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Found 877 Collections

 

Ancient Egyptian Religion & Social Hierarchy: Pyramids

This student activity examines the importance of religion and social hierarchy in Ancient Egypt through the construction of pyramids. Details evolution over time and encourages cross-cultural comparison. Includes photographs, an artifact, a video, a reading-level appropriate article, and opportunities to learn more at the Met Museum website and Google Street View.

Big Questions: 

  • How did the pyramids evolve over time? 
  • How does this evolution reflect the importance of religion and social hierarchy in Ancient Egyptian urban society?

Keywords: archaeology

Tess Porter
12
 

Ancient Egyptian Stelae: See Think Wonder

Using the Project Zero Visible Thinking routine "See Think Wonder," this activity explores multiple stelae, or funerary markers, from Ancient Egypt. Through analysis of these stelae, students will gain an understanding of: the different functions of stelae, their common characteristics, and how they fit into the larger picture of Ancient Egyptian funerary practice and afterlife beliefs.

Keywords: stela, stele, steles, stelai, memorial, commemorative, inquiry strategy, archaeology

#historicalthinking

Tess Porter
5
 

Ancient Greek Myth: Reinterpreted by African American Artists

In this student activity, analyze the timelessness of myth through three works of art by modern African American artists. Each artist, inspired by Ancient Greek myth, retells stories and reinterprets symbols to explore personal and universal themes. Includes three works of art, summaries of the myths they reference, and discussion questions. Also includes a video about the artist Romare Bearden and his series 'Black Odyssey,' that details Bearden's artistic process, the significance of storytelling in his art, and the lasting importance of 'Black Odyssey.'

Tags: greece

Tess Porter
6
 

Ancient Greek Vases

Resources and directions for middle school Greek vase art project.


Directions:

  1. On a piece of orange construction paper draw an outline of a Greek vase, (or vessel, pot, jar)
  2. Cut out your vase.
  3. Choose a story or image from ancient Greece. Examples include greek myths, Olympics, and battle stories.
  4. In the center of the vase use a black sharpie marker to illustrate your story.
  5. On the neck and base of your vase use at least 5  of the patterns to decorate. (2+ on neck,3+ on base)
  6. Finally, glue your orange vase onto a piece of black construction paper
  7. Save the extra orange paper that you cut away for decorating the edges like a mosaic alternating with white.


Tracey Barhorst
19
 

Angel Island Immigration Station - An Immigrant's Gift (Angel Island State Park)

The Angel Island Immigration Station operated as one of the immigrant induction processing centers for the Western United States from 1910 to 1940. The following activities will help learners explore the experiences of the various immigrants that were detained at Angel Island and the process they endured in their attempt to gain access to America.

Upon completing the lesson, students will be able to:

  • Use rhetorical thinking to analyze a poem.
  • Analyze the perspective shared in a poem, a primary source document.
  • Engage in a "Text Talk," by coming to a discussion prepared after annotating a poem.
ranger_casey
15
 

Angel Island Immigration Station - Two Brides, Two Pathways (Angel Island State Park)

The Angel Island Immigration Station operated as one of the immigrant induction processing centers for the Western United States from 1910 to 1940. The following activities will help learners explore the experiences of the various immigrants that were detained at Angel Island and the process they endured in their attempt to gain access to America.

Upon completing the lesson students will be able to:

  • Interact with photos, maps, and poems from the United States Immigration Station
  • Ask questions and develop the skill of inquiry
  • Introduce the concept of immigration
ranger_casey
26
 

Animal Sculptures

Images support second grade paper sculpture lesson. View a few images and lead a discussion with questioning:

  • What do you notice about this picture?
  • Where do you think this is located?
  • If you were here and saw this animal, what would you be thinking?
  • Why do you think the artist chose to put this animal in this spot?
  • How do you think the animal affects people who use this space?
  • Can you think of a space in your community where an artist might place an animal sculpture?
Jean-Marie Galing
7
 

Anna May Wong x Sally Wen Mao

How can you be a changemaker in society? 

This topical collection honors the life of film icon Anna May Wong by pairing images from the Smithsonian National Portrait Gallery collections with poetry by celebrated contemporary poet Sally Wen Mao. Wong's film and television career spanned from 1919 to 1960, and included numerous star turns, transnational celebrity, and an array of firsts for an Asian American actress. It was also a career forged in the shadow of--and in defiance of--widespread xenophobia, leaving a legacy that takes on a new cast and consequence today, in an era of COVID-19 and virulent anti-Asian racism. 

