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Found 943 Collections

 

Well Behaved Women Rarely Become Famous

A collection of portraits of women that defied conventions of their day. Portraits chosen for this collection could lead to a discussion on the evolution of feminism in the US.  It includes several learning to look strategies.

This collection was created in conjunction with the National Portrait Gallery's 2019 Learning to Look Summer Teacher Institute.

#npgteach

Kimmel Kozak
23
 

Art and Exercise: Yoga and Sandpainting

Summary:

Students will learn that exercise changes how they feel, and how they feel can change what they are able to do. While learning about yoga, students will make sand painting inspired by artists around the world.

Essential Questions:

How can exercise change the way we feel? What kind of art can we make when we are calm? What can we do to feel calmer during the day?

Art Standards:

VA:Cr1.1.Pk - Engage in self-directed play with materials

VA:Cn10.1.Pk -  Explore the world using descriptive and expressive words and art-making.

Day One:  

Materials: Colored pencils, coloring sheets,

Compare a neatly colored sheet to a sheet with scribbles. What do you notice? Which one shows care? How do we know? Demonstrate coloring within the lines using one colored pencil at a time. Children can choose one coloring sheet, and complete it at their desk. Look closely at the first image "Indian Man Making Sand Painting." Participate in See Think Wonder thinking routine. Direct students to think about what the person is doing, and how they are feeling.

Day Two:

Materials: Colored pencils, coloring sheets

Watch video about Tibetan sand painting. Participate in See Think Wonder thinking routine. Why would you need to be calm to make this kind of work? What can we do to feel calm? Document answers. Reminders about coloring: within the lines using one colored pencil at a time. Children can choose one coloring sheet, and complete it at their desk.

Day Three:

Materials: Colored pencils, coloring sheets

What can we do to feel calm? Participate in short yoga video. Ask students how do they feel? Document student answers. Reminders about coloring: within the lines using one colored pencil at a time. Children can choose one coloring sheet, and complete it at their desk. Alternatively, students can finish a previous coloring sheet.

Day Four:

Materials: trays, colored sand, small containers (ice cube trays or similar would be ideal)

Teacher demonstrates sand painting. Emphasis on moving slowly, using pinching, having a plan, not bumping the tray, etc. If there is time, have one student also try sand painting while teacher and students narrate what they are doing. Ask students, how do we need to feel to do this kind of work? Participate in short yoga video. Transition to tables. Students make sand paintings, teachers document student work with photographs. Afterwards, ask why was it so important for us to feel calm for this work? What did we do to make sure that we felt calm? What would have happened if we were jumping around?

Keywords: yoga, sand, mandala, exercise, sandpainting, Tibetan, American Indian, Two Rivers

#LearnWithTR

Allison Yood
8
 

Art and Exercise: Large Drawings and Strength Training

Summary:

Students will learn that exercise changes how they feel, and how they feel can change what they are able to do.While learning about muscles and strength training, students will create large scale drawings using their whole body in the style of artist Heather Hansen.

Essential Questions:

How can exercise change the way we feel? When might we need to be strong? What can we do to make our bodies stronger? How can we use our muscles to make art?

Art Standards:

VA:Cr1.1.Pk - Engage in self-directed play with materials

VA:Cn10.1.Pk -  Explore the world using descriptive and expressive words and art-making.

Day One:

Materials: Playdoh, trays

Show children playdoh. How do I use this? Don't mix the colors. Keep it on the tray or in your hands. Close the container when finished. Never take any playdoh with you.  Squeeze a ball of playdoh in your hands. Have children feel your bicept, notice the difference in my arm. These are my muscles. At tables, have children use playdoh. Encourage children to squeeze playdoh and feel their arms.

Day Two:

Materials: Playdoh, trays

 Watch film "Weightlifting at the Zoo." Participate in See, Think, Wonder thinking routine. Direct the conversation to why animals might need to be strong and what they are doing to make sure that they are strong. At tables, have children use playdoh. Encourage children to squeeze playdoh and feel their arms.

Day Three:

Materials: chalk, black paper

Ask children when does someone use their strength? Why might someone want to become stronger? Document their answers. Show children chalk. How would you use this? Make sure that you are careful because it can break easily. If you drop it on the floor, pick it up right away. Use one piece of chalk at a time. Draw only on your own paper. Send children to tables to draw on paper with chalk.

