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Found 2,036 Collections

 

Timeline through History

History has been a lesson for all of us. We see that history very closely correlates with the Biblical timeline of events. We'll try to trace some of those events in this collection.

Angelin Abraham
30
 

Viral Histories: Asian American Resistance and Resilience

What is our responsibility to examine the assumptions we have about others? 

During the COVID-19 pandemic, Asian Americans have been experiencing increased racism and hate crimes. While these incidents of increased prejudice and violence occur today, they reflect a long history of how power, prejudice, and public health have intersected throughout American history. For Asian Pacific American History Month, Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History held conversations in a series called Viral Histories: Stories of Racism, Resilience, and Resistance in Asian American Communities, with community leaders combating racism while serving on the front lines. Community leaders shared their first-hand experience with historians who connect these experiences to the past.  

In this topical collection, co-hosts Theodore S. Gonzalves, Smithsonian National Museum of American History Curator of Asian Pacific American History, and Lintaro Donovan, High School Student and Civic Leader, interview Russell Jeung, Professor of Asian American Studies at San Francisco State University and creator of "Stop AAPI Hate," about the impacts of COVID-19 and the rise of anti-Asian racism. 

This topical collection aims to contextualize what we learn from Prof. Jeung's interview by providing additional information about the Chinese Exclusion Act, the Yellow Peril rhetoric from the 19th century, as well as moments of community resilience and resistance. As you explore the resources in the collection, we ask you to consider this question for self-reflection or discussion: What is our responsibility to examine the assumptions we have about others? 

#ViralHistories

Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center
17
 

Viral Histories: Community Organizing in America's Chinatowns

What drives us to build community strength and resiliency during an emergency? 

During the COVID-19 pandemic, Asian Americans have been experiencing increased racism and hate crimes. While these incidents of increased prejudice and violence occur today, they reflect a long history of how power, prejudice, and public health have intersected throughout American history. For Asian Pacific American History Month, Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History held conversations in a series called Viral Histories: Stories of Racism, Resilience, and Resistance in Asian American Communities, with community leaders combating racism while serving on the front lines. Community leaders shared their first-hand experience with historians who connect these experiences to the past.  

In this topical collection, co-hosts Theodore S. Gonzalves, Smithsonian National Museum of American History Curator of Asian Pacific American History, and Lintaro Donovan, High School Student and Civic Leader, interview Max Leung, creator of the San Francisco Peace Collective, a volunteer civilian patrol group in San Francisco's Chinatown. Max discusses the impacts of COVID-19 on San Francisco's Chinatown community and how we can organize for our neighbors in the middle of a pandemic. 

This topical collection aims to contextualize what we learn from Max's interview by providing additional information about how Asian American communities have organized in the past and the present during COVID-19. As you explore the resources in this collection and reflect on Max's interview, we ask you to consider this question for self-reflection and discussion: What drives us to build community strength and resiliency during an emergency? 

#ViralHistories

Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center
20
 

Viral Histories: Filipino American Nurses and Healthcare Workers

What do we take for granted? How does this inform the choices we make?

During the COVID-19 pandemic, Asian Americans have been experiencing increased racism and hate crimes. While these incidents of increased prejudice and violence occur today, they reflect a long history of how power, prejudice, and public health have intersected throughout American history. For Asian Pacific American History Month, Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History held conversations in a series called Viral Histories: Stories of Racism, Resilience, and Resistance in Asian American Communitieswith community leaders combating racism while serving on the front lines. Community leaders shared their first-hand experience with historians who connect these experiences to the past.  

In this topical collection, Viral Histories co-hosts Theodore S. Gonzalves, Smithsonian National Museum of American History Curator of Asian Pacific American History, and Lintaro Donovan, High School Student and Civic Leader, interview Abigaile De Mesa, a supervising nurse from New Jersey about the impacts of COVID-19 on healthcare workers. 

