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Found 4,769 Collections

 

Environmental Impact on Native American Culture

Essential questions:

1. How are Native American groups defined by cultural practices?

2. How does the environment impact the culture of the people living in a region?

In this collection, students will analyze, compare, and contrast the similarities and differences of the cultures of Native American groups living in the northwest and northeast regions with a focus on food, crops, and natural resources, understanding how the environment influenced the cultures and traditions of Native American people.

American Indian Essential Understandings (Written by the National Museum of the American Indian Native Knowledge 360 https://americanindian.si.edu/...):

1. Culture is a result of human socialization. People acquire knowledge and values by interacting with other people through common language, place, and community. In the Americas, there is vast cultural diversity among more than 2,000 tribal groups. Tribes have unique cultures and ways of life that span history from time immemorial to the present day.

Key Concepts:

  • There is no single American Indian culture or language.
  • American Indians are both individuals and members of a tribal group.
  • American Indians share many similarities with other indigenous people of the world, along with many differences.

2. For thousands of years, indigenous people have studied, managed, honored, and thrived in their homelands. These foundations continue to influence American Indian relationships and interactions with the land today.

Key Concept:

  • The story of American Indians in the Western Hemisphere is intricately intertwined with places and environments. Native knowledge systems resulted from long-term occupation of tribal homelands, and observation and interaction with places. American Indians understood and valued the relationship between local environments and cultural traditions, and recognized that human beings are part of the environment.

Time: 3 class periods

Day 1:

Anticipatory set: Begin by viewing the “Food and Cultures Video” from the Pacific Northwest History and Cultures online lesson. Students should use the “Add 1” thinking routine after viewing to note the important take aways. After discussing, students can make a connection to their own cultural practices by writing about the foods they eat in their cultures.

Looking closely: Students can then read the essay written by Shana Brown to extend their understanding about the connections between foods and culture. Students should annotate the article using post-it notes to record connections, challenges, concepts, and changes to their thinking. They can then place them on a class 4 C’s poster to share out their learning during discussion. Students should explore the three case studies, using the annotation tools while they read to look closely at objects, images, and quotes. They can use the student handout to complete a case study analysis and support a claim that “Salmon is important to Native Peoples and Nations of the Pacific Northwest” with evidence from their exploration. Students can then read “People of the Potlatch” and represent the cultural practice of the potlatch with the “Colour, Symbol, Image” thinking routine.

 Day 2:

Anticipatory set: Assign students sections of the Haudenosaunee Thanksgiving Address to read aloud. When students have read the address, have them complete the “Step Inside” thinking routine about giving thanks from the perspective of a Haudenosaunee American Indian person.

 Looking closely: Students can read excerpts from the “HAUDENOSAUNEE GUIDE FOR EDUCATORS” with a focus on “Who are the Haudenosaunee” and “The Relationship to the Natural World,” and/or the “Celebration of Native American Food” article and create headlines for the most important information for each or all selections. When finished with the readings, students should complete the claims and evidence organizer to identify which foods were important to the Haudenosaunee people based on evidence from the text.

 Day 3:

Anticipatory set: Students should work together complete a Venn Diagram sort to compare and contrast Northwest and Northeast cultural practices/foods as review.

 Looking closely: Students will construct a compare and contrast writing explaining how the environment influenced the culture of American Indian people of the Northwest and Northeast regions using evidence they have gathered to support their thinking.

#PZPGH

American Indian Nations: Kwakwaka’wakw, Haudenosaunee, Cayuga, Mohawk, Oneida, Onondaga, Seneca, Tuscarora

Lara Grogan
12
 

Read and Write Qin Small Seal 认写秦小篆


About This Collection:

This collection was designed by Hongli Holloman, a Chinese language teacher at Washington International School, as a basic introduction to use learning lab for language educators. It is a collection of resources from Emperor Qin Shihuang’s Mausoleum Site Museum, the Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access, and the Smithsonian’s Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery. Each resources includes key information about the resources, as well as ideas for class discussion using Project Zero Global Thinking Routines, and class activities. Feel free to copy the collection and adapt it to your own use.

