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Found 301,542 Resources

Allegorical Figure of "Africa"

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
Female figure, black, with elephant-head headdress, feather tunic and leggings, holding lemon and sheaf of wheat, seated on crouching lion facing right; in background, a tree.

Spear money, West Africa

National Museum of American History
Various West African communities produced metal currency in the shapes of spears and other weapons for specific kinds of exchange, such as ceremonial payments for marriages (bridewealth). They were made from a range of metals including iron, copper, brass, and bronze. While they were typically not designed for use, they could be melted down and transformed into weapons, tools, or ornaments.

Nord Africa Aviazione Bengasi

National Air and Space Museum
Relief Halftone/Letterpress depicting airplane flying over group of figures and camels; rest of caption, "Linee aeree regulari con modernissimi trimotori fra bengasi-tripoli-sirite-derna-tobruck-cirene".

Fly Now: The National Air and Space Museum Poster Collection

Throughout their history, posters have been a significant means of mass communication, often with striking visual effect. Wendy Wick Reaves, the Smithsonian Portrait Gallery Curator of Prints and Drawings, comments that "sometimes a pictorial poster is a decorative masterpiece-something I can't walk by without a jolt of aesthetic pleasure. Another might strike me as extremely clever advertising … But collectively, these 'pictures of persuasion,' as we might call them, offer a wealth of art, history, design, and popular culture for us to understand. The poster is a familiar part of our world, and we intuitively understand its role as propaganda, promotion, announcement, or advertisement."

Reaves' observations are especially relevant for the impressive array of aviation posters in the National Air and Space Museum's 1300+ artifact collection. Quite possibly the largest publicly-held collection of its kind in the United States, the National Air and Space Museum's posters focus primarily on advertising for aviation-related products and activities. Among other areas, the collection includes 19th-century ballooning exhibition posters, early 20th-century airplane exhibition and meet posters, and twentieth-century airline advertisements.

The posters in the collection represent printing technologies that include original lithography, silkscreen, photolithography, and computer-generated imagery. The collection is significant both for its aesthetic value and because it is a unique representation of the cultural, commercial and military history of aviation. The collection represents an intense interest in flight, both public and private, during a significant period of its technological and social development.

Nord Africa Aviazione Bengasi

National Air and Space Museum
Relief Halftone/Letterpress depicting airplane flying over group of figures and camels; rest of caption, "Lignes aeriennes regulieres avec appareils trimoteurs dernier type entre bengasi-tripoli-sirte-derna-tobruk et cirene".

Fly Now: The National Air and Space Museum Poster Collection

Throughout their history, posters have been a significant means of mass communication, often with striking visual effect. Wendy Wick Reaves, the Smithsonian Portrait Gallery Curator of Prints and Drawings, comments that "sometimes a pictorial poster is a decorative masterpiece-something I can't walk by without a jolt of aesthetic pleasure. Another might strike me as extremely clever advertising … But collectively, these 'pictures of persuasion,' as we might call them, offer a wealth of art, history, design, and popular culture for us to understand. The poster is a familiar part of our world, and we intuitively understand its role as propaganda, promotion, announcement, or advertisement."

Reaves' observations are especially relevant for the impressive array of aviation posters in the National Air and Space Museum's 1300+ artifact collection. Quite possibly the largest publicly-held collection of its kind in the United States, the National Air and Space Museum's posters focus primarily on advertising for aviation-related products and activities. Among other areas, the collection includes 19th-century ballooning exhibition posters, early 20th-century airplane exhibition and meet posters, and twentieth-century airline advertisements.

The posters in the collection represent printing technologies that include original lithography, silkscreen, photolithography, and computer-generated imagery. The collection is significant both for its aesthetic value and because it is a unique representation of the cultural, commercial and military history of aviation. The collection represents an intense interest in flight, both public and private, during a significant period of its technological and social development.

Africa, A Political Jungle

National Portrait Gallery

Fly BOAC to Africa

National Air and Space Museum
Offset photolithograph commercial aviation color print. Image of couple taking picture of giraffes; couples perch in land rover. "BOAC" in red sans serif, the rest of the text in black serif.

Fly Now: The National Air and Space Museum Poster Collection

Throughout their history, posters have been a significant means of mass communication, often with striking visual effect. Wendy Wick Reaves, the Smithsonian Portrait Gallery Curator of Prints and Drawings, comments that "sometimes a pictorial poster is a decorative masterpiece-something I can't walk by without a jolt of aesthetic pleasure. Another might strike me as extremely clever advertising … But collectively, these 'pictures of persuasion,' as we might call them, offer a wealth of art, history, design, and popular culture for us to understand. The poster is a familiar part of our world, and we intuitively understand its role as propaganda, promotion, announcement, or advertisement."