This topical collection aims to contextualize what we learn from Abigaile De Mesa's interview by providing additional information about the US Philippine War, the migration of Filipino nurses to the United States, and how COVID-19 is impacting nurses today. As you explore the resources in this collection, and reflect on Abigaile's interview, we ask you to consider this question for self-reflection or discussion: What do we take for granted? How does this inform the choices we make? 

Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center
19
 

History Lab: Time Capsules

In this History Lab, we will think about how many objects can work together to tell a story. How does a time capsule help us to learn about the past? What would you put in your own time capsule?

To talk with us and learn about more time capsules, join us for the History Lab Debrief! Visit https://www.heinzhistorycenter... and look for the History Lab section to find the registration link. We hope you can join us!

HeinzHistoryCenterEducation
25
 

Great Changes

Participating in our government is a right built into the foundation of this country. The ideas of the citizens in this country have been spread and have made real changes not only in this country but around the world. Whatever face participation takes, whether it is voting, protesting, or just sending a letter to your congressman, it is vital for the system that is our government. This is a collection of some of the ways the citizens of this country have participated in our system to make their ideas heard and listen to.

Emma Mitchell
30
 

PS1 7 Conservation of Mass

Looking at an example that seems to defy the Law of Conservation of Mass--but it doesn't! Explaining what happens at the atomic level.  With thanks to Team Chemistry at Washington International School 

Chris Hunt
13
 

Photographer: Gilbertson, Ashley

#nmahphc

This is a portfolio collection from the Photographic History Collection of work by Ashley Gilbertson from his series Bedrooms of the Fallen. A specially designed wooden portfolio was created to hold these works. Gilbertson is a member of VII Photo Agency.

Copyright Ashley Gilbertson

For additional collections, search collections.si.edu.

Keywords: veterans, grief, death, memorial, memory, parents, young people, suicide, bedroom, domestic interior, bedroom decorations, masculine culture, masculinity, American flag, military personnel, Afghanistan veteran, Iraq veteran, photojournalist, photojournalism, documentary photography

NMAH Photographic History Collection
16
 

IB Literature Resistance Unit Resources

"[Resistance is the power and capacity to exert force in opposition;  iis the refusal to accept or comply with something; it is the attempt to prevent something by action or argument.]  When we talk about resistance to slavery, at first glance one might think this is a narrow topic, since slavery itself is such a broad subject. It turns out, however, that resistance actually impacted (and continues to impact) every aspect of slavery and its legacy. There is resistance during the entire time, from 1619 or so, when the first African-Americans are brought into Virginia, until slavery is officially legally ended in 1865 (with continued resistance with regard to slavery’s unfortunate legacy of Jim Crow laws, Black Codes and other forms of institutionalized racism, intrinsic bias, as well as micro and macro aggressions).  Though we must learn about the horrors and oppression of slavery, we must also learn about the resilience of enslaved and formerly enslaved people. Any study of slavery that does not include the consistent and concentrated efforts of the enslaved to resist is woefully inaccurate. The enslaved resisted. The formerly enslaved resisted. Today, the descendants of the enslaved involuntary immigrants continue to resist the oppression that is the legacy of slavery." 

Greenberg, Kenneth, Distinguished Professor of History/ narrator. "Resistance Means more Than Rebellion." iTunes app, 1, March 2018.

Sher Anderson Petty
12
 

The I in America

These pictures explain how your participation is important in America's government and future

Jeramy Perez
30
 

Re-Imagining Migration DC Seminar Series, 2019-2020: Session 4

What does it take to prepare our youth for a world on the move with quality?

This collection is the fourth in a series of five created to support the Re-Imagining Migration DC Seminar Series, held between December 2019 to May 2020. The seminar series is led by Verónica Boix Mansilla, Senior Principal Investigator for Harvard Graduate School of Education's Project Zero, and Research Director for Re-Imagining Migration, with in-gallery experiences provided by educators from the Smithsonian American Art Museum, the National Museum of American History, the National Portrait Gallery, the Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access, and the National Gallery of Art.

