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Found 889 Collections

 

AFRICAN COSMOS

Put the ARTS in STEM - From Egypt to South Africa, take a brief tour of the African Cosmos  and have your students discover the intersection of Art and Astronomy in the southern hemisphere.   Explore constellations only seen on the African continent.  See why the Goliath beetle became a symbol of rebirth for the Egyptian scarab.  Learn about celestial navigation by people and animals. 

Create Your Own Constellation!  Request Activity sheets for your classroom.

Submit your class constellations to our Student Gallery and be a part of your own school's online exhibition!


Jessica Radovich
73
 

Raindrops Keep Falling on My Head

I created this collection for families to do together while schools are closed. I will be making a collection a day while we are out of school. Today we will be exploring rain. The idea is for families to look at the items in the collection and consider what they see in the objects and paintings, what they think, and what they wonder. Families can also watch a free Brainpop video about weather, the water cycle and thunderstorms. Families can also read articles about rain, learn about how native peoples interact with rain, and listen to a read aloud in the hopes to keep families from feeling bored. At the end of the collection I have provided a few ideas for families about what to do next.

If you want to learn more about more about See Think Wonder you can click here to see a video of a teacher using the routine in her classroom.

Ellen Rogers
50
 

Labor Organizing in the US

This playlist on Labor Organizing in the U.S. is designed for self-guided learning with intermittent check-ins for high school age students. The learning tasks are divided over five days, designed for 30-35 minutes per day, and build on each other. However, students are able to work on this playlist at their own pace. They will engage with primary and secondary sources as well as visual, video, written, and audio texts. Students have the option to complete the tasks online by connecting through Google classroom or print PDF versions of each formative and summative assessments for work offline. By the end of the week, students will create work of art that represents work people are doing today to create change in a current social issue.

  • Formative assessments are represented by a chevron (Learning Check In, Tasks, and Guides).
  • Summative assessments are respresented by a circle (Quiz and Final Task).
  • PDF versions of all formative and summative assessments are in the tiles immediately after the digital versions. 


National Museum of American History
66
 

Maps and Globes

Maps, Globes, and a story

Linda Jaeger
18
 

Umbrellas for a Rainy Day

Umbrellas and the Water Cycle

Linda Jaeger
14
 

Flowers

Linda Jaeger
19
 

Labor Organizing in the US

This playlist on Labor Organizing in the U.S. is designed for self-guided learning with intermittent check-ins for high school age students. The learning tasks are divided over five days, designed for 30-35 minutes per day, and build on each other. However, students are able to work on this playlist at their own pace. They will engage with primary and secondary sources as well as visual, video, written, and audio texts. Students have the option to complete the tasks online by connecting through Google classroom or print PDF versions of each formative and summative assessments for work offline. By the end of the week, students will create work of art that represents work people are doing today to create change in a current social issue.

  • Formative assessments are represented by a chevron (Learning Check In, Tasks, and Guides).
  • Summative assessments are respresented by a circle (Quiz and Final Task).
  • PDF versions of all formative and summative assessments are in the tiles immediately after the digital versions. 


Matt Hart
66
 

What makes a place? Memorials in the U.S.

This playlist on "What makes a place? Memorials in the U.S." is designed for self-guided learning with intermittent check-ins for elementary school age students. The learning tasks are divided over five days, designed for 30-35 minutes per day, and build on each other. However, students are able to work on this playlist at their own pace. They will engage with visual, video, and written texts. Students have the option to complete the tasks online by connecting through Google classroom or print word doc versions of each formative and summative assessments for work offline. By the end of the week, students will create a work of art. Modify the lessons as needed.

  • Formative assessments are represented by a chevron (Learning Task and Learning Check In).
  • Summative assessments are represented by a circle (Final Task).
  • Word doc versions of all formative and summative assessments are in the tiles immediately after the digital versions. 

*Social Studies and Visual Arts standards vary by state for elementary grades. We recommend educators and caregivers consult their student and child's state standards for these two subjects.

