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Found 3,247 Resources

contra-angle porte polisher

National Museum of American History

right angle slip joint

National Museum of American History

friction grip contra angle

National Museum of American History

Angle-Gear Motion Transmitting Device

National Museum of American History

Angling pliers

National Museum of American History

Prophy-Angle

National Museum of American History

Angled Graver

NMNH - Anthropology Dept.
“Register- Fourth Shanidar Expedition” from "IV Register of Catalogued Specimens, 1960" Ralph S. and Rose L. Solecki papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.

Angled Pipe

NMNH - Anthropology Dept.

angle tube for gas mask

National Museum of American History

Geometric Model by A. Harry Wheeler, Two Angles and Two Planes

National Museum of American History
To show relationships among planes and angles, A. H. Wheeler designed a series of what he called platform models. All of these had a rectangular platform, with other segments (often other rectangles) secured to it. This tan paper platform model shows two parallel planes cut by two planes that are at an angle to one another.

A paper tag on the model reads: 2A-2PL*.

For the pattern, see 1979.3002.109. The pattern is dated March 11, 1945, hence the rough date assigned to the model.

Petroglyphs of Lines and Acute Angles in "Zigzag" Pattern, On Parapet Wall 1922 Tracing

National Anthropological Archives
Figure 85 for BAE Ms 1832

Ink tracing

Petroglyph of Zigzag? Line and Two Acute Angles, from Loose Building Stone 1922 Tracing

National Anthropological Archives
Figure 81 for BAE Ms 1832

Ink tracing

Sketches, The Child, Saint John, and the Cross Supported by Flying Angles (?)

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
One side: the Child is standing in the lap of the Virgin who supports his extended left arm; he puts his right arm around her neck. Above, at right, is the cross motif. Other side, in opposite direction: Saint John as a boy, kneeling toward the left.

right angle handpiece

National Museum of American History

contra-angle handpiece

National Museum of American History

Contra-Angle U

National Museum of American History

Right angle bracket

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum

Geometric Model by A. Harry Wheeler, Two Angles with Their Sides Parallel but in Different Planes

National Museum of American History
To show relationships among planes and angles, A. H. Wheeler designed a series of what he called platform models. These had a rectangular base, usually attached to other rectangles and triangles.

In this platform model, a folded rectangle cuts two other rectangles perpendicularly. The model represents two angles with parallel sides in different planes. A paper tag reads: 266. A mark in pencil on the bottom of the model reads: March-3-1916.

A Boy Angling

Smithsonian American Art Museum

Indicator, Dive Angle

National Air and Space Museum
Air driven, 3 in. dia., vertical scale, range 0 to 90 degrees

Felsenthal High Angle Firing Table

National Museum of American History
The U.S. Army used this wooden high-angle firing table when positioning 155 mm howitzer guns firing high-energy shells. The instrument has a white coating on both sides. A yellowed plastic indicator has wooden edges that are held together with brass rivets. The top edge of one side has scales for 100 yards and for range. This side also has three sets of scales for elevation, 10MSI, drift, and TF (target firing?). The sets of scales cover the use of M1 propellant with a muzzle velocity (MV) of 2,100; M1 propellant with MV 2,800; and M1917 propellant with MV 2,370. The left end is marked: 29105 (/) FT 155-S-2 C7 RULE No. 1. The right end is marked: HIGH ANGLE (/) GUN, 155MM. SHELL, H.E., M101 (/) M1 & M1A1 FUZE, M51. The other side has scales for 100 yards and range along both long edges. The center of the rule has two sets of scales, both for elevation, fuze, drift, and fuze settings of M55 and M67 with M1 propellant. These sets of scales are marked with the letter N. The left end is marked: 29105 (/) FT 155-S-2 C7 RULE No 1. The right end is marked: GUN, 155 MM. SH. H.E., M101 (/) M1 & M1A1 FUZE, M51, M55, M67. The Felsenthal Instrument Company of Chicago made these artillery rules for distribution by the bookstore at Fort Sill, Okla., from World War II through the Vietnam War. For other instruments used to position howitzers, see 1977.1141.25, 1977.1141.26, 1977.1141.27, and 2005.0271.02. For Felsenthal company history, see 1977.1141.01 and 1977.1141.02. References: "Graphical Site Table," The Field Artillery Journal 35, no. 9 (September 1945): 548; accession file.

Chair with Angle Wood Arms

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
Armchair with wooden angled arms with straight front legs. Curved back.
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