This set of collections is designed to be dynamic. We will continue to add material, including participant-created content, throughout the seminar series so that the collections themselves can be used as a type of textbook, reflecting the content, development, and outputs of the full seminar series. Please check back to the hashtag #ReImaginingMigration to see a growing body of materials to support educators as they strive to serve and teach about human migration in relevant and deep ways.

In this session, held online while we are all home social distancing in the time of COVID-19, we will

* examine how immigrant origin youth may be experiencing the epidemic

* experiment with a set of revised socio-emotional thinking routines, and

* gather your input about the ways in which Re-imagining Migration together with the Smithsonian Learning Lab and the National Gallery of Art can support you as you prepare to engage students in digital learning.

#ReImaginingMigration

Re-imagining Migration
29
 

Museum Hopping

I created this collection for families to do together while schools are closed. I will be making a collection a day while we are out of school. Today we will be exploring Smithsonian Museums. The idea is for families to look at the items in the collection and consider what they see in the objects and paintings, what they think, and what they wonder. Families can see the museums and explore the collections.

If you want to learn more about more about See Think Wonder you can click here to see a video of a teacher using the routine in her classroom.

Ellen Rogers
48
 

Japanese Incarceration

This playlist on Japanese Incarceration is designed for self-guided learning with intermittent check-ins for high school age students. The learning tasks are divided over five days, designed for 30-35 minutes per day, and build on each other. However, students are able to work on this playlist at their own pace. They will engage with primary and secondary sources as well as visual, video, and written texts. Students have the option to complete the tasks online by connecting through Google classroom or access Google doc versions of each formative and summative assessments for work online and/or offline. By the end of the week, students will write an letter to demonstrate their learning.

National Museum of American History
50
 

Subject: Activism

#nmahphc

This is a selection of photographs from the Photographic History Collection related to activism, protests, marches, and reform movements. 

See the Learning Lab collection, Annie Appelfor additional photographs of the Occupy Protests and Disasters for refugees. For additional collections, search collections.si.edu.

Keywords (subject): protest, march, anti-, pro-, activism, citizenship, reform, demonstration, marchers, political movement, political discontent, anti-war, Vietnam War, Occupy Protest, Occupy Movement, women's vote, suffrage, boycott, impeachment, segregation, Rhodesia, genocide, riot, racism, gay rights, marriage equality, anti-fascism, prohibition, abortion

Keyword (photography): gelatin silver print, press print, photojournalism, documentary photography, fine art photography, mutoscope poster, stereoview, stereograph


NMAH Photographic History Collection
76
 

The Early Effects Of Printing

Here is a collection of images related to the printing press from the 17th and 18th Centuries. The assignment is to select the three images which are the most interesting to you, and write a paragraph about each. In your paragraphs, start by explaining: 1) why you picked the image, 2) how it relates to the development of the printed word, and 3) what it meant for people who were alive at the time.

For added challenge, have the students finish the assignment with an additional paragraph (or more) explaining how each of the images they selected involve ideas or developments that still have an effect on their lives today.

David Wallace
10
 

Subject: Activism

#nmahphc

This is a selection of photographs from the Photographic History Collection related to activism, protests, marches, and reform movements. 

See the Learning Lab collection, Annie Appelfor additional photographs of the Occupy Protests and Disasters for refugees. For additional collections, search collections.si.edu.

Keywords (subject): protest, march, anti-, pro-, activism, citizenship, reform, demonstration, marchers, political movement, political discontent, anti-war, Vietnam War, Occupy Protest, Occupy Movement, women's vote, suffrage, boycott, impeachment, segregation, Rhodesia, genocide, riot, racism, gay rights, marriage equality, anti-fascism, prohibition, abortion

Keyword (photography): gelatin silver print, press print, photojournalism, documentary photography, fine art photography, mutoscope poster, stereoview, stereograph


Hayley Snyder
75
 

Teaching for Community without a Classroom: Leveraging Digital Museum Resources for Distance Learning

This collection serves as a companion resource for the Community Works Institute conference series, Teaching for Community without a Classroom. 

