooperation, and a desire to succeed were necessary for the Wright Brothers to do their important work. Feel free to pick and choose from the resources in creating your own collections:


Overall Learning Outcomes:

  • Scientists use trial and error to form conclusions.
  • Scientists test hypotheses using multiple trials in order to get accurate results and form strong conclusions. 
  • Scientists use multiple data and other evidence to  form strong conclusions about a topic.
  • Scientists work together to apply scientific research and knowledge to create new designs that meet human needs. 
  • Scientists help each other persevere through mistakes to learn new ideas.

Guiding Questions for Students to Answer from this collection:

  • Why is flight important?
  • How do scientists solve problems?
  • How do scientists collect data to help them solve problems?



#LearnwithTR

Katherine Dunn
8
 

What does it Mean to Be a Scientist?: The Scientific Method and Taking Good Notes

This is a  collection designed to introduce students to the history of aviation as told through the lens of the scientific method-design process. Students begin by thinking about why is flight important in our lives, and how did we get to the airplanes we now know? Students look at the many designs that planes have gone through, and discuss why perseverance and problem-solving are important skills to have. They also see that teamwork, cooperation, and a desire to succeed were necessary for the Wright Brothers to do their important work. Feel free to pick and choose from the resources in creating your own collections:


Overall Learning Outcomes:

  • Scientists use trial and error to form conclusions.
  • Scientists test hypotheses using multiple trials in order to get accurate results and form strong conclusions. 
  • Scientists use multiple data and other evidence to  form strong conclusions about a topic.
  • Scientists work together to apply scientific research and knowledge to create new designs that meet human needs. 
  • Scientists help each other persevere through mistakes to learn new ideas.

Guiding Questions for Students to Answer from this collection:

  • Why is flight important?
  • How do scientists solve problems?
  • How do scientists collect data to help them solve problems?



#LearnwithTR

Katherine Dunn
9
 

Design Case Study: LifeStraw

Explore the design story behind the LifeStraw and learn about the design process used to bring it to fruition.

Objectives:

  • Gain familiarity with the design process
  • Connect user stories to design solutions
  • Recognize the iterative nature of design 
Cooper Hewitt Education Department
12
 

Design Case Study: Zipline

Explore the design story behind Zipline, the worlds first national scale on-demand drone delivery service and learn about the design process used to deliver medicine to those who need it most.

Objectives:

  • Gain familiarity with the design process
  • Connect stakeholder needs to designed solutions
  • Recognize the impact design can have on the world
Cooper Hewitt Education Department
11
 

American Flag/Washington DC Flag Lesson, One or Two Part

With this collection, students will use a version of the Zoom In thinking routine to analyze several flags with an eye toward creating their own flag at the end of the lesson.

The Guiding Questions used in this lesson are:

-How did the United States flag change over time?

-Why do countries feel that it's important to have a single flag?

The Big Idea for this lesson is:

Simple symbols, like the those presented on flags, can represent a lot about a country's past and what makes that country unique.  

In this lesson, students will begin by exploring the collection and answering, using the quiz tool,  the questions embedded about the two early versions of the American flag.  The questions push students to analyze each flag, consider how versions of the American flag changed, and think critically about how symbolism can be used in a flag to represent unique and/or historical aspects of a country. 

Once students have completed the quiz questions, the teacher will call them together to discuss  the evolution of the American flag and what the elements of the flag's current and former designs represent.  The teacher will then turn the class's attention to the Washington DC flag and reiterate that its design was taken from George Washington's English ancestry.  Using this as another example of a flag drawing upon elements of history, the teacher will  make the point that the DC flag hasn't changed in appearance in over 80 years.  

The class will brainstorm what they feel are the most important and/or interesting aspects of DC history based on what they have studied.  They will then brainstorm symbols that could be used to abstractly represent elements of DC's unique past, status, and culture.  

Once a number of good ideas have been generated, each student will have the chance to create their own version of the DC flag, either modifying the exiting version of creating a completely new design.  On the draft sheets will be a checklist that focus's students attention on the  most important aspects of any flag, namely its symbolism and its connection to the history of the place it represents.  

If the teacher wishes to make this a longer activity featuring multiple drafts, he or she can consider looping in the art teacher to discuss concepts of sketching and design.  

#LearnwithTR



Peter Gamber
5
 

U Street Riots Two Part Lesson

These six images give a glimpse of the damage done during the 1968 riots on U street following the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King.  The images are all attributed to Scurlock Studios, which students will study more in depth in a separate collection.  

The two day lesson centered around this collection begins with a gallery walk.  The Guiding Question for this lesson are:

-What can primary source photographs tell us about an event in history?

-How did the 1968 riots change Washington DC?


