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Found 968 Collections

 

I'm taking my ball and going HOME!

This collection will serve as the basis for a series of activities designed to promote global competence and to teach for understanding . Specifically, these activities focus on building competence in the domains of investigating the world and taking action. All of these experiences and tasks will use the concept of "HOME" as their point of nucleation or seed, and as a through-line to connect the students to the material and help them extend the material beyond the classroom. 

Resources in this learning lab include:

  1. A collection of global thinking routines to be applied during these encounters, as well as the rationales and goals for their use. 
  2. An example of thinking routines designed to foster global competence based on Homer's Odyssey (I use the Fagles translation) and the work of contemporary Korean-born artist, Do Ho Suh. 
  3. Suggestions for expansion, further interrogation, and fractal extension, including extension into further abstraction.
  4. A series of journal entries charting some of the thinking leading to the production of this learning lab. 
  5. A padlet including documentation of my thinking process and some photos of other pieces by Do Ho Suh: https://padlet.com/debic_mathieu/67572xigbcn 


Timeline:

  • This learning lab collection was originally conceived to be used in an English/Language Arts or composition class. As such, it favors written expression. These writing assignments could be altered, shortened, or dispensed with altogether. 
  • The timeline I had in mind when building this learning lab was about two or three weeks of class time. Obviously it could go longer or shorter, depending on the circumstances of teachers using it. 

#SAAMteach

Mathieu Debic
9
 

who am I

Search for your personal meaning in life. Who are you as an individual person? How do you connect as  a member of your community? your country? the world?

louise brady
11
 

Can art be used for social or political commentary?

What are contemporary issues in our world? What is your personal viewpoint on a contemporary issue? Can art be used as an agent of change?

louise brady
28
 

Meaningful objects

Can objects have meaning? What is symbolically meaningful in your life?  Through photography and text, use aesthetic choices to make your meaning visually strong. 

The first image is from the Smithsonian collection. The other images are from students at Horace Greeley High School in Chappaqua, NY.

louise brady
9
 

Putting the A in STEAM. How can prototyping push your thinking?

Putting the "A" in STEAM.                                                                               Can you imagine what doesn't exist but could? Can you visually communicate your vision to others? How can prototyping be used as a tool for exploration, invention and communication. 

louise brady
22
 

chairs- form and function

Chair design is an excellent example of form and function working together. Some designs favor ergonomics, some favor aesthetics. The best marry the two. Students were challenged to create a chair for a client.

louise brady
45
 

Shapes

Exploring shapes with preschoolers

Alix Fitzpatrick
18
 

Artifacts tell stories of the Encounter and Frontier

A collection of artifacts from which our students will choose an object of study for their first project cycle. Student swill be using historical, scientific, literary, mathematical and artistic techniques to help their chosen artifact tell a story of an encounter in history between two groups and/or cultures.

Andrew Meyers
47
 

Traqueros, part 3: The Art of Martín Ramírez (1895–1963)

Martín Ramírez (1895–1963) was born in Jalisco, Mexico. He emigrated to the U.S. in 1925 to work in California as a miner and a traquero. Poverty and his need to seek steady work forced him to leave his wife Ana and their four children in Mexico. The Great Depression left him unemployed, and acute mental illness led him to be remanded to the DeWitt State Hospital in Auburn, California in 1948, where he lived until his death in 1963.

As told by the curators at the Smithsonian American Art Museum: "Around 1948, Ramírez began to draw on an eclectic array of paper surfaces—brown wrapping paper, laundry lists, paper cups, old letters—which were glued together to form a unified drawing area. He made use of a variety of tools and techniques, including crayons, colored pencils, watercolors, chalk, ink, and collage.

"Ramírez's motifs reflect his life in two distinct cultures. His highly patterned, intricate drawings present fantastic renditions of subjects such as Mexican soldiers, Madonnas, prairie dogs, cars, and trains. In terms of technique, what is most extraordinary in Ramírez's art is his use of line to create the many different kinds of space—niches, frames, stages—in which his protagonists are placed. Although flatness characterizes the overall effect of his technique, the numerous parallel lines in Ramírez's work bring about a sense of visual depth."

