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Found 1,267 Collections

 

Machion Walls - African American Art

Machion Walls - The topic I chose was African American Art 

Machion Walls
11
 

Style of Revolutionary War Leaders

They all had well tailored clothing. Even though they lacked functionality, they had impressive style.  I wish society still dressed like this. 

Devin Jackson
7
 

Music and Musical Instruments Before 1865

This is a collection of musical instruments and the scores they played. Both American and Native American instruments are included.

ryan salter
10
 

Hudson River School

Today, the United States' borders are much larger than what they were 250 years ago. With the release from British authority, the United States faced the challenge of expanding westwards, bound by no outside law.

Art was perhaps the most compelling form of storytelling. Whether it was about certain war victories, discovery of land, or peace treaties, art was a popular way of depicting what had taken place.

Art during this era was also a form of propaganda: it had to be beautiful, depict the west as a place of grand spectacles and such. It shouldn't be a surprise to anyone that heavy romantic themes would dominate this era of art. This was called the Hudson River School movement, which often exaggerated the beauty of American nature. As a result, we get to explore three major themes associated with Western Expansion: discovery, exploration, and settlement. Examine how these pictures make you as the audience feel, and how it might relate to the successful expansion westwards.

Marjon Santiago
30
 

Documents and Photos of America before Civil War

My collection is a compilation of documents and photos of events happened in the United States History before the period of Civil War. Although not all of the items are made at the time before 1865, the content of these items represents the history figures and events of that time.

 The items are organized in chronological order. As you move through my collection, you will see pictures of Native American people with their interesting culture in dancing, hunting. Then there is an event I consider important in the U.S history, which is tobacco cultivation. This event leads to so much controversial history consequences. Then you will see a some funny pictures of daily life activities of American people in the 18th century: a dressing room, a letter, books about plants and animals discovered in America. The books contain beautiful pictures and detailed descriptions of the environment in the U.S in general. You will also see some silverware in the consumer revolution in the 18th century.

 I hope you enjoy my collection. I had a lot of fun doing the research. Some of the pictures remind me of the long and difficult process of development I hope you have the same experience and thank you for watching.


Quân Uông
11
 

What is art? #TeachingInquiry

1. Do you think art is universal in its qualities and nature?

2. WHY is art created?

3. Who decides what is art and what is not art?

Kaavya Lakshman
5
 

Representations of Affluence and Slavery in American Art

The enslavement of African-Americans is deeply rooted in American History. Slavery began when Africans were captured and taken via boat to Virginia to be sold off and put to work in cotton plantations.  I chose to contrast the two opposite ends of the spectrum in social class. This includes how Blacks were treated in all aspects of The Trade process. The focus of my collection is on paintings as opposed to works of literature because I felt that one  painting could embody so much more than words can describe and you can include your own general interpretations.

Itunu Talabi
10
 

The Great Debate: Portraiture and Primary Sources

This collection is created in conjunction with a professional development workshop facilitated by the National Portrait Gallery and Teaching with Primary Sources Northern Virginia (TPSNVA is funded by a grant from the Library of Congress). 

Have you ever wondered if a portrait is a primary source? In this workshop, we will examine portraits from the Portrait Gallery, along with primary sources from the Library of Congress, to consider this question and explore connections between the two distinct collections. Participants will brainstorm and come up with strategies to incorporate these rich resources into their English and social studies curriculum.  

#NPGteach

Briana White
66
 

National Breakfast Month: Highlights Collection

This is a Smithsonian Learning Lab topical collection, which contains images, text, and other multimedia resources that may complement the Tween Tribune feature 3D print your own breakfast, Use these resources to introduce or augment your study of this topic. If you want to personalize this collection by changing or adding content, click the Sign Up link above to create a free account.  If you are already logged in, click the copy button to initiate your own version. Learn more here.

Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access
31
 

The Renwick Gallery

musekooo
118
 

Community

community building in a classroom. what is our community? 

Christina Ratatori
17
 

Important events in the Revolutionary War

These are Key events leading up to the revolutionary war. Also there are key events during the war and eventually gaining independience from the British.

Courtney Jackson
10
 

American Art

In American history, art was an important aspect of everyday life for the colonists. Their expressions of art came in many forms such as sculptures, paintings, dishes, quilts and metalwork. As showcased on some the collections, they used this artwork to express their views on certain problems they were faced with such as the Stamp Act teapot. For other pieces of artwork it was a way to show off wealth. The dishes and portraits in the collection displayed a form of wealth to colonists in this period of time. Today, arts displayed in homes are still shown as a form of wealth. Although modern art is much different than those shown in this collection, these various forms of art have influenced the art we create today.