The session will introduce participants to the Smithsonian Learning Lab, a free platform that gives users access to millions of digital resources from across the Smithsonian and beyond, as well as the tools to create interactive learning experiences with them. This session will also include an activity exploring Luis Cruz Azaceta's "Shifting States: Iraq" to help students think critically and globally, as well as techniques to consider personal experiences and their connection to museum resources.

Included here are an image of the work from the Smithsonian American Art Museum, an explanatory video with curator E. Carmen Ramos, two  Thinking Routines - "See, Think, Wonder" and "The 3 Y's" - from Harvard's Project Zero Visible Thinking and Global Thinking materials, examples of activities using museum objects and personal stories, and supporting materials. This collection is adapted from a larger teaching collection on the same theme (Luis Cruz Azaceta's "Shifting States: Iraq" ( http://learninglab.si.edu/q/ll...), that includes extension activities. 

This collection was co-created with Matthew Decker, Jamie Gillan, and  Tess Porter.  

Keywords: #CommunityInVirtualEd, #LatinoHAC, Latinx, Latino, global competency, competencies, CWI, 3ys

Philippa Rappoport
24
 

Subject: Weddings

#nmahphc

This is a selection of photographs from the Photographic History Collection related to weddings.

For additional images, search collections.si.edu.

Keywords (subject): Wedding, marriage ceremony, church, gay rights, bride, groom, love, wedding dress, tuxedo, marriage clothes, wedding clothes, bouquet, flowers, tradition, anniversary, nontraditional wedding, wedding album, Tom Thumb and Lavania Warren, Leon and Sondra Einhorn, Victor Keppler, Lisa Law, Courtney Kennedy, Michael Kennedy, Ken Regan, Paul and Laura Foster, Mr. & Mrs. Patrick O'Brien, David Eisenhower and Juile Nixon

Keywords (photography): wedding album, portraiture, traditional photography, advertising, color photography, color carbro, gelatin silver print, press print, documentary photography, mutoscope poster, stereoview, genre scene, pictorialism, carte-de-visite, 

NMAH Photographic History Collection
51
 

Cultures

This playlist on different cultures in the United States is designed for self-guided learning with intermittent check-ins for elementary age students. The learning tasks are divided over five days, designed for 30-35 minutes per day, and build on each other. However, students are able to work on this playlist at their own pace. Students have the option to complete the tasks online by connecting through Google classroom or access Google doc versions of each formative and summative assessments for work online and/or offline. By the end of the week, students will write a brief constructed response on why it is important to acknowledge and appreciate the different cultures that exist in the United States.

  • Formative assessments are represented by a chevron (Learning Check In and Tasks).
  • Summative assessments are represented by a circle (Final Task).
  • Google doc versions of all formative and summative assessments are in the tiles immediately after the digital versions. 

*Social Studies and Visual Arts standards vary by state for elementary grades. We recommend educators and caregivers consult their student and child's state standards for these two subjects.

National Museum of American History
63
 

Formats and Processes: Cartes-de-visite

#nmahphc

This is a selection of cartes-de-visite from the Photographic History Collection.

The sitters and photographers in this Learning Lab collection are well-known, lesser known, and unidentified. There are a number of photographs that are not portraits, including a stereoview of a cartes-de-visite studio.

Learning Lab collections, Seville CDV Collection and Photo Albums contain additional cartes-de-visite.

For additional collections, search collections.si.edu.

Keywords: CDV, carte de visite, cartes de visite, portraiture, studio portrait, collectible photography, celebrity photography

NMAH Photographic History Collection
120
 

Shaping America: Exploring Portraiture from the Colonial Era to the Civil War

Meet the politicians, reformers, inventors, authors, soldiers, and others who shaped the course of American history from the Colonial Era through the Civil War. Students will analyze portraits to learn about the diverse and significant contributions to American society made by individuals in the National Portrait Gallery’s collection.