About 450 of Martin Ramirez's drawings and collages are known to exist. He is widely regarded as one of the 20th century's greatest autodidactic artists. His work has been presented in solo exhibitions at museums around the world, including the Centro cultural/Arte contemporáneo in Mexico City (1989), the American Folk Art Museum in New York City (2007, 2009), and the Museo nacional centro de arte Reína Sofía in Madrid (2010).

#EthnicStudies #MexicanAmericans #Traqueros #Railroads #SelfTaught #Latinos #Chicanos #Artists #MartinRamirez

David Colon
5
 

1920s and 1930s Artifacts

Exploring significant events, people, and movements of the 1920s and 1930s through artifacts from that time period.

E. Garmon
10
 

Luis Cruz Azaceta's "Shifting States: Iraq"

This teaching collection helps students to think critically and globally by using two Thinking Routines to explore the painting, "Shifting States: Iraq," by Cuban American artist Luis Cruz Azaceta. The work is a metaphorical representation of the unrest taking place in Iraq, and more broadly, an exploration of the human condition during times of crisis.

Included here are the work itself from the Smithsonian American Art Museum, a video with curator E. Carmen Ramos, another video from Articulateshow.org, two suggested Thinking Routines - "Colors, Shapes, Lines" and "The 3 Y's" - from Harvard's Project Zero Artful Thinking and Global Thinking materials, and three other works by Azaceta in the Smithsonian collections.

For use in Social Studies, Spanish, English, American History, Art History classes

#LatinoHAC

Philippa Rappoport
11
 

Dismissing the Dead White Guy

This collection explores the necessity, logic, and fairness of the inclusion and/or exclusion of people of history based on gender and/or race. 

Lessons include

Looking Using the Puzzle Strategy

Looking using several various strategies. 

Easily customization by simply using as an individual or group lesson or by requiring all, some, or one of the additional group portraits.

Researching People and Inventions

Recognizing Bias and Objective Analysis

Understanding the Difference Between Bias and Prejudice

Argumentative Essay Writing (Designed as a timed writing for AP Lang, but the prompt could easily be turned into a formal writing assignment. 


#NPGteach

Deborah Eades
15
 

Designing Alternative Energy Solutions

Climate change is a huge issue facing our society. Our students have expressed tremendous concerns about the global impact of the climate crisis.

As part of this learning lab, student teams are tasked with designing and prototyping an alternative energy solution for NYC.

Before embarking on their own designs, students will use the resources to learn about earlier climate campaigns, what scientists and engineers are doing today and will explore models, prototypes and solutions that are already existent.

sara gottlieb
28
 

Miró

Look carefully at these artworks by Joan Miró. What do you notice? How are objects represented?

Eveleen Eaton
4
 

Jacob Lawrence

Look closely at this collection of artwork. What do you notice about Jacob Lawrence's style? How does he represent people and objects? 

Eveleen Eaton
4
 

Going the Distance

Discovery Theater is a pan-institutional museum theater dedicated to bringing theatre to young audiences and general visitors on and off the Mall since 1969.Race to the finish line with two black Olympians who changed history! Soaring music and the exhilaration of world-class sorts inspire us all to greatness in this vivid portrayal of the lives of Jesse Owens and Wilma Rudolph. Watch them overcome childhood illness, infirmity, and poverty to become the world’s fastest man and fastest woman, winning the greatest honor in athletics: the Olympic Gold medal. The John Cornelius II score speaks to the heart and soul of the winner in all of us.

Discovery Theater
48
 

Taiko Drums

Discovery Theater is a pan-institutional museum theater dedicated to bringing theatre to young audiences and general visitors on and off the Mall since 1969.  The world’s most dangerous half-Japanese/half-Scottish solo improvisational taiko drum artist combines this traditional form of powerful playing on huge “Taiko” (drum) with a modern vibe, creating  participatory performances that rock the house and educate all the senses. Taiko players are their own instruments—the body dances as the music pours forth with massive sound and energy.  Experience Mark and his music in a dynamic show that celebrates this fierce Japanese artform.  