After viewing this topical collection, visit https://smithsonianapa.org/anna-may-wong/ to:

  • download a set of postcards that include portraits of Anna May Wong and Sally Wen Mao's poetry
  • watch a short video by Sally Wen Mao about her "patron saint," and
  • instructions for making your own postcards.
Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center
29
 

APUSH WWI Propaganda

This student activity includes a variety of types of propaganda related to World War I. The United States government took great action when it came to World War I—they helped organize workers, recruit military members, and regulate the economy so that American could have a successful impact on the war. The Committee of Public Information formed by George Creel and other propaganda-producers used advertising techniques from businesses to make appeals to the average citizen and encourage them to make a difference. This assignment will ask you to connect each piece of propaganda to one of four major goals of the U.S. government during the war and to analyze a few specific pieces for author, audience, purpose, and even the medium/form.

Essential questions include:

  • What are the four main goals of the government during World War I?
  • Why and how did propaganda creators target specific audiences with their messages?
  • What are the effects of changing the medium or form of propaganda on how it might be received?

Tags: World War I, WWI, selective service, draft, liberty bonds, propaganda, music, Uncle Sam, persuasive writing, cause effect

Molly Chester
14
 

Are student rights protected in school?

This collection explores a number of Supreme Court cases all looking at the rights students have in the American public school system. Students will encounter these court cases through primary and secondary sources, videos, photographs, podcasts, and historical objects. At the end of the lesson, students should be able construct an argument based off the compelling question "Are student rights protected in school?"

Leah Knecht
16
 

Are student rights protected in school?

This collection explores a number of Supreme Court cases all looking at the rights students have in the American public school system. Students will encounter these court cases through primary and secondary sources, videos, photographs, podcasts, and historical objects. At the end of the lesson, students should be able construct an argument based off the compelling question "Are student rights protected in school?"

Brenda Sandbulte
16
 

Area Architects--Quay Dorsey

This is an overview of an area and coding project 3rd grade students completed this year. 

Quay Dorsey
7
 

Area Artists: Washington, D.C.

This Learning Lab from the National Museum of African American History and Culture (NMAAHC) will explore three different visual artists with ties to Washington, D.C.

As a black women artists, Alma Thomas, Elizabeth Catlett, and Loïs Mailou Jones encountered many barriers to success. All three artists lived and worked in Washington, D.C. throughout their careers. They contributed to the social, artistic, and academic communities within the nation's capital and beyond. 

Visitors to this Learning Lab collection will have the opportunity  to learn more about Alma Thomas, Elizabeth Catlett, and Loïs Mailou Jones, and their approaches to art and art making. The questions, prompts, and information provided in this Learning Lab will help students develop their knowledge of Washington D.C. history and foster an appreciation for great artists. 

The guiding questions of this Learning Lab are

  • Who are Alma Thomas, Elizabeth Catlett, and Loïs Mailou Jones?
  • How were these artists' personal lives and artistic practices shaped by their time in Washington, D.C.?
  • What inspired each artist to create their works?
  • How are the artists' works similar? How are they different?

If you are new to Learning Lab, visit https://learninglab.si.edu/help/getting-started to learn how to get started!

National Museum of African American History and Culture
13
 

Arguments to meditate: an introduction through American Art

This collection is for use with an introductory lesson for a 12th-grade rhetoric course's unit on "arguments to meditate," which are defined in the text "Everything's an Argument" by Andrea Lunsford and John Ruszkiewicz as, to paraphrase, those arguments which are abstract and/or which lack a clear, explicitly stated thesis and that therefore depend on thoughtful meditation by the audience to arrive at an understanding of the rhetorician's intent. The purpose of this lesson is to (1) establish students' understanding of the definition of an argument to meditate and (2) provide students with a beginning ability to assess the thesis and supporting ideas that comprise arguments to meditate in the form of American Art. The details of the lesson itself are included in a document within the collection.

#SAAMteach

Marshall Harris
10
 

Arizona State Museum Donald Cordry Photographs of Mexican Indian Costumes

The Donald B. Cordry collection contains photographs of Mexican mask-makers and textile weavers. Many of these photographs appear in his two books Mexican Masks and Mexican Indian Costumes.