Day Four:

Materials: Large paper taped to the floor, chalk, playdoh, trays

Watch video of Heather Hansen working. Participate in See, Think, Wonder thinking routine. How would we do this kind of work? Demonstrate how to draw like Heather Hansen. In small groups have children try drawing in the style of Heather Hansen. Children who are not drawing can use playdoh.

(This lesson make take more than one day)

Day Five:

Materials: Large paper taped to the floor, chalk taped to weights, playdoh, trays

Show students chalk taped to weights. Today we will continue working like Heather Hansen, but using these instead. Demonstrate using the weights on large paper. How do you think this will be different? Will it be easier or harder? In small groups have children try drawing in the style of Heather Hansen. Children who are not drawing can use play doh.  What would happen if we didn't have strong muscles for this work? What can we do to make our muscles stronger. 

(This lesson make take more than one day)

Key Words: muscle, strength, weight, lift, Heather Hansen, body, exercise, Two Rivers

#LearnWithTR

Allison Yood
7
 

Humanity and Technology

#SAAMteach

English Language Arts

11/12

Students will explore themes relating to the connection between humanity and technology using a variety of media.

Sara Noah
8
 

American Flag/Washington DC Flag Lesson, One or Two Part

With this collection, students will use a version of the Zoom In thinking routine to analyze several flags with an eye toward creating their own flag at the end of the lesson.

The Guiding Questions used in this lesson are:

-How did the United States flag change over time?

-Why do countries feel that it's important to have a single flag?

The Big Idea for this lesson is:

Simple symbols, like the those presented on flags, can represent a lot about a country's past and what makes that country unique.  

In this lesson, students will begin by exploring the collection and answering, using the quiz tool,  the questions embedded about the two early versions of the American flag.  The questions push students to analyze each flag, consider how versions of the American flag changed, and think critically about how symbolism can be used in a flag to represent unique and/or historical aspects of a country. 

Once students have completed the quiz questions, the teacher will call them together to discuss  the evolution of the American flag and what the elements of the flag's current and former designs represent.  The teacher will then turn the class's attention to the Washington DC flag and reiterate that its design was taken from George Washington's English ancestry.  Using this as another example of a flag drawing upon elements of history, the teacher will  make the point that the DC flag hasn't changed in appearance in over 80 years.  

The class will brainstorm what they feel are the most important and/or interesting aspects of DC history based on what they have studied.  They will then brainstorm symbols that could be used to abstractly represent elements of DC's unique past, status, and culture.  

Once a number of good ideas have been generated, each student will have the chance to create their own version of the DC flag, either modifying the exiting version of creating a completely new design.  On the draft sheets will be a checklist that focus's students attention on the  most important aspects of any flag, namely its symbolism and its connection to the history of the place it represents.  

If the teacher wishes to make this a longer activity featuring multiple drafts, he or she can consider looping in the art teacher to discuss concepts of sketching and design.  

#LearnwithTR



Peter Gamber
5
 

How Did We Get Here?: Introduction to Flying Machines

This is a  collection designed to introduce students to the history of aviation as told through the lens of the scientific method-design process. Students begin by thinking about why is flight important in our lives, and how did we get to the airplanes we now know? Students look at the many designs that planes have gone through, and discuss why perseverance and problem-solving are important skills to have. They also see that teamwork, cooperation, and a desire to succeed were necessary for the Wright Brothers to do their important work. Feel free to pick and choose from the resources in creating your own collections:


Overall Learning Outcomes:

  • Scientists use trial and error to form conclusions.
  • Scientists test hypotheses using multiple trials in order to get accurate results and form strong conclusions. 
  • Scientists use multiple data and other evidence to  form strong conclusions about a topic.
  • Scientists work together to apply scientific research and knowledge to create new designs that meet human needs. 
  • Scientists help each other persevere through mistakes to learn new ideas.

Guiding Questions for Students to Answer from this collection:

  • Why is flight important?
  • How do scientists solve problems?
  • How do scientists collect data to help them solve problems?



