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Found 531 Collections

 

Dorothea Lange

A photographic study of the Great Depression.

Sarah Dahl
16
 

Aztecs and Coding

Here is a collection of coding games using Scratch interactive media using MakeyMakey , integrating Aztec games, culture and information.

In this collection, I am going to highlight Aztec games and culture to recreate  projects that I do in my my own design classroom with my students based on these historical artifacts.

This collection is hopefully an inspiration for young designers and artists to use designs inspired by the Aztec games and culture to make a Scratch game or remix with the examples I have posted in this collection.  This collection shows you a pathway to create coding and designs based on these  Aztec games and culture,  to create games similar in motif and structure to the originals. (This lesson is more focused on 9-18 year olds, but can be adapted for older students, as well as adults with some rewriting and restructuring, especially with coding aspect of the lesson.)

 You will be creating and studying these cultural artifacts to gain insight into how they were constructed, drawn, and fabricated. In order to gain perspective on these  cultures, the research your students use by viewing and constructing their own coded games/designs will give agency to their work, albeit through the eyes of these  people. The students will gain a new understanding and vision of these  cultural motifs and what they carry to the viewer.

Students will be creating and researching designs and motifs based on this culture. Once they have constructed and drawn an idea either through digital or non-digital means, they will be rendering their designs in Scratch or another coding app like Processing

The students will then use these coded games with MakeyMakey and a create a controller like these musical instruments/controllers my students created at Labz at my school Charter High School for Architecture and Design in Philadelphia.

Happy Coding!


#LatinoHAC

Christopher Sweeney
27
 

Women in Baseball and the Post Office

This collection explores this essential question: How was the changing status of women in American society during the late 19th and early 20th century represented in professional baseball and the United States Postal Service. In small groups, students will discuss this underlying question through the variety of resources in this collection, examining the historical access women have had to these institutions, their divergent experiences compared to their male counterparts, and how women have historically been depicted on USPS stamps. Some supporting questions to scaffold inquiry can be found in the “Notes to Other Users” section.

Jessica Rosenberry
28
 

Sites Unseen: Navigating Complexity and Grappling with Uncertainty

Trevor Paglen: Sites Unseen combines the disciplines of art, science, and investigative journalism to bring unseen and, at times, unsettling elements of our contemporary world to light. Zooming outward from personal, to local, and finally global implications of this work, participants will work collaboratively to identify extensions and troubleshoot any challenges of this content for the classroom.

All Grade Levels

Elizabeth Dale-Deines
15
 

Express Yourself: Creating a Graphic Novel Exploring Identity with the National Portrait Gallery

Considering the growing popularity of the graphic novel, could they be a venue for your students to explore and express identity? This collection offers interactive activities that incorporate building the structure of comic book and graphic novel pages. Utilizing the special exhibition Eye to I: Self-Portraits from 1900 to Today, this workshop takes a close look at self-portraiture as a means of exploring identity. The ideas here were presented by Sean Murphy, art teacher at Samuel Tucker Elementary School, in Fall 2018 and Spring 2019. 

#NPGteach

Briana White
21
 

Exploration of Different Gold Mining Tools and Techniques, at Columbia State Historic Park

Historical images of placer gold mining tools and techniques used, in Columbia, CA may be used for learning different placer gold mining techniques. These visual aids may provide a better understanding of how the types of mining tools changed over time, in Columbia, CA. As the California Gold Rush began miners traveled throughout the Sierra Nevada foothills, in search for gold. These miners traveled with very few items; some which included a gold pan, pick and shovel for easier travel. As more gold was discovered, mining parties established mining camps or tent towns; and, the cradle or rocker box was used to wash gold. Further development of mining camps brought in the use of long toms, sluice boxes and water diversions created for mining. The history of Columbia State Historic Park follows this storyline, but evolved into a full-scale mining town. Eighty-Seven Million dollars worth of gold, in the 1860s prices (Twelve to Sixteen dollars per ounce vs. current price of gold is over One Thousand dollars) was extracted from Columbia, CA. The amount of gold not only attracted miners, but business people, as well. In the mid 1850s, brick buildings with iron doors were built to provide more stable structures for the strong merchant economy. Today Columbia State Historic Park is home to the largest collection of gold rush era brick buildings, in California; whereas, structures of other mining camps of the California Gold Rush no longer exist.    

