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Found 899 Collections

 

What makes a place? Memorials in the U.S.

This playlist on "What makes a place? Memorials in the U.S." is designed for self-guided learning with intermittent check-ins for  students. The learning tasks are divided over five days, designed for 30-35 minutes per day, and build on each other. However, students are able to work on this playlist at their own pace. They will engage with visual, video, and written texts. Students have the option to complete the tasks online by connecting through Google classroom or print word doc versions of each formative and summative assessments for work offline. By the end of the week, students will create a work of art. 

  • Formative assessments are represented by a chevron (Learning Task and Learning Check In).
  • Summative assessments are represented by a circle (Final Task).
  • Word doc versions of all formative and summative assessments are in the tiles immediately after the digital versions. 


Stephanie Hammer
39
 

With Great Power Comes Great Responsibility

I created this collection for families to do together while schools are closed. I will be making a collection a day while we are out of school. Today we will be exploring superheroes. The idea is for families to look at the items in the collection and consider what they see in the objects and paintings, what they think, and what they wonder. Families can also watch videos about creating Marvel Comics as well as a video about a really amazing comic book store owner. At the end of the collection I have provided a few ideas for families about what to do next.

If you want to learn more about more about See Think Wonder you can click here to see a video of a teacher using the routine in her classroom.

Ellen Rogers
58
 

Caretakers: Compare and Contrast Activity

Step 1:  Compare two artworks... what's similar and different? Step 2: Look closely to uncover the big idea of one artwork. How does your thinking change when you see two artworks, side-by-side?

Elizabeth Dale-Deines
26
 

Photographer: Fassbender, Adolf

#nmahphc

This is a selection of photogravures by Adolf Fassbender.

For additional images, search collection.si.edu.

Keywords: photomechanical, art photography, Pictorialism

NMAH Photographic History Collection
35
 

Caretakers: Zoom In Activity

Zoom in on a small part of an artwork, tell stories, then zoom out! A discussion-based looking activity.

Elizabeth Dale-Deines
26
 

Picturing Community

How do we define community today? Through social media our connections with family, friends and acquaintances are increasingly widespread. And yet we are still drawn to the idea of small communities and the face-to-face interactions they promote. The artists represented in this learning lab module explore this concept through a series of related portraits of families, friends, neighbors, and various identity groups.

After completing this learning lab module, students will be better able to:

  • Identify and analyze key components of a portrait
  • Explore the definition of “community” and its relevance in their own lives.

#NPGteach

Nicole Vance
55
 

Elementary Economics

This playlist on economics is designed for self-guided learning with intermittent check-ins for elementary age students. The learning tasks are divided over five days, designed for 30-35 minutes per day, and build on each other. However, students are able to work on this playlist at their own pace. They will engage with primary and secondary sources as well as visual, video, and written texts. Students have the option to complete the tasks online by connecting through Google classroom or access Google doc versions of each formative and summative assessments for work online and/or offline. By the end of the week, students will create a marketplace that demonstrates understanding of basic economic principles.

  • Formative assessments are represented by a chevron (Learning Check In and Tasks).
  • Summative assessments are represented by a circle (Final Task).
  • Google doc versions of all formative and summative assessments are in the tiles immediately after the digital versions. 

*Social Studies and Visual Arts standards vary by state for elementary grades. We recommend educators and caregivers consult their student and child's state standards for these two subjects.

National Museum of American History
76
 

Cultural Communications: Telling Our Stories

Language is the very first tool that we use to understand the ideas that we are trying to share. But what about the monuments, art, and songs that we have created to share our ideas with one another? This exploration will focus on how American culture founded on the mixing of ethnicities and experiences used the skills and talents of its members to reveal its faults and celebrate its wonder and imagination. This collection focuses on the identities and expressions of 1st Nations People, African American, and White American cultures. There are so many other cultures that have contributed to this nations story, this is just one exploration of many that we should embark on to tell our stories of who we are as a people and a nation. This exploration will give students a way to examine the history of those around them, but also their place within this most extravagant quilt of this country. 

  • The purpose of this activity is to give students a better understanding of the American Indian identity of the United States as foundational to understanding this land. From that foundation they will journey through the musical/dance expressions of those who came to be known as White Americans and African Americans, who came to inhabit the US and through them some of the historical/contemporary realities and perspectives that make up a part of our society.