#LearnwithTR

Katherine Dunn
8
 

Inspiration: Ancient Greece and Ancient Rome in Our Nation's Capital

In this collection, students will work with images of buildings from ancient Greece and ancient Rome along with images of iconic buildings in Washington, D.C. to identify ways that early Americans were inspired by ancient Greeks and Romans. #LearnWithTR

Nicole Clark
7
 

Symbols: Using Images to Invoke Feelings

In this collection, students will work with Americana images to do a "close view" that will allow them to make inferences about which feelings did the artists intend to invoke by using symbols. #LearnWithTR

Nicole Clark
9
 

Making the Old New: Rethinking Monuments and Memorials

In this collection, students will work with images, videos, and texts related to Marta Minujín's "Parthenon of Books" to create a series of questions that a creator must ask and answer before designing a memorial or monument. #LearnWithTR

Nicole Clark
8
 

Mosquito! Podcasting Module

In this modular, multi-part lesson, learners will focus on a Sidedoor podcast discussing mosquitoes. Learners will focus on the content the podcast is delivering and then analyze the podcast for production techniques. The content of the podcast will give the team a base understanding for the focus of their own podcast.

#YAGSidedoor2019

Sidedoor for Educators
7
 

"¡Pleibol!”: Close Looking to Explore One Family’s Story of Latino Baseball

This teaching collection helps students to look closely and think critically by using three Thinking Routines to explore the cultural relevance of one family's baseball-related objects from an exhibition at the National Museum of American History, "¡Pleibol!: In the Barrios and the Big Leagues." The exhibition seeks to document the history of Latino culture through the lens of baseball, and explores baseball not only as a pastime close to the hearts of many people in many communities, but also for Latinos as a place to advocate for rights and social justice. 

Finally, the prompts aid students in looking closely at a personal object of their choice and teasing out the story it tells.

Included here are the objects themselves, a bilingual video with curator Margaret Salazar-Porzio, three suggested Thinking Routines - "See, Think, Wonder," "The 3 Y's," and "Picture Writing" - from Harvard's Project Zero Artful Thinking and Global Thinking materials, and supporting digital content about the exhibition. 

For use in Social Studies, Spanish, English, and American History classes

#LatinoHAC #EthnicStudies



Philippa Rappoport
14
 

History and Portraiture: Utilizing Art to Teach American History, Colonial America to the Civil War

This Learning Lab contains a five unit curriculum that puts students in conversation with a diverse group of significant Americans from the colonial era to the present. Lessons on the Elements of Portrayal, Symbols, Labels, Letter Writing, and Portrait Pairing prompt students to analyze the lasting impact of remarkable individuals from the Portrait Gallery’s collection. This collection was originally created in collaboration with Alice Deal Middle School in Washington D.C. 

#NPGteach

Briana White
84
 

Grandma's Thanksgiving Visit

This interactive play created by Creative Tools for Teaching team is infused with pre-literacy, pre-numeracy, and inquiry-based activities. It celebrates family and the many things we are thankful for! Grandma has arrived for the holiday—and that can only mean making puppets, cooking together, washing the car, and learning lots of fun new things. This musical play with a great big heart brings the whole audience into the family with singing, finger play, and call-and response as we all give thanks for being together. Presented by Discovery Theater--a pan-institutional museum theater dedicated to bringing theatre to young audiences and general visitors on and off the Mall since 1969. 

Discovery Theater
69
 

Going the Distance

Discovery Theater is a pan-institutional museum theater dedicated to bringing theatre to young audiences and general visitors on and off the Mall since 1969.Race to the finish line with two black Olympians who changed history! Soaring music and the exhilaration of world-class sorts inspire us all to greatness in this vivid portrayal of the lives of Jesse Owens and Wilma Rudolph. Watch them overcome childhood illness, infirmity, and poverty to become the world’s fastest man and fastest woman, winning the greatest honor in athletics: the Olympic Gold medal. The John Cornelius II score speaks to the heart and soul of the winner in all of us.

Discovery Theater
48
 

Beautiful Day in the Neighborhood

Meet the butcher, baker, pizza-dough maker, and all of the friendly people who make our neighborhoods terrific places to live every day. Recycled crafting and interactive songs make this community day the perfect blend of learning and just plain fun.