Columbia State Historic Park
7
 

The California Gold Rush: A Journey to the Goldfields

The famous discovery of gold in California, forever changed the landscape, economy and culture of California by the hundreds of thousands of people who migrated during California's gold rush. The famous discovery was made by James Marshall, at Sutter's Mill, on January 24th, 1848. Rumors and stories spread throughout the land of the discovery of gold, in California. The discovery was confirmed by President Polk,  11th President of the United States. President Polk made the announcement of the gold discovery, in California and the news spread world wide. Hundreds of thousands of people migrated to California from all around the world during the California Gold Rush of 1849. The journeys were long and dangerous. The three major routes are: around Cape Horn by ship (six to eight months), the Isthmus of Panama (two to three months), and the Overland trail (three to five months). By ship, dangers included: ship wrecks, lack of food and water, seasickness and disease. Ships that survived the long journeys arrived to the ports of San Francisco, where the migrants continued their journeys to the foothills of the Sierra Nevada.

Traveling 2,000 miles across an entire nation, on the Overland Trail by foot and wagons, exposed travelers other dangers, such as: misinformed trails, lack of food and water, and exposed them to inclimate weather while crossing deadly rivers, deserts, and high mountain passes. Only the very basic necessities were taken for these long journeys on the Overland trail; such as: food, water, wagons, stock, hunting tools, blacksmithing tools, clothing, blankets, sewing kits, medical supplies, etc.

On the Overland Trail, many miners joined companies. These companies were made up of people with various skills; such as, carpentry, medicine, navigation, hunting, blacksmithing and wheelwrights. The likelihood of surviving these long and dangerous journeys increased, significantly for those individuals who joined companies. If a company survived the journey to California on the Overland Trail, the company also had a higher likelihood of success in gold mining. Individuals within the company could stake multiple gold mining claims and the gold would then be divided among the people of the company. During the gold rush, individuals were only allowed to own one claim.  


Columbia State Historic Park
15
 

California Gold Rush Era Mining Technique Photos

Mining techniques evolved over time with development of larger mining companies. These photos also show cultural diversity during the California Gold Rush. 

Columbia State Historic Park
11
 

Historical Chinese Apothecary Exhibit of California Gold Rush Mining Town, at Columbia State Historic Park.

The population of California grew from 14,000 to 223,000 between the years of 1848 to 1852. During the California Gold Rush, people from different cultures migrated from all over the world, all sharing the same hopes of creating better lives for themselves and their families. The rich cultural diversity we find in California today can be traced back to many families from the earliest days of the State of California, through cultural artifacts. Columbia State Historic Park has the largest collection of gold rush brick buildings in California. This collection of 1850s gold rush era brick buildings is a living museum of cultural artifacts dated back to the diverse merchant economy that once thrived in Columbia, CA. During the gold rush, Columbia became one of the fifth largest cities in California, with one hundred and fifty businesses during the peak of Columbia's success. The Chinese population in Columbia owned a variety of different businesses; such as dry goods, boarding houses, laundry services, restaurants, and more. Originally, the Chinese population was located on the Western edge of town. In the late 1850s and 1860s, the Chinese began purchasing buildings from French merchants. The town's history of destructive fires and the rise and fall of the merchant economy shaped the reduction of the architectural landscape visitors find today, at Columbia State Historic Park. Many of the brick buildings survived it all and have been restored for visitors to enjoy today. Visitors of Columbia State Historic Park may view the Chinese Store exhibit through windows that display a large collection of Chinese artifacts. This collection of photos provides a closer look at the inside of the Chinese exhibit. Fong Yue Po, from the Yee Phong Herb Company, Sacramento, CA, donated many artifacts used in this exhibit.