Reaves' observations are especially relevant for the impressive array of aviation posters in the National Air and Space Museum's 1300+ artifact collection. Quite possibly the largest publicly-held collection of its kind in the United States, the National Air and Space Museum's posters focus primarily on advertising for aviation-related products and activities. Among other areas, the collection includes 19th-century ballooning exhibition posters, early 20th-century airplane exhibition and meet posters, and twentieth-century airline advertisements.

The posters in the collection represent printing technologies that include original lithography, silkscreen, photolithography, and computer-generated imagery. The collection is significant both for its aesthetic value and because it is a unique representation of the cultural, commercial and military history of aviation. The collection represents an intense interest in flight, both public and private, during a significant period of its technological and social development.

Copyright Disclosure for Orphaned Works

Whenever possible, the museum provides factual information about copyright owners and related matters in its records and other texts related to the collections. For many of the images in this collection, some of which were created for or by corporate entities that no longer exist, the museum does not own any copyrights. Therefore, it generally does not grant or deny permission to copy, distribute or otherwise use material in this collection. If identified, permission and possible fees may be required from the copyright owner independently of the museum. It is the user's obligation to determine and satisfy copyright or other use restrictions when copying, distributing or otherwise using materials found in the museum's collections. Transmission or reproduction of protected materials beyond that allowed by fair use requires the written permission of the copyright owners. Users must make their own assessments of rights in light of their intended use.

If you have any more information about an item you've seen in the Fly Now: The National Air and Space Museum Poster Collection, or if you are a copyright owner and believe we have not properly attributed your work to you or have used it without permission, we want to hear from you. Please contact pisanod@si.edu with your contact information and a link to the relevant content.

View more information about the Smithsonian's general copyright policies at http://www.si.edu/termsofuse

Africa by Imperial Airways

National Air and Space Museum
Offset Lithograph: Image of an airplane (Armstrong Whitworth A.W.15, G-ABPI) in background flies over a group of African women thrashing grain in foreground

Fly Now: The National Air and Space Museum Poster Collection

Throughout their history, posters have been a significant means of mass communication, often with striking visual effect. Wendy Wick Reaves, the Smithsonian Portrait Gallery Curator of Prints and Drawings, comments that "sometimes a pictorial poster is a decorative masterpiece-something I can't walk by without a jolt of aesthetic pleasure. Another might strike me as extremely clever advertising … But collectively, these 'pictures of persuasion,' as we might call them, offer a wealth of art, history, design, and popular culture for us to understand. The poster is a familiar part of our world, and we intuitively understand its role as propaganda, promotion, announcement, or advertisement."

Reaves' observations are especially relevant for the impressive array of aviation posters in the National Air and Space Museum's 1300+ artifact collection. Quite possibly the largest publicly-held collection of its kind in the United States, the National Air and Space Museum's posters focus primarily on advertising for aviation-related products and activities. Among other areas, the collection includes 19th-century ballooning exhibition posters, early 20th-century airplane exhibition and meet posters, and twentieth-century airline advertisements.

The posters in the collection represent printing technologies that include original lithography, silkscreen, photolithography, and computer-generated imagery. The collection is significant both for its aesthetic value and because it is a unique representation of the cultural, commercial and military history of aviation. The collection represents an intense interest in flight, both public and private, during a significant period of its technological and social development.

Copyright Disclosure for Orphaned Works

Whenever possible, the museum provides factual information about copyright owners and related matters in its records and other texts related to the collections. For many of the images in this collection, some of which were created for or by corporate entities that no longer exist, the museum does not own any copyrights. Therefore, it generally does not grant or deny permission to copy, distribute or otherwise use material in this collection. If identified, permission and possible fees may be required from the copyright owner independently of the museum. It is the user's obligation to determine and satisfy copyright or other use restrictions when copying, distributing or otherwise using materials found in the museum's collections. Transmission or reproduction of protected materials beyond that allowed by fair use requires the written permission of the copyright owners. Users must make their own assessments of rights in light of their intended use.

If you have any more information about an item you've seen in the Fly Now: The National Air and Space Museum Poster Collection, or if you are a copyright owner and believe we have not properly attributed your work to you or have used it without permission, we want to hear from you. Please contact pisanod@si.edu with your contact information and a link to the relevant content.