Maci Sims
10
 

Exploring the Science of skin color

What was the role of Science in the construction of race? How can various written works and works of art begin a conversation about race as a social construct? These series of activities allow for a dialogue about this complex issue.

This collection includes a three-part activity that can be modified by choosing to spend more or less time sharing out as a group and whether TED Talks are watched as a class or individually as preparation for class. 

Part I begins with a work of art to stimulate thought using the Project Zero Thinking Routine "See-Think-Wonder."  Students will then read an article and view an advertisement. Another thinking routine is used here to uncover the complexities of this particular advertisement. In the next parts, students view TED Talks followed by different kinds of media. Several Project Zero Thinking Routines can be used to stimulate and record thinking.

 

Part I: Identifying the focus and beginning a conversation

Starting with an artwork by Byron Kim and Glenn Ligon, students use the "See-Think-Wonder" Project Zero Thinking Routine to try and make sense of the image. After a class discussion, students should be guided to read a short article about skin-colored ballet shoes that would be more representative of the skin tones of actual ballet dancers. Teachers could choose to help students digest this article or move directly into the Ivory soap advertisement. Using the "Beauty and Truth" Project Zero Thinking Routine, students can uncover the underlying complexity of this image.

 

Part II: The evolution of skin color and telling the story of a work of art

After viewing the TEDTalk by Nina Jablonski about the illusion of skin color, students can reflect individually by answering the question "Why is it problematic to view race as a biological concept and categorize individuals based on skin color?" Then, using Project Zero’s "The Story Routine," students can create meaning for a work of art. Students can share out in pairs first or simply share out to the whole group depending on class size, etc.

 

Part III: Photography, an essay on color and race and a work of art from that essay

  Angelica Dass’s photography challenges how we think about skin color and ethnic identity. The TEDTalk describes her Humanae project and allows for further dialogue about the complexity of skin color. Teachers could choose to help students identify important aspects of the talk or move directly into silent reading of Zora Neale Hurston’s essay "How It Feels to be Colored Me." Students can use the "Step inside-step out-step back" Project Zero Thinking Routine to identify perspectives addressed in this essay. Glenn Ligon created a work of art using this essay and students can use this piece to further the conversation with the same thinking routine or simply as part of the reflection.  A final reflection about skin color and the social construct of race can be completed either as a group or individually using the "I Used to think…; But Now I Think…" thinking routine. Teachers should consider providing a more focused prompt that suits the goals/objectives of their lesson.

Emily Veres
12
 

Spotting Symbols in the Lansdowne Portrait of George Washington

Learning resource collection, which includes an iconic portrait of George Washington, filled with symbols that tell a story about early America and its first leader. Explore the ways that the artist uses symbols in the portrait to tell about the subject’s life, personality, and achievements.
Thomas Gray
7
 

Exploring Identity: How can portraiture conceal or reveal?

What is identity? How is it constructed? These activities investigate how portraits can conceal or reveal aspects of identity. How does the artist choose to portray an individual? How does the sitter choose to be shown?

This collection includes a three-part activity that can be modified by choosing to spend more or less time sharing out as a group. It begins with a discussion about identity, using the Chalk Talk Thinking Routine and a comparison of two portraits to further push students' thinking on how portraiture can both conceal and reveal aspects of identity. In the next parts of the activity, students are able to choose from a variety of portraits for individual reflection and then come together as a group to discuss a larger work to about culture and identity. Several Project Zero Thinking Routines can be used to stimulate and record thinking. 


Part I: Chalk Talk and comparing portraits

Students participate in the Chalk Talk Thinking Routine using the questions provided. A quick gallery walk where students circulate and read all responses can allow the class to get a feel for the many (or singular) perspective(s) of identity. Using the See-Think-Wonder Thinking Routine, students compare and contrast two portraits: LL Cool J by Kehinde Wiley and John D. Rockefeller by John Singer Sargent. Students can share with a neighbor and then out to the larger group or simply share out as a large group depending on class size, etc. 

 

Part II: Portraiture and Identity

Using the Individual Exploration of Portraiture worksheet, students can choose one image from the fifteen provided and spend some time exploring their selected portrait. Students can be given 5-10 minutes to interact with their chosen image. Using one of Roger Shimomura’s portraits, students will use the Unveiling Stories Thinking Routine to better understand the many layers to this work of art. Again, students can share out in pairs first or simply share out to the whole group depending on class size, etc.

 

Part III: Returning to chosen portrait and final reflection

Students will once again return to their selected portrait and complete the "second look" section of the Individual Exploration of Portraiture worksheet. A final reflection about identity and portraiture can be completed either as a group or individually using the I Used to think…; But Now I Think… Thinking Routine.