National Museum of American History
39
 

Every Picture Has a Story

In the lesson in this issue of Smithsonian in Your Classroom, students closely examines four of the 13 million photographs in the Smithsonian. The pictures represent four important steps in the history of the medium: the introduction of portrait photography, the invention of a photographic printing process, the capture of instantaneous action, and the advent of home photography.

Click on the PDF icon to download the issue.


Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access
5
 

My Life as a Refugee

"No one plans to become a refugee—to flee your home because your life is in danger. Yet today, there are 25.9 million refugees, more than the world has seen in nearly a century.

There are many reasons a person might become a refugee.

Maybe you live in a country torn apart by war, and your house was bombed to rubble.

Maybe you live in a place where you and your family are being attacked for your religious beliefs.

Maybe you live in a region plagued by famine, and you are facing starvation.

Or maybe you are like 15-year-old Bilan, and you were chased from your home by violence."

Lewis, K. (2019, September). I Live in a Refugee Camp. Scholastic Scope.

As you read Bilan's story, look at the photos and artwork included in this collection. These include all types of refugees from many locations and times in history. 

Choose one photo or document that speaks to you. Research it by looking at the "more info" tab. You may also conduct your own personal research. You can use the questions below to guide your research and thinking.

  • What was the primary reason these people were fleeing? 
  • What made them refugees?
  •  How does this particular document make you feel?  
  • How can you make connections between the experiences of the people in the documents and Bilan's experience?

Write a (minimum) one page essay in response to this collection and the story My Life as a Refugee. Share it with me via Office 365.

Amanda Dillard
12
 

Zoomorphic Creatures in Ancient Chinese Art

What can we learn about ancient China by studying artifacts?  What does the intricate detail of works of art suggest about values and beliefs in ancient China?  In this Learning Lab Collection, students will study ancient Chinese works of art via Project Zero Thinking Routines.  Working in groups, students will be assigned to either research ancient Chinese bronze bells or ancient Chinese bronze vessels and make inferences about ancient Chinese values and beliefs based on their research.  Then, inspired by taotie, mask-like design patterns of ancient Chinese bronze objects, students will etch their own zoomorphic creatures into metal foil.

This Learning Lab Collection contains a lesson plan, images to research, Thinking Routines, design worksheet, and sample final artwork.  Download the pdf Lesson Plan located in the "Teacher Materials and Lesson Plan" section first for instructions and art materials needed.

Tags:  metalwork; etch; repoussé; vessels; bells; ritual; Shang; Zhou; dynasty; China; composite animals

Freer and Sackler Galleries
45
 

Community Workers

Look at various community workers and read the book, The House that Jane Built, about Jane Addams who built a community center in Chicago, IL.

Linda Jaeger
25
 

Dogs

Different dogs and a story called The Night I Followed the Dog

Linda Jaeger
24
 

Eight Legged Fantastic!

I created this collection for families to do together while schools are closed. I will be making a collection a day while we are out of school. Today we will be exploring spiders. The idea is for families to look at the items in the collection and consider what they see in the objects and paintings, what they think, and what they wonder. Families can also watch a free Brainpop video about spiders and arachnids as well as listen to the read aloud Sophia's Masterpiece. Families can  watch science videos and read articles about spiders and scorpions. They can also explore art inspired by spiders and Spiderman the superhero. At the end of the collection I have provided a few ideas for families about what to do next.

If you want to learn more about more about See Think Wonder you can click here to see a video of a teacher using the routine in her classroom.

Ellen Rogers
58
 

Design Storytelling: Creating Narratives around Design Objects

Try something new with us. Selecting from the objects in this collection, pulled from current Cooper Hewitt exhibitions Contemporary Muslim Fashions and Willi Smith: Street Couture, craft a narrative, real (researched) or imagined. Think of it as a creative exercise using creatively-designed objects. 

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
25
 

Eight Legged Fantastic!

I created this collection for families to do together while schools are closed. I will be making a collection a day while we are out of school. Today we will be exploring spiders. The idea is for families to look at the items in the collection and consider what they see in the objects and paintings, what they think, and what they wonder. Families can also watch a free Brainpop video about spiders and arachnids as well as listen to the read aloud Sophia's Masterpiece. Families can  watch science videos and read articles about spiders and scorpions. They can also explore art inspired by spiders and Spiderman the superhero. At the end of the collection I have provided a few ideas for families about what to do next.