The Big Idea for this lesson is:

One event can have lasting effects on the history of a place.

 Each student will have a packet featuring  six 'See, Think, Wonder' pages, and a final page titled 'Gallery Walk Debrief.'  On Day 1, computers will be set up at six tables throughout the classroom, with all computers on a given table showing one of the six images in the collection.  At the teacher's direction, student partnerships will have 3-5 minutes to stop at each station and fill out one of the 'See, Think, Wonder' pages.  

At the conclusion of the gallery walk, student will meet with their partner for approximately 3 minutes to discuss the important question on the last page of their packet: 'Based on the images you viewed, how do you think the riots on U Street changed Washington DC?'  Once students have discussed, they will have approximately 5 minutes to write at least two sentences in response to this question.

On Day 2 of the lesson, the teacher will use a projectable screen in the class room  to walk through the interactive Washington Post article about the 1968 riots, allowing time to pause and watch each embedded video and answer any pressing questions.  

At the conclusion of the article, students will spend approximately 5 minutes at their tables discussing how their understanding of the 1968 riots has changed or expanded based on the Washington Post piece.  The teacher will then lead a discussion that should convey, at the very least, the following points:

-The U Street riots were widespread and caused major damage to areas of the city including but not limited to the U Street Corridor.  

-Many business' in DC were forever wiped out because of the riots and entire neighborhoods took, in some cases, decades to fully recover.

- Martin Luther King's death served as the final straw for many African Americans both in DC and around the country who had long been suffering under the crippling effects of segregation, discrimination, and racism.  

- Following the 1968 riots, most white people left the city.  

Following the teacher discussion, students will have approximately 5 minutes to write down an answer to the single question on the worksheet titled Washington Post Article Debrief:  After viewing the Washington Post article about the 1968 riots, what new information did you learn about how the 1968 riots changed Washington DC?

#LearnWithTR




Peter Gamber
10
 

Scurlock Studios

This is a collection of mostly portraits attributed to Scurlock Studios in the early and mid 20th century.  The collection can be used as the basis for a one day lesson that touches on both famous African Africans in the 20th century and an interesting aspect of local, Washington DC  history.  

The Guiding Questions for the lesson are:

- Why was photography such an important medium in the 20th century?

- How did Scurlock Studios benefit not only the African American community in DC, but also African Americans throughout the country?

The Big Idea of the lesson is:

The way people and events are depicted in media can have a powerful impact on how those people and events are understood by the country at large. 

The lesson will require each student to have a computer with which they can view the seven pictures in the collection from Scurlock Studios.  Using the hot spot function, students will spent 15-20 minutes exploring the collection and the information embedded within.  They will then fill out the front side of the worksheet titled Scurlock Studios. 

Once all students have completed this portion of the worksheet, the teacher will pause the class to read the brief summary paragraph from the Portraits of a City website that gives background on Scurlock Studios.  The teacher will then have the students listen to the short interview with Scurlock's son describing his father (the teacher may also want to print the text of that interview contained on the website so that students can follow along).  

Following the interview, the teacher will  lead a discussion about the photos, asking questions such as, but not limited to:

What was your favorite photo?  Why?

What did you notice about these photos?  (They are mostly pictures of famous African Americans)

How are the people in the photo presented?  (In a proud, favorable light)

The teacher will then refer to the back side of the worksheet and lead a discussion around the two questions relating to the treatment of African Americans in the 20th century, and the limited availability of technology at the time.  

Once the teacher feels that most students have a general understanding of how Scurlock Studios helped disseminate positive portrayals of African Americans, he/she will give students 5-10 to write out an answer to the last question on the back of the worksheet: 

Why do you think Scurlock Studios was so important to African Americans in both Washington DC and across the country?



#LearnWithTR

Peter Gamber
11
 

Claims, Support and Reasoning

Introduction to the science concept of claims, support and reasoning.

Jamie Weber
10
 

Wounded Knee, Past and Present

Wounded Knee is often portrayed as the closing point of the wars between Native Americans and the United States government in the late 19th century. However, the place also marks a moment of historic protest. This collection can be used to explore the importance of place in protest movements as well as the history of violence and resistance for indigenous people in the United States.

  • How should the site of Wounded Knee be remembered?
  • Why did the activists choose to occupy Wounded Knee? What is the significance of that place?
  • How were the actions of the American Indian Movement activists similar or different to their ancestors? Consider motives, strategies, and successes, and partnerships.
tags: Sitting Bull, Oglala, Sioux, Lakota, occupation, massacre, DAPL, Dakota Access, Red Cloud, Kicking Bear, Ghost Dance, cavalry
Kate Harris
9
937-960 of 6,087 Collections