Columbia State Historic Park
16
 

Discovering Korea Through an Object

This collection was created as an introduction to Korea and its culture by focusing on one object in the Freer/Sackler Museum.  "Water dropper in the form of a duck." Interdisciplinary lesson for Media (information literacy, research skills), Art (calligraphy), and Music (children’s songs).  

Susan Schmidt
6
 

Heroes

#PZPGH

Tonya O'Brien
8
 

Impressionists

#PZPGH

Tonya O'Brien
6
 

Behind Design: Inka Bridge

Introduction

How might we learn about cultures through the study of artifacts? What role could the study of design elements and process play in in deepening our understanding? How could we leverage student agency of the design process to gain opportunities to recognize relationships between artifacts and culture.

This collection provides opportunities for students to uncover complexity by looking closely and making connections between cultures and the design process behind the artifacts. Student claims are based on evidence using provided resources for investigation. The Artifact Investigation Map serves as a visible thinking tool for documenting our understanding of a culture by making connections between the artifact and our research.

Procedure

Begin by looking closely at an artifact, INCA BRIDGE, using a Project Zero Routine, Zoom In or See Think Wonder. Through close examination, we begin to develop hypotheses about the object and the connections to the culture. While a main goal is to learn more about the culture related to the artifact, we are also building a capacity for using this thinking process to build understanding. Record and display class ideas generated through this routine. In the discussion of culture, we are looking at how people live: What do the people value? What are their priorities and motivations?

Introduce the points of The Artifact Investigation Map. Ask students, “How could this be used to organize the ideas documented from the thinking routine about the artifact and the people who created it?”. (Students may recognize this as the Engineering Design Process.) Building on our initial Zoom In documentation, the group connects the artifact ideas to the map points. Different questions within each point may serve as prompts to continue making connections and lead to more questions about what we still wonder, guiding the next research steps. Provide a space to record and share new questions during the process.

Begin the research process with the first video Weaving the Bridge at Q'eswacha. Using information from the source, model the process of organizing the findings using the different points on The Artifact Investigation Map. Be sure to highlight unanswered questions in the map as the class decides the future steps in the research. Support the student use of resource-based evidence starting from this Learning Lab collection when making and documenting claims. Depending on the learners, this phase may vary in the structure of guidance and interaction. Documentation is shared with an emphasis on providing opportunities to discuss the claims, findings, and analysis.


Guiding Points for Inquiry using The Artifact Investigation Map:

Ask: What needs or problems might this artifact address/solve? Does this design reflect empathy for a particular group or person?

Imagine: What possible prototypes or variations might have been produced in the timeline of this artifact? Could there have been earlier versions leading to this one?  

Plan: Identify and describe what could have been key factors influencing design process. Examples: materials/natural resources, people power, skills, technology/tools, historical and natural environment….

(Re)Create: Describe the possible steps taken to create the artifact. What could this look like? Options include for this exploration: Try to create a mini-version or reenact one of the steps of the process. Use observations of the process to draw possible conclusions about the culture. Sketch or act out the steps. Take a part of the process and use the Step Inside thinking routine. *Document and share this process with the group in order to prepare for the next phase of The Artifact Investigation Map

Improvements: Since the creation of this artifact, what versions do we see today? What would the biography of this type of innovation look like? How might this type of artifact connect to modern innovation? *Extension for Improvements: Use the thinking routine Imagine If to evaluate a modern iteration of the artifact. How does it compare to the original?


Documenting Ongoing Conclusions/Questions/Reflections

Throughout the investigation, students share and post supported claims about the culture and reflect upon the process of using the design cycle to guide the study.

For the final reflection, use the thinking routine I Used to Think, Now I Think… to look for changes in thinking. Keep the process and research lines of thinking open for continued exploration with the unanswered questions.