Keyword: ancient history; artifact; China; sculpture; Chinese; cross-cultural comparison; think puzzle explore; project zero; visible thinking routine; terra cotta; qin shi huang; shihuangdi; shi huang di; Qin Small Scrip; ancient script

Teaching Goals:

To help students review and learn about the origin of Chinese written language and the evolution of the scrips.

Students with proficiency level of Intermediate Low to Intermediate Med would have more reinforcement to advance to Intermediate High Advanced Low level. Please check here to get the description of ACTFL Proficiency Guidelines.

1. Develop international-mindedness through the study of Chinese languages, culture of China, and ideas and issues of global significance.

2. Enable students to communicate in Chinese they have studied to introduce ancient Qin dynasty and its first Emperor.

3. Encourage, through the study of Qin Small Seal, an awareness and appreciation of a variety of perspectives of people from China

4. Develop students’ understanding of the relationship between the languages and cultures with which they are familiar.

5. Develop students’ awareness of the importance of language in relation to other areas of knowledge, such as history and art.

6. Provide students, through language learning and the process of inquiry, with opportunities for intellectual engagement and the development of critical- and creative-thinking skills specifically using Project Zero thinking routines such as PARTS-PURPOSE-COMPLEXITIES, Looking Ten Times Two, THREE Y’S.

7. Provide students with a basis for further study, work and leisure through the use of Chinese.

8. Foster curiosity, creativity and a lifelong enjoyment of language learning.

Standards Targeted:

  1. ACTFL WORLD-READINESS STANDARDS FOR LEARNING LANGUAGES

Communication

Standard 1.1: Students engage in conversations, provide and obtain information, express feelings and emotions, and exchange opinions.

Standard 1.2: Students understand and interpret written and spoken language on a variety of topics.

Standard 1.3: Students present information, concepts, and ideas to an audience of listeners or readers on a variety of topics.

Cultures

Standard 2.2: Students demonstrate an understanding of the relationship between the products and perspectives of the culture studied.

Connections

Standard 3.1: Students reinforce and further their knowledge of other disciplines through the foreign language.
Standard 3.2: Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

Comparisons

Standard 4.1: Students demonstrate understanding of the nature of language through comparisons of the language studied and their own.

Standard 4.2: Students demonstrate understanding of the concept of culture through comparisons of the cultures studied and their own.

Communities

Standard 5.1: Students use the language both within and beyond the school setting.

Standard 5.2: Students show evidence of becoming life-long learners by using the language for personal enjoyment and enrichment.

IB DP: Language Acquisition Aims

1. Develop international-mindedness through the study of languages, cultures, and ideas and issues of global significance.

2. Enable students to communicate in the language they have studied in a range of contexts and for a variety of purposes.

3. Encourage, through the study of texts and through social interaction, an awareness and appreciation of a variety of perspectives of people from diverse cultures.

4. Develop students’ understanding of the relationship between the languages and cultures with which they are familiar.

5. Develop students’ awareness of the importance of language in relation to other areas of knowledge.

6. Provide students, through language learning and the process of inquiry, with opportunities for intellectual engagement and the development of critical- and creative-thinking skills.

7. Provide students with a basis for further study, work and leisure through the use of an additional language.

8. Foster curiosity, creativity and a lifelong enjoyment of language learning.

Hongli Holloman
22
 

Exploring American and Cultural Identity Through Portraiture

How do Americans identify as American?  In this collection we will lock at works by artists and ask how groups fof Americans from different Ethnic backgrounds perceive their American identity.  #NPGteach

Christopher Evans
13
 

The Great Gatsby & Modernism

This collection not only helps launch F.Scott Fitzgerald's great American novel, but introduces discussions regarding Modernism as a cultural movement, the urban environment, prohibition, and transition into the Harlem Renaissance. Use with the collection "The Gilded Age", as a conversation with students discussing the various world events prompting the emergence of Modernism. The collection includes a combination of paintings from the Smithsonian's National Portrait Gallery and the Smithsonian American Art Museum,  photographs I have taken, articles from the Smithsonian Magazine regarding The Great Gatsby and Fitzgerald, as well as some supplemental Google Slides presentations.  #SAAMteach