If you want to learn more about more about See Think Wonder you can click here to see a video of a teacher using the routine in her classroom.

rajeeva voleti
58
 

Exploring Multiple Perspectives with American Art

We started by doing a close reading of Walt Whitman's "I Hear America Singing," followed by an analysis of two paintings using Project Zero Thinking Routines:

  1. Iceman Crucified #4, by Ralph Fasanella, using See, Think, Wonder
  2. Braceros, by Domingo Ulloa, using Step In, Step Out, Step Back

Returning to the poem, consider how different people we identified in the two paintings might react to the poem. Next, choose two perspectives from any of the texts (written or visual) we've looked at, and use the Two Voice Poem template to compare their points of view on work in America.

Reflection Question: What do we gain by considering multiple perspectives on an issue?

This collection was created for the 2019 CATE annual convention in Burlingame, California. 

Phoebe Hillemann
6
 

Engaging Families through Art and Technology Programs: "Illuminating the Self"

This collection details an art and community engagement project that the Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access did with educators from the National Portrait Gallery and the Fairfax County Family Literacy Program. It includes assets and resources designed to help teachers, museum educators, and community-based informal learning educators recreate the program as is, or design their own, based on the specific needs of their classroom or learning community. 

"Illuminating the Self / Illuminándonos" was a five-day bilingual program in which pairs of immigrant mothers and their middle school-aged children worked together to learn about portraiture from the 2016 exhibition of the Outwin Boochever Portrait Competition winning portraits. First we talked about portraiture in general, and then focused the discussion on light and shadow. Next, students took photographic portraits of each other and chose one to recreate. We projected the photographs in black and white onto a wall, and had the students trace the outlines of their photographs on their blank drawing paper. They they worked with charcoals to fill in their portraits and refine their drawings. Participants also visited the Outwin exhibition. Finally, their portraits were displayed at the National Portrait Gallery's Hispanic Heritage Month Family Day.

Program surveys indicated improved literacy, technology, and communication skills to share heritage, traditions, and talents; increased sense of empowerment and self-esteem, strengthened parent-child relationships and community bonds, and creation of a core of mentors. One mother reported that before the program she would never have entered an art museum because she wouldn't have known what to do, but that now she would not be able to pass by without stopping in. As well, several family participants have returned to the Smithsonian asking to volunteer at future Smithsonian events.

This program received Federal support from the Latino Initiatives Pool, administered by the Smithsonian Latino Center.

#LatinoHAC

Philippa Rappoport
38
 

Art & Resistance 2: Black Women Subjects Free from the Gaze

Why art & resistance with Black women as subjects in a novel study of Beloved

  • This lesson may be used as a pre-reading and/ or during reading activity for a study of Toni Morrison's Beloved.  
  • The second of my eight quarter (2yr) literature course begins with the reading and critical interrogation of this Pulitzer Prize and American Book Award winning masterpiece.  
  • Since many learners carry the misperception that our world may be characterized as post-racial, they have a grossly limited view of how perceptions from so-called dominant groups may oppress racialized groups.  
  • This lesson/ collection is designed to help students construct meaning around the intersection of  Black women as creatives/ subjects in literature & art and the concept of the gaze (i.e. the white gaze in the literary canon).
  • For students who misperceive the small degree of diversity in the authors studied in their literature classes as post-racialism, it is important to acknowledge the space between where we presently are with respect where we aspire to be as prosumers of literature and art.
  • The impetus for continuing to center our literature study in resistance stems from out study of the works of Toni Morrison and her professional ethos that her "sovereignty & authority as a racialized person...be struck immediately" in her writing while  "...not  speak[ing] for Black people;...[but]..speak[ing] to and be[ing] among [black people]".  Her determination "to make sure that the white gaze was not the dominant one in any of [her] books" is an example of the importance and power of authentic creation.