Please follow the lesson plan laid out at the beginning of the collection to see the best way to use it. #goglobal

Sean Felix
73
 

Perfume: The Story of a Murderer - Writing & Discussion Activities

This collection is used to launch the novel "Perfume: The Story of a Murderer." This is a novel which nearly defies categorization. Suskind, the writer ventures into a creative territory few students read in high school. Instead of beginning the unit with general background and context about the novel, we begin from an emotional point - - what emotions and experiences are prompted by the setting, mood, atmosphere, etc.? Below are the general steps we follow:                           #SAAMteach

1. Pairs of students are each given two different paintings (I have a very small class - 12 students - - and choose to give each group two in order to cover more; however, you could easily do this with a class of 24 and each group of two has one painting.)

2. Each group has a graphic organizer which is a modified "See/Think/Wonder" format, coupled with a brainstorming opportunity regarding the emotions generated by this painting. They're given approximately 10 minutes to work their way through the paintings and complete the lists for each, as they discuss, etc. I print out the pictures for them because I don't want them to see the titles and any additional information they may find online.

3. When they have about 10 minutes, the students each have an opportunity to walk their classmates through the paintings and then open up the floor for a discussion about the emotions conveyed through this work.

4. We keep a running list of these emotions on the board. Some that have surfaced include: confusion, disgust, loneliness, repugnance, helplessness, panic, anger, fear... Next to this list we wrote some overall concepts, such as abstract mixed with realism, abandonment, intimidation, and disconnect...

5. When completed, I'll lead the conversation to a discussion about how these very same emotions are reflected by and presented within the novel...but like the paintings, in very unique ways. I choose my words carefully so as not to give the entire first few chapters away, but at the same time, offering them a preview. We then read the first two paragraphs out loud, and discuss how so many of the elements noted on the board are present already.

6. They're then assigned Chapters 1, 2, and 3 to read, with a "list" of suggested items to watch for, annotate, etc. as they complete their first close reading of the novel. (This assignment is attached.)

7. Part II involves writing in response to one of the paintings, completed after students have read the novel. (See Google Doc directions)

Annette Spahr
15
 

Printing at Home

Producing printed products is a hobby that many Americans enjoy today, but technology has not always allowed the ease and affordability to enjoy this pastime. Before one-click internet publishing, before pocket-sized printers, and before word processors, there was the tabletop printing press.

In the 1860s the invention, manufacture, and distribution of tabletop printing presses expanded the hobby of self-publishing. Printing technology was once rarely found outside of printing shops and publishing houses, but the tabletop printing press allowed for publishing at home—or in any location. 

(This Learning Lab collection is a virtual reinterpretation of a physical exhibit in the National Museum of American History. Exhibit labels can be found by clicking the paper clip icon next to each artifact.)

Joan Boudreau
25
 

If You Build the Collection, They Will Come

I created this collection for families to do together while schools are closed. I will be making a collection a day while we are out of school. Today we will be exploring baseball. The idea is for families to look at the items in the collection and consider what they see in the objects and paintings, what they think, and what they wonder. Families can also watch a free Brainpop video about baseball, watch a video about the Jackie Robinson, and learn about women's baseball. At the end of the collection I have provided a few ideas for families about what to do next.

If you want to learn more about more about See Think Wonder you can click here to see a video of a teacher using the routine in her classroom.

Ellen Rogers
51
 

Ekphrastic Poetry

Students will learn how to write a poem inspired by artwork.

Shantelle Jones-Williams
10
 

Subject: Agriculture

#nmahphc

This is an assortment of photographs from the Photographic History Collection broadly related to agriculture. The photographs seen here were created with a variety of formats and process, and for a variety of purposes by amateur and professional photographers.

For additional related photographs, see Learning Lab collections Eateries, Kitchens, Food, and Meals and Eating.

For additional images, search collections.si.edu.

Keywords: barns, farms, crops, fields, plows, tractors, farmers, agriculture workers, horses, wagons, animal husbandry, cows, pigs, chickens, field hands, fences, hay, hay bale, hay stack, rakes, hoes, gardens, windmill, water trough, digging, orchard, ranch

NMAH Photographic History Collection
106
 

Humans and the Footprints We Leave: Smithsonian-Montgomery College Faculty Fellowship 2020 Opening Panel Resources

This collection serves as an introduction to the opening panel of the 2020 Smithsonian-Montgomery College Faculty Fellowship Program. This year's theme is “Humans and the Footprints We Leave: Climate Change and Other Critical Challenges." Three Smithsonian staff members will present at the session, including Igor Krupnik (Curator of Arctic and Northern Ethnology collections and Head of the Ethnology Division at the National Museum of Natural History), Alison Cawood (Citizen Science Coordinator at the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center), and Ashley Peery (Educator for the exhibition "Outbreak: Epidemics in a Connected World, " at the National Museum of Natural History). Their bios, presentation descriptions, and other resources are included inside.