View more information about the Smithsonian's general copyright policies at http://www.si.edu/termsofuse

The Flowering plants of Africa

Smithsonian Libraries
Title varies: v. 1-24 (1921-1944) Flowering plants of South Africa.

South Africa Uncensored

National Museum of African American History and Culture
2012.79.1.5.1a: 16mm black and white film: this 16mm black and white film is an anti-apartheid film distributed by the Council on African Affairs. Edited by Hortense Beveridge and narrated by Paul Robeson.

South Africa, Upington.

National Museum of African Art
Digital photograph of wall and window onto which a landscape painting has been taped along the ledge.

Dolls of Africa / Freya Diamond

Smithsonian Libraries
Cover title.

A variant in the artist's Body of Work series, based on female artists and their works, this book contains six three-dimensional images of dolls found in Africa. 4.25 x 8.5" closed, extends to 20"; six figures. Flag structure. French Speckletone (text) paper used for the accordion.; King James (cast coated) for heads, bodies, and legs. All lined with French Speckletone cover paper. Arches Text Wove endpapers. Decorative paper-covered boards with paper title with a ribbon closure -- booksellers website.

AFA copy 39088016707531 is no. 3 of 11.

AFA copy 39088016707531 gift of Janet Stanley.

Bringing Light to West Africa

Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage

As Rahama Wright embarked on a two year Peace Corps assignment in Mali, she had every intention of seizing the opportunity to empower and transform the lives of countless women. Just how she planned to do it would require ingenuity, determination, and most importantly, flexibility. After completing her undergraduate studies, Rahama worked as a Peace Corps health volunteer providing pre- and post-natal care and support for the village’s health center.

While medicine was not her original course of study, her adaptable spirit allowed her to flourish in this new discipline. As she worked away providing care for the mothers of a Malian village, she contemplated how she could incorporate her interest in shea butter with her current position. She had already heard of shea butter and was very interested in learning more. She considered creating a secondary venture that would consist of a small enterprise development project, not knowing that it would blossom into a business that would generate income for Malian women.

Click on the image below to enlarge and view captions.

“Be flexible…There is a reason why you’re there!” was Rahama’s response when I asked what advice she would give to other Peace Corps volunteers. She recounts leaving behind many of the creature comforts we take for granted, like the bus running on schedule or the convenience of shopping. She emphasizes that every day brought her new experiences. In addition to being adaptable, she advises, “You don’t know everything.” While Peace Corps volunteers have attained higher education, they have to adapt to a completely new and alien culture.

Peace Corps training prepares its volunteers for the jolting experience of transitioning into a new world and how to understand new cultures and practices. It is important to couple knowledge with a willingness to learn more. “You can’t quantify your experience, you must qualify it…” sticks out in my mind as Rahama and I continue with our conversation. She explains to me that Peace Corps volunteers may become discouraged in their experiences. Volunteers, like Rahama, are often living in countries where basic infrastructure is lacking. This includes the running water and electricity we use freely every day. While volunteers work to transform the lives of those they work with, there are limitations. Rahama explains that it is necessary to focus on the positive experiences, and not dwell on what is beyond one's control. Peace Corps volunteers will have to learn new traditions, languages, and social norms. Rahama insists it was her flexibility and adaptability that allowed her to connect with community leaders, women’s leaders, and elders.

As her women’s cooperative continued to grow, Rahama bore witness to the transformation taking hold in her community. Women’s wages increased tremendously and new opportunities arose for all of them. Sending their children to school was now an attainable goal. The organization she founded, Shea Yeleen International, has now had over 800 women work in its women’s cooperatives in Mali, Ghana, and Burkina Faso. When I asked Rahama what “yeleen” means, she explains that it is a Malian word for “light/luminous.” While shea butter is known for its restorative effects on the skin and body, Shea Yeleen has been a source of light and warmth for the women of West Africa.

Katherine D. Campbell is an educational aide/facilitator in the Lemelson Center at the Smithsonian's National Museum of American History.

Copper bar, French West Africa

National Museum of American History
Copper was highly valued and thus a popular material for currencies in West Africa. West African communities created copper bars of varying shapes and sizes to use in general and specific types of exchanges.

Arab Town, Tunis, North Africa

Smithsonian American Art Museum

2 Rand, South Africa, 2011

National Museum of American History
One (1) 2 rand coin

South Africa, 2011

Obverse Image:South Africa coat of arms, inscribed in a square, with the motto "diverse people united" in Bochimans. On both sides, country name displayed in English and Tsonga.