#LatinoHAC

Arizona State Museum
55
 

Art and Technology Projects for Museums and Classrooms: From "Today I Am Here" to "Discovering US/Descubriéndonos"

This collection contains assets and resources designed to help teachers (art, English, ESOL, social studies, and media technology), museum educators, and community-based informal learning educators recreate their own "Today I Am Here" project, based on the specific needs of their classroom or learning community. 

"Today I Am Here" is a project in which students make a handmade book from one piece of paper, that tells the story of how they got to where they are today. This project is wonderful in a classroom to show the breadth and diversity of the class, and to encourage cross-cultural understanding. 

Inside you will find instructions and images for the various components of the project, as well as samples of student work. 

#LatinoHAC

Philippa Rappoport
14
 

Art reflecting Life

Art, posters and artifacts that reflect events and viewpoints changing over time. Make sure you refer back to the questions on canvas!

magough
7
 

Artifact Analysis

In this collection we explore the definition of an artifact and analyze various artifacts from multiple cultural periods.

Idaho State Museum
18
 

Artist Trading Cards: Database

In this collection, students will explore  artists from modern and contemporary eras. Students will choose one artist to learn more about using the links provided. Students will research the history in connection with the chosen artist and describe their work. Students will then create 4 trading cards about their chosen artists, with images in the style of the artist. 

Collection includes artwork by the following artists: El Anatsui, Andy Warhol, Dorothea Lange, Monet, Helen Frankenthaler, Mark Rothko, Nick Cave, Yinka Shonibare, Wayne Thiebaud, Mary Cassat, Kandinsky, Paul Klee, Mies van der Rohe, Kehinde Willey, Amy Sherald, Ansel Adams, Ran Hwang, Julie Mehretu, Sarah Sze, Rusell Crotty, Jasper Johns, Romare Bearden, Frank Lloyd Wright, Mondrian, Seurat,  Calder, Donald Judd,  Sol Lewitt, and Roy Lichtenstien.

This collection was created for the "Smithsonian Learning Lab, Focus on Global Arts and Humanities" session at the 2019 New Jersey Principals and Supervisors Association (NJPSA) Arts Integration Leadership Institute. 

Keywords: art history, trading cards, modern, contemporary,

Rebecca Beaird
135
 

Asian American Art: "Emerging from the Shadows"

This collection is meant to build on "Socially Constructed Learning through Art" and to introduce the viewer to artists of Asian ancestry in America using Chang, Johnson & Karlstrom's text, Asian American Art: A History, 1850-1970 (2008), the vast resources of the Smithsonian Learning Lab, Project Zero's Global Thinking Routines and other resources.  This collection is part one of four that I have organized, chronologically, on Asian American Art.  The other three collections are "Asian American Artists and World War II",  "Asian American Modernism" and "Asian American Contemporary Art".  It is my hope that these collections will serve as entry points to understanding the many contributions of Asian American artists in the U.S. from 1850 until the present time.

Visual art is a language that is socially and culturally constructed.  Socially constructed learning values diverse perspectives, engages with local and global experts, and employs inquiry, discovery and exploration to move students toward global citizenship.  Because the visual arts leverage the power of dialogue and debate to sharpen critical thinking, starting with the arts is a logical place to help students develop cultural intelligence.

Other purposes of these collections are to explore tangible and intangible cultural heritage; as well as jumpstart brave conversations about race, identity and immigration in the U.S. with teachers, tutors of English Language Learners and others who are interested in becoming cultural leaders in our public schools.

In Asian American Art: A History, 1850-1970 (Chang, Johnson, Karlstrom, 2008), Gordon H. Chang writes about Asian American art "emerging from the shadows".  He asks, "Why has this treasure been outside our vision?"  Historically, those of Asian heritage faced discrimination in the United States.  For instance, the Chinese Exclusion Act of 1882 prevented Asian immigrants from entering the country.  In 1945, the U.S. government forced Japanese Americans to move to remote internment camps.  Most of these people of Japanese ancestry were U.S. citizens or legal residents and they were forced to abandon their homes and businesses until the war ended.  In 1965, the U.S. finally lifted the last of the immigration laws that overtly discriminated against Asians.  