#NPGteach

Objectives: After completing this lesson, students will be better able to:

  •  Identify important Americans and analyze their contributions to U.S. History
  • Identify key components of a portrait and discuss what we can learn about the sitter through these components

Keywords: Colonies, Revolutionary War, Westward Expansion, Civil War, Abolition, Suffrage

Nicole Vance
68
 

Subject: Civil War Photography: Seville CDV Collection

#nmahphc

This collection of cartes-de-visite portraits of Union soldiers is the Seville collection in the National Museum of American History’s Photographic History Collection. The collection was donated in 1931 by Smithsonian employee Marian Wells Seville, a Smithsonian library cataloger and assistant. Seville's father, Captain William P. Seville, served with the 1st Delaware Volunteers during the Civil War. Throughout the war, he obtained these photographs of the men with whom he served. Seville authored, The History of the First Regiment, Delaware Volunteers: From the Commencement of the “Three Month’s Service” to the Final Muster Out at the Close of the Rebellion, in 1884. 

The biographies of nearly all the subjects in this collection are attached to the record. Follow the links to "more info" after clicking on each image.

For more images, search collections.si.edu

Keywords: Civil War soldier, men in uniform, carte-de-visite, studio portraiture, mustache, military weapons, surgeon, surgeon-general., general, quartermaster, captain, heroics, Smithsonian history, women collectors, women donors, women librarians, use of photography

NMAH Photographic History Collection
29
 

Investigating the Layers of a Korean Buddhist Sculpture

This Learning Lab Collection focuses on a single Buddhist object from the National Museum of Korea.  Students will formulate questions about this work of art using Project Zero's Layers Visible Thinking Routine.  They will investigate answers to their questions by researching the exhibition website and engaging with videos, virtual tours, and other digital resources provided.  

#AsiaTeachers
Tags:  Art; Buddhism; Korea; Project Zero; research; National Museum of Korea


About the exhibition:

Sacred Dedication:  A Korean Buddhist Masterpiece
September 21, 2019–March 22, 2020
Arthur M. Sackler Gallery

A single object—a beautiful gilt wood sculpture of Gwaneum, the bodhisattva of compassion and the most popular deity in Korean Buddhism—is the focus of this loan exhibition from the National Museum of Korea. Carved in the late Goryeo period (918–1392), this crowned image is now known to be the oldest surviving gilded wood figure in an informal pose. Its posture, with one leg raised and the other lowered, is associated with the deity’s dwelling place, where he sits calmly on rocks above the crashing waves of the sea. The same subject in a similar pose was common in devotional paintings, such as the hanging scroll of Suwol Gwaneum bosal (Water-Moon Avalokiteshvara) now in the collection of the Freer Gallery.

Sacred texts and potent symbolic objects were sealed inside this hollow religious sculpture when it was first placed into worship in the thirteenth century. The practice of adding dedication material to a Buddhist sculpture during consecration ceremonies was believed to transform it into a living body. Recent research conducted by the National Museum of Korea provides new information about this rare sculpture, its hidden contents, and the special rituals that surrounded image consecration in Korea centuries ago.

We thank our colleagues at the National Museum of Korea for sharing their research and facilitating this exhibition.

Freer and Sackler Galleries
12
 

Dinosaurs are DINO-mite!

I created this collection for families to do together while schools are closed. I will be making a collection a day while we are out of school. Today we will be exploring dinosaurs. The idea is for families to look at the items in the collection and consider what they see in the objects and paintings, what they think, and what they wonder. Families can also watch a free Brainpop video about dinosaurs as well as explore PBS EON videos about dinosaurs. Families can learn about these prehistoric animals and consider all the evidence scientists have uncovered. At the end of the collection I have provided a few ideas for families about what to do next.

If you want to learn more about more about See Think Wonder you can click here to see a video of a teacher using the routine in her classroom.

Ellen Rogers
45
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