Discovery Theater
36
 

Science Tellers: Escape from Earth

Discovery Theater is a pan-institutional museum theater dedicated to bringing theatre to young audiences and general visitors on and off the Mall since 1969. Throughout this amazing intergalactic story, we use science experiments to bring the story to life! In the second part of the show, we go “behind the scenes” of the special effects and recreate the science experiments with the help of volunteers from the audience. Don’t miss this action-packed and educational alien adventure. It's totally out of this world!

Discovery Theater
42
 

Science of Spring

Discovery Theater is a pan-institutional museum theater dedicated to bringing theatre to young audiences and general visitors on and off the Mall since 1969.  The magic of earth science takes center stage in this fun, interactive Discovery Theater original as we explore the indigenous and modern science behind the greening of the year.  Using science, culture and history, we examine humanity’s relationship to the natural ‘new year’ – a time when the earth and its creatures experience the rebirth, regeneration and new growth. Seed germination pairs with the story of Persephone returning from underground; the science and mystery of a simple egg link with new birth and lambs, birds and bunnies tales; the earth science of warming spring weather create a great atmosphere for learning and fun.  

Discovery Theater
48
 

Uprooted Dreams

Uprooted Dreams (Alebrijes)

On permanent display in the Education Area upstairs at the ESB-MACC is Uprooted Dreams (2012), a site-specific sculptural installation that features over 19 individual, brightly colored woodcarvings, mounted in the public entrance of the Education Area. Artist Margarita Cabrera was selected to create an artwork which would engage the community in its production. "Uprooted Dreams is a work of art designed in the form of workshop production...nineteen members of Austin's immigrant community- guided by Master Artesanos, Ranulfo Sergio Ibañes and Lucia Luria Sosa, experts in the Mexican craft tradition of alebrije-created, carved and painted wooden sculptures. These pieces embodied artistic themes of uprootedness as they spoke to the transformation of people, land, and community. For the artist, artesanos, participants, and audience, the process and product of Uprooted Dreams provides an ongoing platform on which to build respect, equality, solidarity, and dignified ways of making art and creating community.   - Margarita Cabrera

#ethnicstudies 

Emma S. Barrientos Mexican American Cultural Center
25
 

Digital tools for Social Impact

This collections includes examples of digital and interactive design presenting innovation in technology-based media and involving mobile applications, data visualization, mapping, augmented/virtual reality and robotics, to examine social justice issues and/or provide a social service. 

Projects & case studies demonstrate how the strategy and craft of design, as well as digital storytelling, are aimed to effect change in communities throughout the world.




Chantal Fischzang

Assistant Professor
Department of Arts, Culture & Media
Rutgers University-Newark

Co-Director
Design Consortium
Visual Means




#socialImpactdesign #designforgood #digitaldesign #digitalstorytelling #digitaltools #servicedesign #interactivedesign #datavisualization #socialjustice


Chantal Fischzang
22
 

Visualizing Guns Violence

At Rutgers University-Newark and within the Graphic Design Program, we offer two courses that focus on community-based (the Design Consortium) and research-oriented (Visual Means) activities. These classes are part of a larger initiative, and art incubator called Express Newark, where community and the university interact, collaborate and co-create.

In addition to the DC and VM courses, we offer an advanced design studio course that focuses on unique design applications through the use of the letterpress printing process, also located at Express Newark. This coming spring, I will be teaching the letterpress course, and in the following fall, I will teach the Visual Means course. Within both classes, I will be looking to develop different ways of visualizing gun violence.

Gun violence is one of the most critical and complex issues we currently face in the United States. Rutgers University has recently created the New Jersey’s Center on Gun Violence. The center’s mission looks to “conduct interdisciplinary research on the causes, consequences, and solutions to gun-related violence while respecting the rights of legal, safe gun ownership and use.” Within the Visual Means course, I plan to work with researchers from this center on developing ways of visualizing the complicated and overwhelming data disconnect between research and public understanding of gun rights, safety, and violence.

What I plan to do with this Learning Lab is to use it as a repository of images, concepts, facts, texts, and web-based information. In the coming months, I will develop a pedagogical approach that weaves together methods of research, visualization, and implementation into various applications of visual communication and graphic form. The Learning Lab will grow as our knowledge about this subject increases and while documenting our process of research, visualization, and implementation.