Annette Spahr
20
 

The Paradox of Liberty: The Declaration of Independence and Slavery

This collection will be used to supplement students' rhetorical analysis of The Declaration of Independence. Earlier in the year, students discussed the paradoxical nature of the Puritans arriving in the New World to escape religious intolerance, yet they were exceedingly intolerant of other religions (i.e., Quakers). In a similar fashion, we'll examine the Declaration of Independence and a critical portion deliberately removed: references to abolishing slavery. We will examine a variety of works of art, noting the clues they give us regarding our founding fathers' often complex ideologies. #SAAMteach

Annette Spahr
9
 

Political Cartoons - Imperialism

Collection of Political Cartoons from the late 1800s/early 1900s

Renea Reichenbach
9
 

1968 Washington, DC Riots

Genesis Powers
11
 

Unconstitutional Deportation of American Citizens in the 1930s (Santiago Chamu)Modifications

Unconstitutional Deportation of American Citizens in the United States during in the 1930's.

#LatinoHAC #LatinoHistoryArtCulture #UnconstitutionalDeportation

Santiago Chamu
20
 

Neoism

#Cieteachart

ANIYA HARRIS
10
 

Art + Tec

Marin Layne Williams
33
 

MetaRealsim

#CIETeachArt O H B O Y

CJTheCreator
15
 

Street Art

#CIETeachArt

Adrian Rodriguez
11
 

Digital Storytelling to Explore Latinx History, Arts and Culture

This Learning Lab collection was made to support teachers and educators participating in the "Exploring Latinx Artists from the Frost Art Museum Collection" Workshop, to reflect on their experience. This program received Federal support from the Latino Initiatives Pool, administered by the Smithsonian Latino Center.

This workshops is organised by the Patricia & Phillip Frost Art Museum and the Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access, and aims at sharing digital resources and tools for the classroom available from the Smithsonian Learning Lab (learninglab.si.edu). During the workshop,  co-facilitated by Dr Antonia Liguori (Loughborugh University, UK) and Dr Philippa Rappoport (SCLDA), participants will learn how to create a lesson plan using digital resources and how to enhance their students' learning experience through Digital Storytelling.

In particular this collection represents an introduction on how to apply Digital Storytelling within the Learning Lab as a teaching strategy and a self-reflective tool to stimulate active and deep learning.

You will find here:

- a short ice-breaker activity to start shifting from a cognitive appreciation of art to a personal connection to museum objects;

- some examples of digital stories made by other educators during previous Digital Storytelling workshops 'embedded' in the Learning Lab;

- a description of the Digital Storytelling process, with templates for storyboarding and a few tips for audio and video editing;

- some prompts to start drafting a script for the Digital Story that will be made in a following workshop.

#LatinoHAC

Antonia Liguori
20
 

"Birdland"~The Inspiration Behind the Song

Are you playing "Birdland" in your jazz band?  If so, this collection brings the piece, and the inspiration behind it, to life.  

~Listen to one of the original "Birdland" performances

~Read about one perspective of Weather Report and their lead musician

~See how the Jazz Club and Charlie Parker tie in 

~See portraits of the Jazz Musicians who have a connection with this piece 

~Learn how Bebop was created and about the men who made it happen

Angela Berger
11
 

PT 1 Triumph and Tragedy: American Industry

This collection brings together EDSITEment and Smithsonian resources to support the initial research into a project for National History Day 2019, "Triumph and Tragedy in History."

These resources - including photographs, objects, portraits, lesson plans, and articles - explore triumphs and tragedies in American industrialization from the late 18th century through the early 20th century.  Resources highlight influential industrialists called "captains of industry" by some and "robber barons" by others, catastrophes that occurred as a result of rapid industrialization, labor leaders who fought successfully for the rights of laborers dismal conditions, the origins of child labor laws, leading inventors and their inventions, and other important topics. The second tile of this collection contains questions to help with the analysis of photograph, document, artwork, portrait, and object resources. 

By no means is this collection comprehensive; instead, it provides a launching point for further research.