Asian Americans are now the fastest-growing racial group in the U.S., outpacing both Latinos and African Americans.  In 2013, there were more than 17.3 million Asian Americans living in the U.S. -- 6% of the population.  

So although Asian Americans have been making and exhibiting art in the U.S. since 1850, why is it still so difficult to define the style or content of Asian American art?  We will come back to this question in each of the four collections.

For early Asian American art, as Chang states in his forward, "The fascination with modern abstraction and nonrepresentational art, especially after World War II, turned public eyes away from art that appeared to have social messages or overt ethnic connections.  Art produced by Asian Americans, other racial minorities, and women in America that displayed such markers now appeared nonmodern and was eclipsed by the interest in abstraction.  Art that reflected the quandary of exile (such as that suffered by Chinese diasporic artists -- Wang Ya-chen, Chang Shu-chi, and Chang Dai-chien, for example -- in the mid twentieth century), displacement (such as that experienced by artists who worked in the United States during the height of racial antagonism, such as Yun Gee or Chiura Obata), and persecution (the Japanese artists who suffered internment, Eitaro Ishigaki and others, hounded because of their political beliefs) fell out of fashion." 

#APA2018

Julie Sawyer
24
 

Asian American Modernism

This collection is meant to build on two earlier collections, "Asian American Art: Emerging from the Shadows"  and "Asian American Artists and World War II" and to introduce the viewer to artists of Asian ancestry in America using Chang, Johnson & Karlstrom's text, Asian American Art: A History, 1850-1970 (2008), the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco's exhibition catalog "Asian/American/Modern Art: Shifting Currents, 1900-1970" (2008),the vast resources of the Smithsonian Learning Lab, Project Zero's Global Thinking Routines and other resources.  This collection is part two of four that I have organized, chronologically, on Asian American Art.  The other three collections are "Asian American Art: Emerging from the Shadows",  "Asian American Artists and World War II" and "Asian American Contemporary Art".  It is my hope that these collections will serve as entry points to understanding the many contributions of Asian American artists in the U.S. from 1850 until the present time.

Visual art is a language that is socially and culturally constructed.  Socially constructed learning values diverse perspectives, engages with local and global experts, and employs inquiry, discovery and exploration to move students toward global citizenship.  Because the visual arts leverage the power of dialogue and debate to sharpen critical thinking, starting with the arts is a logical place to help students develop cultural intelligence.

Other purposes of these collections are to explore tangible and intangible cultural heritage; as well as jumpstart brave conversations about race, identity and immigration in the U.S. with teachers, tutors of English Language Learners and others who are interested in becoming cultural leaders in our public schools.

As Gordon H. Chang and Mark Dean Johnson state in the introduction of the exhibition catalog, "Asian/American/Modern Art: Shifting Currents, 1900-1970" (2008):

"Forty years ago there were no Asian Americans.  There were Chinese, Japanese, Koreans, Filipinos, and others of Asian ancestry in the United States, but no 'Asian Americans,' as that term was coined only in 1968.  This population was commonly seen as foreign, alien, not of America.  Their lives and experiences were not generally accepted as part of the fabric of the country, even though Asians had begun settling here steadily in the mid-nineteenth century.

Then, in the late 1960s, as part of the upsurge in the self-assertion of marginalized communities,  'Asian America' emerged to challenge the stigma of perpetual foreignness.  'Asian American' was a claim of belonging, of rootedness, of pride and identity, and of history and community; it was also a recognition of distinctive cultural achievement"  (Chang, Johnson, 2008).

#APA2018

Julie Sawyer
18
 

Asian American Modernism

This collection is meant to build on two earlier collections, "Asian American Art: Emerging from the Shadows"  and "Asian American Artists and World War II" and to introduce the viewer to artists of Asian ancestry in America using Chang, Johnson & Karlstrom's text, Asian American Art: A History, 1850-1970 (2008), the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco's exhibition catalog "Asian/American/Modern Art: Shifting Currents, 1900-1970" (2008),the vast resources of the Smithsonian Learning Lab, Project Zero's Global Thinking Routines and other resources.  This collection is part two of four that I have organized, chronologically, on Asian American Art.  The other three collections are "Asian American Art: Emerging from the Shadows",  "Asian American Artists and World War II" and "Asian American Contemporary Art".  It is my hope that these collections will serve as entry points to understanding the many contributions of Asian American artists in the U.S. from 1850 until the present time.