Obverse Text: 2011 / SOUTH AFRICA / AFRIKA-DZONGA / ALS

Reverse Image: Greater Kudu and value.

Reverse Text: 2 RAND / ALS

Manilla, West Africa, 19th Century

National Museum of American History
Manillas were regularly used in exchange in West Africa, especially along the coast of modern-day Nigeria, from at least the fifteenth century to the mid-twentieth century. Cast from various metals, including copper, brass, and iron, they are crescent-shaped and resemble an open bracelet. They were produced by Portuguese, British, Dutch, and French merchants specifically for trade in West Africa. Manillas were used in everyday purchases at markets. They were also a central currency of the transatlantic slave trade.

Akan Gold Weight, West Africa

National Museum of American History
These brass weights were used by the Akan people of modern day Ghana and the Ivory Coast for measuring gold dust between the late thirteenth and early twentieth centuries. They were cast into geometric shapes and figures of animals and people. These weights set a standard for measuring gold dust and made it easier to use gold dust as currency. The weights’ varied forms reflect Akan culture as well as cultural interaction between West African, North African, and European traders over five centuries.

Rome in Africa 066 1972

Human Studies Film Archives
title from credits (published work)--archival collection

supplementary materials: publicity materials, books, photographs, sound recordings

Donated by Halla Linker Aguirre and California State University at Northridge, University Library in 2002

Television broadcast created by Hal Linker with his wife, Halla, and son, David. The broadcast begins in Tripoli, Libya. The scenes in Tripoli focus on the modernization of the city, including footage of a mosque and modern buildings, in addition to the city's ancient heritage, illustrated through shots of the remlibyaains of a Roman arch and a statue of the emperor Septimius Severus (r. 193 - 211). From Tripoli the Linkers travel to Sabratha. Footage shows the ruins of the forum and a temple and details of mosaics at the baths. The ways in which the Romans kept their city sanitary and comfortable are highlighted with shots focusing on the ruins of heated floors, pipes in walls, an aqueduct, and sewage drainage. Marble columns, statues, friezes, and gravestones are shown in detail. The city's large theater is also featured. Footage of the theater includes details of the mosaics at the adjacent baths, the audience seating, and the impressive stage façade (scaenae frons), which is remarkably intact. From Sabratha the Linkers travel to Leptis Magna, the birthplace of Septimius Severus. En route footage features policemen patrolling on camels and new structures, including a factory, a row of identical houses, and a mosque with detail shots of the minaret's decorations and PA system. There is also footage of a market, which includes shots of piles of pottery, bread, and produce, as well as crowds of men shopping and selling, and donkeys and modern cars sharing the same street. The arrival at Leptis Magna is heralded by a shot of a sign marking the ancient city in both Arabic and English (and Latin). Footage includes Latin inscriptions, carved marble pedestals, a large well in the city market place, and the seating and remains of the stage of a large theater. A large basilica is also featured, with close up shots of ornately carved columns. Footage of the different rooms in a Roman bath are featured, including shots of empty pools and high arched doorways.

20 Rand, South Africa, 2018

National Museum of American History
One (1) 20 rand note

South Africa, 2018

Obverse Image: Nelson Mandela.

Obverse Text: SOUTH AFRICAN RESERVE BANK / GOVERNOR / 20 / TWENTY RAND / MANDELA CENTENARY 1918-2018

Reverse Image: Young Mandela and his home in Soweto.

Reverse Text: BANKAKGOLO YA AFORIKABORWA / IBULUNGELO-MALI ELIKHULU LESEWULA AFRIKA / 20 / SC7214759B / TWENTY RAND / MADIBA / SOWETO / MANDELA CENTENARY 1918-2018

Design With Africa: Bicycle Modules

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum

5 Rand, South Africa, 2007

National Museum of American History
One (1) 5 rand coin

South Africa, 2007

Obverse Image: South Africa coat of arms, inscribed in a square, with the motto "diverse people united" in Bochimans.

Obverse Text: ININGIZIMU AFRIKA / 2000 / ǃKE E: ǀXARRA ǁKE / ALS

Reverse Image: Wildebeast.

Reverse Text: 5 RAND / ALS

New Diptera from southern Africa

Smithsonian Libraries

Bopyrid Isopoda from South Africa

Smithsonian Libraries
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