#NPGteach

Emily Veres
23
 

Conflict and Compromise at the National Portrait Gallery

This Learning Lab collection has been created to support the 2018 National History Day theme, Conflict and Compromise. Utilizing portraits and other resources from the National Portrait Gallery, this collection is organized by Topics within the Conflict and Compromise theme. 

Be sure to check out the following at the end of the collection: 

-Reading Portraiture Guide for Educators highlights close looking strategies that can be used with the portraits listed

-Conflict and Compromise In History Theme Book from National History Day 2018

#NHD2018 #NHD

Briana White
52
 

DuSable Museum of African American History - Will To Adorn

In 2017 teens from the DuSable Museum of African American History explored the city of Chicago to document the impact of segregation on African American style in across the city.  This is the final exhibition of their findings. 


This Will To Adorn project is a collaboration between the Smithsonian Institute, the Smithsonian Center for Folklife & Cultural Heritage, and the DuSable Museum of African American History.  


Tags: culture, style, youth, chicago, segregation, Will To Adorn 2017, DuSable

DuSableMuseum
40
 

How Posters Work

This collection is inspired by Cooper Hewitt's 2015 book and exhibition How Posters Work, written by Ellen Lupton, presenting works from the museum's astonishing collection of over 4,000 historic and contemporary posters.

In this student activity, you'll learn the basics of poster and advertisement design: how to tell a story, excite the eye, and use visual language to create emotional, effective design. At the conclusion of the lesson, you'll create a film poster of your own. This collection is perfect for graphic designers, illustrators, and enthusiasts alike. All you need is a passion for design, a curious eye, and love for a visual story.

Watch Ellen share her own poster design process in a hands-on design lesson here, or explore the original Cooper Hewitt exhibition

Marsha Hawkins
12
 

Labor Movements, Unions, and Musicians

Smithsonian resources that relate to labor movements, trade unions, and worker protests. The collection includes sites, sounds, and education materials. Topics include union leadership, labor music, historic advances in labor policy, service workers, and agricultural labor. The collection also includes creative depictions of kept figures in various labor movements and renowned labor musicians such as Woody Guthrie, Pete Seeger, and Joe Glazer.  

#NHD2018 #NHD #SmithsonianMusic

Meredith Holmgren
50
 

History of Halo

Halo is one of my all time favorite video games series. I've made this collection in honor of the original trilogy.

The series focuses on the main character, Master Chief, as he battles to save the world against the alien covenant and flood.

The first game in the franchise, Halo: Combat Evolved, released on November 15, 2001 on the Xbox and by 2002, 1 million copies of the game had been sold. Since it's release the franchise has been extremely successful. Since the first game's release, 11 more Halo titles have been released. These have been some of the best-selling games of all time, and for good reason too.  

Viktoria Rose Evans
6
 

A Special Place - Woodcut & Linocut Prints

View selected prints of different places, then discuss:

  • What is the first thing you notice?
  • What do you believe is special about this place?
  • How did the artist use composition to highlight what is special?

Choose one print to examine:

  • What kinds of lines, patterns or textures did the artist use?
  • How did the artist use tools to create areas of light and dark?

Apply in your own work:


  • What makes a place special or meaningful to you?
  • What clues will help capture the uniqueness of your special place?

ARTMAKING CHALLENGES:

  • Draw a picture of a special place using foreground, middle ground, and background. Use a variety of lines and cross hatching to create texture and value.
  • Sketch your special place, then transfer the design to a soft rubber printing plate. Using a lino cutter, outline the major areas and cut away areas that will remain light. Use a variety of lines and cross hatching to create areas of light and dark in the prints. Ink your printing plate and pull several prints.
  • Create a painting of a special place using foreground, middle ground, and background. Mix tints and shades. Use color to communicate an emotion linked to your special place.  

Jean-Marie Galing
14
 

Calculated Change

Through this collection students will learn about how people exposed systemic societal issues to advocate for change in policy and change in thought. The thread that brings these practitioners together is that they slowly looked at the issues, exposed the truth, and did not only rely on data but a combination of people, stories, to back up their claims and advocate for change and education. 

Amanda Riske
23
 

Communities of Style: Wearing Our Truth

  

The following collection will explore the "Elements of Style" in our community and the  political and/or cultural truth they represent from the perspective of Folk Culture Interns from The Dr. Beverly Robinson Community Folk Culture Program at Mind-Builders in the Bronx, as well as from local artists, family, style exemplars, and other community members.

 

George Zavala
37
937-960 of 1,267 Collections