As you explore these resources, be sure to jot down any questions you have for the presenters. It is sure to be a fascinating and fruitful seminar series!

#MCteach

Philippa Rappoport
17
 

What makes a place? Landmarks around the world

This playlist on landmarks is designed for self-guided learning with intermittent check-ins for elementary age students. The learning tasks are divided over five days, designed for 30-35 minutes per day, and build on each other. However, students are able to work on this playlist at their own pace. They will engage with primary and secondary sources as well as visual, video, audio, and written texts. Students have the option to complete the tasks online by connecting through Google classroom or access Google doc versions of each formative and summative assessments for work online and/or offline. By the end of the week, students will conduct an oral history interview and/or write a brief constructed response that demonstrates understanding of landmarks and what makes a place significant.

  • Formative assessments are represented by a chevron (Learning Check In and Tasks).
  • Summative assessments are represented by a circle (Final Task).
  • Google doc versions of all formative and summative assessments are in the tiles immediately after the digital versions. 

*Social Studies and Visual Arts standards vary by state for elementary grades. We recommend educators and caregivers consult their student and child's state standards for these two subjects.

National Museum of American History
48
 

Photographer: Colo, Papo

#nmahphc

This is a collection of work by Puerto Rican performance artist Papo Calo from the Photographic History Collection. The photographs form the portfolio Photogenics that include images from the series Photo Poems, 1979 and Acting as Behavior, 1982.

Copyright Papo Calo.

For additional images, search collections.si.edu

Keywords: performance art, alternative photography, photography projects, photography related to performance art, expression, photography and text, photography and language, Latino photographer

NMAH Photographic History Collection
19
 

Caretakers: Bringing Art to Life Activity

Encourage your student to get creative with what's around the home and recreate an artwork!

Elizabeth Dale-Deines
11
 

Caretakers: Describe & Draw Activity

A fun game for students to practice their listening and speaking/descriptive skills! 

Elizabeth Dale-Deines
14
 

Panamanian Passages | Pasajes Panameños

This collection highlights the science, geography, cultural contributions, including those of native peoples of Panama, and the 20th century history of Panama. This includes the science and geography of the Isthmus, the Panama Canal, the U.S. in Panama and US expansionism and cross-cultural exchange. It will give students an opportunity to learn an overview of U.S. history in Latin America and Panamanian contributions to world history.  The collection includes bilingual (English and Spanish) activities for middle school and high school students including a scavenger hunt like worksheet and discussion questions for group conversations or individual essay statements that focus on historical inquiry-based learning. 

Esta colección bilingüe resalta la ciencia, la geografía y las contribuciones culturales, incluyendo las de comunidades indígenas y las de la historia del siglo 20, de Panamá. La colección incluye la ciencia y la geografía del istmo, el Canal de Panamá, el expansionismo estadounidense y los intercambios culturales entre ambos. Les dará a los estudiantes una oportunidad de aprender un resumen de la historia estadounidense en Latinoamérica y las contribuciones panameñas a la historia mundial. La colección incluye actividades bilingües para estudiantes de secundaria y preparatoria incluyendo una hoja de ejercicios con un juego de tesoro y preguntas de discusión en grupo. También incluye preguntas para ensayos.


Smithsonian Latino Center
6
 

Cultural Expressions: Spoken Connections and Poetry

This collection features the Spoken Connections Workshop along with four Smithsonian Latino Center programs celebrating Latino poetry and spoken word. This collection is for middle school and high school students, along with life-long learners, with an interest exploring world cultures, language arts, and creative writing.

This workshop PDF includes poetry from Puerto Rican and African American poets, including Martin Espada. The collection includes activities on defining culture and brainstorming your cultural home. Through these activities, learners will develop further understanding on culture characteristics, values, and how culture influences our everyday lives. Skills developed through this collection include interpersonal and intrapersonal conversations, learning how to use graphic organizers, and developing creative writing skills using vehicles such as free response and poetry. 