Visual art is a language that is socially and culturally constructed.  Socially constructed learning values diverse perspectives, engages with local and global experts, and employs inquiry, discovery and exploration to move students toward global citizenship.  Because the visual arts leverage the power of dialogue and debate to sharpen critical thinking, starting with the arts is a logical place to help students develop cultural intelligence.

Other purposes of these collections are to explore tangible and intangible cultural heritage; as well as jumpstart brave conversations about race, identity and immigration in the U.S. with teachers, tutors of English Language Learners and others who are interested in becoming cultural leaders in our public schools.

As Gordon H. Chang and Mark Dean Johnson state in the introduction of the exhibition catalog, "Asian/American/Modern Art: Shifting Currents, 1900-1970" (2008):

"Forty years ago there were no Asian Americans.  There were Chinese, Japanese, Koreans, Filipinos, and others of Asian ancestry in the United States, but no 'Asian Americans,' as that term was coined only in 1968.  This population was commonly seen as foreign, alien, not of America.  Their lives and experiences were not generally accepted as part of the fabric of the country, even though Asians had begun settling here steadily in the mid-nineteenth century.

Then, in the late 1960s, as part of the upsurge in the self-assertion of marginalized communities,  'Asian America' emerged to challenge the stigma of perpetual foreignness.  'Asian American' was a claim of belonging, of rootedness, of pride and identity, and of history and community; it was also a recognition of distinctive cultural achievement"  (Chang, Johnson, 2008).

#APA2018

Rubina Pantoja
18
 

Asian Art at Home: Explore Japanese Art

Let the wonder and the beauty of the museum come to you!  Explore Japanese art with educators from the Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery with these three lessons.  Each lesson features guided looking at Japanese art and an art-making component.  Each lesson can stand alone; complete one, two, or all three lessons as time allows.  The content needed for each lesson is divided by an arrow; look to the right of each arrow to view the information you need for each lesson.  The lessons are designed for students in 1st through 5th grades.

Did you give one of these lessons a try?  Tag us using #FreerSackler or @FreerSackler on FacebookInstagram, or Twitter.  Email us at AsiaTeachers@si.edu and we will post your work in the Art Gallery section of this page.

Lesson One: Japan and DC Landscapes

  • Explore the landscapes of Japan! Young learners will see, think, and wonder about Japanese landscape paintings as they think about their favorite landscapes of DC.  After seeing and wondering about the landscapes of Japan, learners will sketch their favorite DC landscape. This lesson will take 30-60 minutes to complete depending on skill level and supplies available at home.  For grades 1st through 4th.  Especially designed for the DCPS 3rd grade spring ELA unit on DC landmarks:  Students learn about various monuments, historical and cultural landmarks, and neighborhoods in Washington, D.C. They deepen their understanding of D.C.’s famous cultural and historical landmarks. 

Lesson Two:  Exploring Japanese Landscapes

  • Young learners will zoom in and explore two works of art by the Japanese artist Katsushika Hokusai (1760-1839).  Learners will be invited to make two sketches:  a symbol to represent themselves and a sketch of their favorite month or season.  This lesson will take 20-60 minutes to complete depending on skill level and supplies available at home.  For grades 1st through 3rd.  Especially designed for the DCPS 1st grade spring ELA unit on symbols:  Students learn about common American symbols [...]. Things and figures can be symbolic and have meaning to people. They make connections to the texts [works of art] by thinking about their values and what symbols best represent them.

Lesson Three:  Make a Mini Japanese Folding Screen

  • Daydream and get crafty!  Learners will create a landscape of their dreams.  After a guided meditation, learners will use collage to create a miniature Japanese folding screen using a cereal box or other items found around the home.  The lesson includes modifications if supplies are limited.  Time needed:  40 minutes - 2 hours, depending on supplies on hand and skill level.  For 1st grade through 5th grade.

Freer and Sackler Galleries
21
 

Asian Pacific Cuisine

Food, agriculture, tools, and customs in Asian Pacific Cuisine.  International Foods Lab 2018, #tcslowell, #APA2018

Lorraine Ostanik-Bellessa
24
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