Discovery Theater
36
 

Science Tellers: Escape from Earth

Discovery Theater is a pan-institutional museum theater dedicated to bringing theatre to young audiences and general visitors on and off the Mall since 1969. Throughout this amazing intergalactic story, we use science experiments to bring the story to life! In the second part of the show, we go “behind the scenes” of the special effects and recreate the science experiments with the help of volunteers from the audience. Don’t miss this action-packed and educational alien adventure. It's totally out of this world!

Discovery Theater
42
 

St. Paddy’s Day w/Pete Moss & The Bog Band

Discovery Theater is a pan-institutional museum theater dedicated to bringing theatre to young audiences and general visitors on and off the Mall since 1969. The Bog Band is a group of young musicians who are “mad” for traditional Irish music and dance. Led by Pete Moss (a/k/a Mitch Fanning), they raise the roof to celebrate Saint Patrick’s Day with live Irish music and throw ion some lively step dancing. Add in a little cultural background and “Sure and it’ll be a rattlin’ good time!”  A Music in our schools Month program.

Discovery Theater
30
 

Science of Spring

Discovery Theater is a pan-institutional museum theater dedicated to bringing theatre to young audiences and general visitors on and off the Mall since 1969.  The magic of earth science takes center stage in this fun, interactive Discovery Theater original as we explore the indigenous and modern science behind the greening of the year.  Using science, culture and history, we examine humanity’s relationship to the natural ‘new year’ – a time when the earth and its creatures experience the rebirth, regeneration and new growth. Seed germination pairs with the story of Persephone returning from underground; the science and mystery of a simple egg link with new birth and lambs, birds and bunnies tales; the earth science of warming spring weather create a great atmosphere for learning and fun.  

Discovery Theater
48
 

Taiko Drums

Discovery Theater is a pan-institutional museum theater dedicated to bringing theatre to young audiences and general visitors on and off the Mall since 1969.  The world’s most dangerous half-Japanese/half-Scottish solo improvisational taiko drum artist combines this traditional form of powerful playing on huge “Taiko” (drum) with a modern vibe, creating  participatory performances that rock the house and educate all the senses. Taiko players are their own instruments—the body dances as the music pours forth with massive sound and energy.  Experience Mark and his music in a dynamic show that celebrates this fierce Japanese artform.  

Discovery Theater
36
 

Jojo’s Backyard Safari

Discovery Theater is a pan-institutional museum theater dedicated to bringing theatre to young audiences and general visitors on and off the Mall since 1969. It's time for high adventure as Jojo goes on the lookout for all kinds of fascinating creatures in the wilds of his very own yard. What will he find hidden in plain sight? Come along on the trek as we learn, create, and play in this musical mini-travelogue about the hidden natural world close to home.

Discovery Theater
62
 

"Diary: December 12, 1941," internment in America, and the literature of exile

Beginning with Roger Shimomura's "Diary: December 12, 1941," students will engage with a variety of primary and secondary documents, works of art, and interviews as an entry point into Mohsin Hamid's contemporary work of magical realism, Exit, West.  

Aerie Treska
28
 

George Tooker

Artifacts for a lesson examining The Waiting Room, a painting by the artist George Tooker, a social realist.#SAAMteach

Kiki Pavlechko
11
 

Slow Looking: Untitled, by El Anatsui

In this collection, students will explore an artwork by El Anatsui, a contemporary artist whose recent work addresses global ideas about the environment, consumerism, and the social history and memory of the "stuff" of our lives. After looking closely and exploring the artwork using an adapted version of Project Zero's "Parts, Purposes, and Complexities" routine, students will create a "diamante" poem using their observations of the artwork and knowledge they gained about El Anatsui's artistic influences. Additional resources about El Anatsui, how to look at African Art, and Project Zero Thinking Routines are located at the end of the collection.

This collection was created for the "Smithsonian Learning Lab, Focus on Global Arts and Humanities" session at the 2019 New Jersey Principals and Supervisors Association (NJPSA) Arts Integration Leadership Institute. 

Keywords: nigeria, african art, textile, poetry, creative writing, analysis

Deborah Stokes
20
 

Marvel

Marvel's extra audio and picture stuff.

Smithsonian Summer Camp
12
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