Research
Step 1 - Learning Lab
We will use the Learning Lab as a repository for our impressions and image collections that show the different ways in which guns have been woven into the mythology of America and seen in our collective culture. Using different lenses such as art, film, photography, sculpture, advertising, satirical cartoons, comics, pop culture, propaganda, and protest, my students and I will attempt to take apart and reconstruct our understanding of the many issues surrounding this divisive topic. 

Visualization and typographic experimentation
Step 2 - Weather Report
Dan Friedman, American, 1945–1995
While teaching at Yale University, Dan Friedman developed a teaching method that is still used in many schools today—the Weather Report. Through a series of detailed parameters, students will be asked to create different permutations that experiment with various interpretations and hierarchies. As students advance through this assignment, the limitations are slowly lifted, and students begin to generate solutions that are more and more expressive, dynamic, and experimental. Using this method, students will experiment with various hierarchies and typographic solutions—setting the stage for the letterpress printing process. 

Implementation 
Step 3 - Letterpress process 
Working with content generated from our research, relevant information, thought-provoking content, quotes, or statistics, students will explore various methods of experimenting with typographic structure and syntax. Using the Learning Lab, students will be exposed to the dynamic work of the Futurists, Constructivists, the Bauhaus, late Modernists, and the explosive typography of the New Wave designers.

Designers would include:

Filippo Tommaso Marinetti, Italian, 1876–1944

The Futurists were known (amongst other things) for the emotive and expressive typography.

El Lissitzky, Russian, 1890–1941
Russian Constructivism who experimented with developing a universal language based on simple shapes and reductive color.

Ladislav Sutnar, Czechoslovakian, 1897–1976
Sutnar’s visual communication often explains complex information and concepts unambiguously and with a spartan efficiency. The Constructivist brought great structure and organization to their typographic messages through minimal means in an attempt to generate a universal visual vocabulary.

Herbert Bayer, Austrian, 1900–1985
Jan Tschichold, German, 1902–1974
Max Bill, German, 1908–1994
At the Bauhaus and through its influences, designers brought together various conceptual approaches to the organization and implementation of articulate typographic applications.

Alvin Lustig, American, 1915–1955
American designer Alvin Lustig (along with Paul Rand, Bradbury Thompson, Lester Beall, Ladislav Sutnar, and others) was instrumental in developing a mature, Modern approach inspired by Europe to American graphic design and typography.

Wolfgang Weingart, German, 1941–
Teaches at the Basel School of Design and separating himself from some of Late Modernist’s more restrictive characteristics while redefining for himself an expressive typographic approach through experimentation and practice.

April Greiman, American, 1948–
Inspired by Armin Hofmann and Wolfgang Weingart and her experiences in Europe at the Basel School of Design, Greiman brought a fresh and unique perspective to graphic design within the United States.

Bruce Licher, American, 1958–
American typographer and letterpress designer that works within the traditions of letterpress printing while pushing the edges of typography, unique form, and graphic design applications.


Professor Ned Drew
Graphic Design Faculty
Rutgers University-Newark

Founding Director of The Design Consortium & XPress | Center for Typography initiatives at Express Newark

Co-Founder
BRED | a collaborative design lab
www.brednation.com
Instagram: bred_letterpress



 

 

Ned Drew
137
 

Jamestown See Think Wonder

( Curated to support Virginia Standards of Learning for the  Virginia Studies course.)


Debbie Tannenbaum
9
 

Art & Culture Sort

First, sort the images by type of art/artist. Teacher should make index card headings for the following categories: Painting/Painter, Textile/Weaver, Clothing/Fashion Designer, Architecture/Architect, Prints/Printmaker, Sculpture/Sculptor, Functional Ceramics/Potter or Ceramist. Sometimes an image may cross categories (painting of a house might be categorized in architecture or painting); either answer would be acceptable if the student can justify why.

Second, make an educated guess about culture represented in selected images. Students can "guess and check" with teacher. Online research option: students work in pairs to access this collection and click on the info button for an image to learn about the maker, time period, and culture. They can record their findings to help answer the reflection questions below.

After the sorting activities, ask students to choose an image and answer: Why is/was this object of value (or useful)? How do you think it expresses something important to the people of that culture?

Jean-Marie Galing
28
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