#PZPGH

Erik Lindemann
32
 

Resources List: Asian Americans in Cleveland

This collection includes resources presented at the November 16, 2018 Educator Workshop at the Cleveland History Center of the Western Reserve Historical Society.

#APA2018   

Mary Manning
70
 

Colors of the World

This collections will help Early Learners with identifying colors in a new way!
Shakia Bonds
4
 

Behind Design: Exploring American Indian Cultures Through Artifact Investigation

Introduction

How might we learn about cultures through the study of artifacts? What role could the study of design elements and process play in in deepening our understanding? How could we leverage student agency of the design process to gain opportunities to recognize relationships between artifacts and culture.

This collection provides opportunities for students to uncover complexity by looking closely and making connections between cultures and the design process behind the artifacts. Student claims are based on evidence using provided resources for investigation. The Artifact Investigation Map serves as a visible thinking tool for documenting our understanding of a culture by making connections between the artifact and our research.

Procedure

Begin by looking closely at an artifact, Lone Dog Winter Count, using a Project Zero Routine, Zoom In. Through close examination, we begin to develop hypotheses about the object and the connections to the culture. While a main goal is to learn more about the culture related to the artifact, we are also building a capacity for using this thinking process to build understanding. Record and display class ideas generated through this routine. In the discussion of culture, we are looking at how people live: What do the people value? What are their priorities and motivations?

Introduce the points of The Artifact Investigation Map. Ask students, “How could this be used to organize the ideas documented from the thinking routine about the artifact and the people who created it?”. (Students may recognize this as the Engineering Design Process.) Building on our initial Zoom In documentation, the group connects the artifact ideas to the map points. Different questions within each point may serve as prompts to continue making connections and lead to more questions about what we still wonder, guiding the next research steps. Provide a space to record and share new questions during the process.

Begin the research process with the first video Lakota Winter Counts. Using information from the source, model the process of organizing the findings using the different points on The Artifact Investigation Map. Be sure to highlight unanswered questions in the map as the class decides the future steps in the research. Support the student use of resource-based evidence starting from this Learning Lab collection when making and documenting claims. Depending on the learners, this phase may vary in the structure of guidance and interaction. Documentation is shared with an emphasis on providing opportunities to discuss the claims, findings, and analysis.


Guiding Points for Inquiry using The Artifact Investigation Map:

Ask: What needs or problems might this artifact address/solve? Does this design reflect empathy for a particular group or person?

Imagine: What possible prototypes or variations might have been produced in the timeline of this artifact? Could there have been earlier versions leading to this one?  

Plan: Identify and describe what could have been key factors influencing design process. Examples: materials/natural resources, people power, skills, technology/tools, historical and natural environment….

(Re)Create: Describe the possible steps taken to create the artifact. What could this look like? Options include for this exploration: Try to create a mini-version or reenact one of the steps of the process. Use observations of the process to draw possible conclusions about the culture. Sketch or act out the steps. Take a part of the process and use the Step Inside thinking routine. *Document and share this process with the group in order to prepare for the next phase of The Artifact Investigation Map

Improvements: Since the creation of this artifact, what versions do we see today? What would the biography of this type of innovation look like? How might this type of artifact connect to modern innovation? *Extension for Improvements: Use the thinking routine Imagine If to evaluate a modern iteration of the artifact. How does it compare to the original?


Documenting Ongoing Conclusions/Questions/Reflections

Throughout the investigation, students share and post supported claims about the culture and reflect upon the process of using the design cycle to guide the study.

For the final reflection, use the thinking routine I Used to Think, Now I Think… to look for changes in thinking. Keep the process and research lines of thinking open for continued exploration with the unanswered questions.

#PZPGH

Andrea Croft
30
 

The Things I Carry

These three objects are filled with some of the best memories I can think of. All three of these were gifts to me by different family members. It shows that I like to be prepared for anything and that I highly value family and the things they give me. Each item could be replaced but wouldn't have the same sentimental value if they were. These three objects might not be in the best condition but all the rips and scratches they have each hold a different memory that can't be replaced. I can't go more than a few days without using or wearing these items because they are such a big part of my life.