This collection also features Smithsonian Latino Center Poetry Programs to complement the activity itself through visual performance. Caridad De La Luz aka La Bruja (New York City) and Francisco X. Alarcón (Los Angeles/Davis) honor memory and ancestors during Day of the Dead, Quique Avilés (Washington, DC), Leticia Hernández-Linares (Los Angeles/San Francisco), Raquel Gutiérrez (Los Angeles/Bay Area), and José B. González (Connecticut) perform at a special enceuntro or encounter of Salvadoran poets. A memorable event of music and spoken word curated by Luis Alberto Ambroggio featured performances by local poets Alberto Avendaño, Quique Avilés, Naomi Ayala, José Ballesteros, Consuelo Hernández, Samuel Miranda, Egla Morales, and Carlos Parada, with music by singer/songwriter Patricio Zamorano and his band. 

Smithsonian Latino Center
5
 

¡Descubra! Hispanic Heritage

This collection features bilingual (English/Spanish) activities from ¡Descubra!, the Smithsonian Latino Center’s national public education program for kids, teens, and families. These activities were featured at previous Smithsonian Latino Center Hispanic Heritage festivals celebrating Latino art, music, and cultures. These resources can serve teachers and students grades 2-5, 6-8, and high school Spanish.

The activities help participants place themselves in the role of an artist, whether a poet, musician, or sculptor. There are also fun activities for caregivers and families in capturing family music memories through oral histories and archiving special memories with photographs. Through active learning and problem solving, students are fully engaged and better able to understand concepts being presented. This collection also includes video performances and interviews with Latino animators, artists, curators, dancers, and even educators, among others.  

¡Descubra! Hispanic Heritage promotes Latino arts and culture contributions while showcasing opportunities to become involved in cultural representation and different interests in these areas.


Esta colección resalta actividades bilingües de ¡Descubra!, el programa nacional educativo del Centro Latino Smithsonian para niños, adolecentes y familias. Estas actividades fueron presentadas en festivales de herencia hispana previos del Centro Latino Smithsonian que celebraban arte, música y cultura hispana. Estos recursos les pueden servir a maestros y estudiantes de grados 2-5, 6-8, y de clases de español de preparatoria (high school).

Las actividades ayudan a participantes imaginase en un papel de artista, fuese un poeta, un músico o escultor. Encontrará actividades divertidas para cuidadores y familias que captan memorias musicales de familia a través de entrevistas y otra sobre como archivar memorias especiales con fotos. A través del aprendizaje y resolviendo problemas, los estudiantes pueden entender mejor las ideas que se les presentan. Esta colección también incluye videos de presentaciones y entrevistas de animadores, artistas, bailarines, curadores y hasta educadores, además de otros.

¡Descubra! Hispanic Heritage resalta las contribuciones de la comunidad hispana al arte y la cultura estadounidense mientras promueve oportunidades para involucrarse en la representación cultural y las diferentes áreas dentro del campo.

Smithsonian Latino Center
43
 

Domingo Ulloa's "Braceros": and "Bittersweet Harvest": Using Art and Historical Documentation to Deepen Understanding

This teaching collection helps students to look closely and think critically by examining Domigo Ulloa's painting, Braceros, and historical documentation related to the bracero program, a series of short-term labor contracts from 1942-1964 in which an estimated two million Mexican men came to the US to work on farms and roads. The collection prompts students to consider the program from a variety of perspectives, including individual, collective, social, economic, and political.  

Included here are the painting, a bilingual video with Smithsonian American Art Museum (SAAM) curator E. Carmen Ramos, four suggested Thinking Routines - "See, Think, Wonder," "Step In, Step Out, Step Back," "The 3 Y's," and "Think, Feel, Care" - from Harvard's Project Zero Artful Thinking and Global Thinking materials, supporting digital content from the National Museum of American History, and a blogpost from SAAM of two DC student's written responses to the prompt, "What Domingo Ulloa's Braceros Means to Me." 

For use in Social Studies, Spanish, English, and American History classes

#LatinoHAC #EthnicStudies

This collection supports Unit 1: Intersectionality of Economics, Politics, and Policy, of the Austin ISD Ethnic Studies Part B course.

This Smithsonian Learning Lab collection received Federal support from the Latino Initiatives Pool, administered by the Smithsonian Latino Center. 


Philippa Rappoport
10
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