This collection was created in collaboration with EDSITEment, a website for K-12 educators from the National Endowment for the Humanities.

Share your National History Day collections and let us know what you think! Write to us on Twitter: @EDSITEment & @SmithsonianLab, #NHD2019. If you publish a collection on your National History Day topic, be sure to enter #NHD2019 in the description!

Tags: strike, protest, union, andrew carnegie, john d. rockefeller, j.p. morgan, cornelius vanderbilt, henry clay frick, helen frick, andrew w. mellon, newsies, newsboys, child labor reform, thomas alva edison, incandescent lamp, nikola tesla, electric motor, electric power, alexander graham bell, telephone, christopher latham sholes, c. lathan sholes, carlos glidden, samuel soule, typewriter, triangle shirtwaist factory fire, pinkerton national detective agency, matewan massacre, wall street bombing of 1920, boston molassses disaster, asa philip randolph, a. philip randolph, john llewellyn lewis, john l. lewis, frances perkins, samuel gompers i.l.g.w.u, international ladies garment workers union, david dubinsky, company towns, #NHD

Heather Sorrell
25
 

Learning Lab Teaching Collection for Frost Art Museum Workshop using Luis Cruz Azaceta's

This teaching collection is designed to be used in the Frost Art Museum's "Exploring Latinx Artists from the Frost Art Museum Collection" workshop on November 6, 2018, to guide participants in a looking activity and to demonstrate the range of tools available in the Learning Lab. 

It is adapted from a teaching collection on the same theme (Luis Cruz Azaceta's "Shifting States: Iraq" http://learninglab.si.edu/q/ll...) , which aims to help students think critically and globally using two Thinking Routines to explore the painting. The work is a metaphorical representation of the unrest taking place in Iraq, and more broadly, an exploration of the human condition during times of crisis.

Included here are an image of the work from the Smithsonian American Art Museum, an explanatory video with curator E. Carmen Ramos, a contextual video featuring the artist himself, three suggested Thinking Routines - "Colors, Shapes, Lines," "The 3 Y's," and "Headlines" - from Harvard's Project Zero Artful Thinking and Global Thinking materials, three other works by Azaceta in the Smithsonian collections, and an array of prompts and Learning Lab tools.

For use in Social Studies, Spanish, English, American History, Art History classes

This program received Federal support from the Latino Initiatives Pool, administered by the Smithsonian Latino Center.


#LatinoHAC

Renee Mills
20
 

Latino American Experience

#LAtino HAC

Nadyia Duff
19
 

Picasso Sculptures

The sculptures in this collection were viewed by me on a trip to Barcelona Spain in the PICASSO Museum.
Renee Mills
6
 

From a Different Point of View

This collection will focus on various perspectives and the viewer will discuss the significances of seeing art at all angles.
Renee Mills
12
 

Latin Fashion Illustrators

This collection sparks the imaginative mind of the vast talent in the Latin American Culture concerning the fashion industry. #LatinoHAC

Renee Mills
12
 

Dreams and False Reality Comes True

Latin Artist Salvador Dali created art with visual dreams that had Puns intended! Have fun following the mystery and imagery from these early glimpses of Surreal creations.
Renee Mills
12
 

Political Causes

The voice of the human spirit and the condition of life expressed by the heart of these Latin Artists.

Renee Mills
24
 

Today's Modern Latino Art

Street smart and brash with a fresh approach! This collection has freedom to express yourself all within the confines of our present society.

Renee Mills
7
 

Latino Family Stories through Art

Student activity collection analyzing the work of two very different Mexican American artists, identifying aspects of culture and exploring expressions about Latino experiences in art. Included in this collection, are five paintings highlighting Latino families, paired with observation and analysis questions and interviews with the artists, Carmen Lomas Garza and Jesse Treviño, as well as podcast analyses of the paintings from the museum's director. As a supplement, students could read a book by Garza depicting her childhood memories of growing up in a traditional Mexican American community, or lead a discussion comparing this artwork with other images of families found in the Smithsonian collections. #LatinoHAC

Renee Mills
30
73-96 of 4,769 Collections