Griffin Landers
3
 

Media, Color, & Identity: George Gershwin as a Lens to Uncover Individual Identity

Inquiry Description

Throughout history, people have represented themselves and others through media (e.g. paintings, film, photos, song, social media, etc.). Artists and individuals make conscious and unconscious choices about how to represent a person using media and color. These representations are open to individual interpretation.

In this inquiry, students  develop awareness of different perceptions and expressive qualities of color through an examination of historical sources. The first formative task entails a student exploration of the attributes of color through the "Interpreting & Communicating Color" task using paint color samples. Students then apply this understanding while analyzing portraiture and various other media through the lens of how artists represent a songwriter, George Gershwin. The second formative task involves students discussing and supporting claims about how Gershwin is represented in a text, The Music in George's Head: George Gershwin Creates Rhapsody in Blue, and in his music and a portrait. Students then write and support claims about how Gershwin is represented in various media forms in the third formative task. The lesson concludes with a summative task during which students determine the best colors and media to represent their own identity within the creation of a self-portrait.

The 2017 NCSS Notable Trade Book, The Music in George's Head: George Gershwin Creates Rhapsody in Blue, is intriguing because the illustrator chose to represent Gershwin in shades of blue. This text is ripe for color analysis. This Gershwin biography provides background knowledge about Gershwin's personality, thus acting as a resource that students may use to develop claims about artist's color choices as representations of Gershwin's identity. After acquiring knowledge of Gershwin's personality traits, students apply perceptions about the expressive qualities of color to various media (portraits, sculpture, photo, etc.). Many of these historical sources are from the National Portrait Gallery, a Smithsonian Institution museum, and represent treasured elements of our national history.

This inquiry will consist of four class periods [approximately].

 

Structure of the Inquiry

NCSS's Theme 4 Individual Development and Identity and the C3 Framework (i.e. D2.His.6.3-5.) expect that students investigate how individual perceptions effect how people are represented throughout history. Throughout the formative tasks, students gradually build skills needed to interpret and communicate about artists' color and media representations of people as well as individual perceptions about color usage within artistic works. Students interpret several portraits, namely, Wormley's 1936 George Gershwin; Auerbach's 1926 Gershwin at the Piano; and a 1934 Gershwin self-portrait. Additionally, students examine other forms of portraiture: Noguchi's 1929 Gershwin sculpture and a 1936 Gershwin photo. After examining these historical sources, students make a determination as to which historical source best represents George Gershwin and provides evidence as to why it is the best representation of Gershwin.

Students are expected to develop their personal identity as related to their time and place in society as stated in NCSS Theme 4 Individual Development and Identity. In the summative task, students apply these understandings to create a new historical source, a self-portrait, by making intentional choices about how to represent themselves through color within media.  

Inquiry Questions for the Lesson:

Compelling Question: What factors influence how individuals are perceived by others and themselves?

Supporting Question: What are the attributes of  color?

Supporting Question: How do media and color effect one's representation of identity?

Supporting Question: How are media and color used to represent George Gershwin's identity?

Supporting Question: What do media and color reveal about you?


These NCSS C3 Framework History Standards are the basis for the lesson content:

D2.His.10.3-5 Compare information provided by different historical sources about the past.

D2.His.13.3-5. Use information about a historical source, including the maker, date, place of origin, intended audience, and purpose to judge the extent to which the source is useful for studying a particular topic.

Angel Bestwick
22
 

Mochi Barrel - Japanese Cultural Traditions in Cleveland

This collection begins with one object from the collections of the Cleveland History Center - a usu, or stamp mill, that is used to make mochi, a type of Japanese rice cake.  Building from that one object, this collection also explores the history of the family who owned and used this item, the cultural traditions associated with the mochi-making ceremony that the family maintained years after their arrival in the United States, and how the Japanese-American population in Cleveland grew considerably during and after World War II.  

#APA2018

Mary Manning
18
 

Portraiture and the Rhetorical Triangle

Subject: AP Language, Rhetorical Analysis

This collection features portraits (some that can be used for comparing and contrasting) for studying and practicing usage of the rhetorical triangle.  Students may also SOAPSTone the images.  

Objectives:

  • Students will observe different portraits.
  • Students will analyze different portraits using the rhetorical triangle.  
  • Students will recall lessons from history to apply background knowledge to the analysis.  

This collection was created in conjunction with the National Portrait Gallery's 2018 Learning to Look Summer Teacher Institute.  

#NPGTeach



Mai Khanh Nguyen
13
 

Educating for Global Competence with Contemporary Asian Art

What is global competence?  What are the skills and dispositions of globally competent students?  What role can art play in educating students for global competence?  Teachers can use this Learning Lab Collection as a resource for students to explore themes of global importance in the arts of Asia.  The Collection features two works of contemporary Asian art at the Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery with several tools for students to examine and reflect about the works of art, such as Visible Thinking Routines,  Artful Thinking Routines, or Global Thinking Routines.  For each routine, the rationale and  process is described to help the teacher practice.  The Collection also includes artist interviews and other contextual information about the works of art for teachers and students to deepen their understanding.

This Learning Lab Collection was created to support the The Council of Chief State School Officers (CCSSO) National Teachers of the Year 2018 program.  CCSSO is a nonpartisan, nationwide, nonprofit organization of public officials who head departments of elementary and secondary education in the states, the District of Columbia, the Department of Defense Education Activity, the Bureau of Indian Education and the five U.S. extra-state jurisdictions.  Learn more at https://www.ccsso.org/

Essential Questions to be addressed by this Learning Lab Collection:

  • What are some practical tools teachers can use to look closely and reflect about works of art?
  • How can we use works of art to prepare students to understand the world and participate in it?
  • How do we define global competence and globally competent students?

#NTOY18

Tags:  #AsiaTeachers; Asian; Asia; Freer|Sackler; Project Zero; Global Competence; Global Competency; Visible Thinking; Artful Thinking; Chalk Talk; See-Think-Wonder; 3Ys; 3-2-1 Bridge; Contemporary Asian Art; China; India; Monkeys; Religion; Architecture; Chinese Cultural Revolution; Xu Bing; Terminal; Subodh Gupta; Sculpture; Lacquer; Wood; Brass 

Freer|Sackler Education
22
 

Math: Unstacked

UNSTACKED is a wonderful way to spark inquiry, analysis, and discussion. By visually exploring our images, you can bring the Smithsonian Libraries' collections into your classroom. Use UNSTACKED as a morning exercise, a way to introduce a new topic, or to discover your students' interests. Picture your world, dive into the stacks! 

The research and creation of this project was funded by the Gates Foundation Youth Access Grant.

Smithsonian Libraries
10
 

Learning to Look: Letter from Artist Yasuo Kuniyoshi, after the Japanese Attack on Pearl Harbor

This collection includes student activities and learning to look questions, as well as additional teacher resources for extending the lesson. Students will use the primary sources to understand the changing perspectives and perceptions of Japanese Americans in the World War II era.

Keywords: Japanese Incarceration, George Biddle, Franklin D. Roosevelt, WW2, WWII, analysis, written response, essay, text, Max Yavno, Pearl Harbor, Works Progress Administration (WPA)

#APA2018

#historicalthinking


Ashley Naranjo
12
 

Weikers Family Collection

A collection of archival records and photographs documenting the Weikers family's experience in Nazi Germany and their persistent efforts to seek asylum in the United States.


For more information about the Weiker family story, see their profile on Generation to Generation: Family Stories Drawn from the Rauh Jewish Archives at http://www.jewishfamilieshistory.org/

Tags: Nazi Germany, Holocaust era, primary sources

#historicalthinking


Aubrey Gennari
9
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