#goglobal #andersonpetty #mgg #wissit2019 #tonimorrison #blackwomen

Sher Anderson Petty
54
 

Art & Resistance: Frederick Douglass

Why art & resistance in a novel study of The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass

  • This lesson may be used as a pre-reading activity for a study of the Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass.  My two year literature course begins junior year with the reading and interrogation of Douglass' Narrative.  
  • Students often have a limited view of the author, the historical context of 19th century America and especially the resistance against oppression and struggle for agency of racialized groups (like the kidnapped Africans who were stolen from their homes, trafficked and enslaved).  
  • This collection is designed to help students construct meaning around one of Douglass' many means of resistance to oppression by the careful curation of his image.

Why resistance?  

  • My rationale for centering our literature study on the concept of resistance was born from conversations with students last year that revealed their false beliefs that enslaved people (specifically the kidnapped and enslaved Africans trafficked and sold into the American Slave Trade) did not by and large resist.  There was large scale ignorance across all my classes of the scale of acts of resistance as well. 
  •  Additionally,I thought since my students are developmentally at a stage of differentiating themselves from their parents/ families (often looking like resistance to norms) that they would find relevance and resonance with a unit centered on resistance.

#goglobal #andersonpetty

Sher Anderson Petty
67
 

Photographer: Noggle, Anne

#nmahphc

This is a collection of four panorama photographs by photographer Anne Noggle made in the 1960s of a kitchen, a cafe lunch counter, a row of mailboxes, and a neighborhood street corner.  

Keywords: women, aging, panoramic photo, panorama photography, neighborhood, mailboxes


Anne Noggle was born in 1922 in Evanston, IL and spent her formative years living there with her mother and sister—two women who would become important characters in Noggle’s photography. 

Prior to her photography career, Noggle led a markedly different life.  In 1940, with her student pilot license in hand, Anne Noggle became a pilot and eventually a flight instructor as a Women’s Air Force Service Pilot (WASP) in World War II.  At the conclusion of the war, Anne taught flying, joined an aerial circus, and worked as a crop duster.  Art grabbed Noggle’s attention while she was on active duty in the air force in the late 1940s and early 1950s.  Stationed in Paris, she spent much of her free time at the Louvre.  Forced into early retirement due to emphysema caused by crop dusting, Noggle registered for college as an art history major at the University of New Mexico in 1959.  She was thirty-eight years old. 

Anne Noggle’s early photographs utilize the 35mm Panon camera.  Most of these 140° photographs are of an aging woman and her surroundings.  In Janice Zita Grover’s introduction to Silver Lining:  Photographs by Anne Noggle, she writes, about the panoramic format, that it is characteristic “to distort space in such a way that subjects distant from the lens appear flattened against deep space; between this effect and the necessity for reading the image side to side, the format gets as close as the still camera can to the implied narrative unfolding of a panoramic opening shot in a film . Noggle’s Panon images of her mother’s circle in Santa Fe have exactly these qualities, as if a newly landed observer…were scrutinizing these women, their curious rites and settings, for the first time.” 

By the early 1970s, however, Noggle moved on to wide-angle portraits featuring herself, her mother, sister, and her mother’s friends.  It is for these photographs that Noggle is most known.  Her interest in women and the aging process is exemplified by self-portraits of Noggle’s own face-lifts and images of her aging body. 

Noggle has been granted two NEA grants and a Guggenheim Fellowship.

Major holdings of Anne Noggle’s work can be found at:  the Northlight Gallery at Arizona State University, the Museum of Contemporary Photography, University of New Mexico—University Art Museum, and the Museum of New Mexico Photographic Archives.  In Washington, DC, American Art has one photograph from Noggle’s Agnes series of two women playing croquet.


NMAH Photographic History Collection
5
 

Photographer: Mather, Margarethe

#nmahphc

The Margarethe Mather NMAH Photographic History Collection consists of five platinum print photographs from the 1920s. Photographer Margrethe Mather was a model and source of inspiration for Edward Weston and an established pictorialist and a pioneering modernist in her own right.

For additional images, search collections.si.edu.

Keywords: women photographers, Pictorialism, platinum photography, palladium photography, Pierrot

NMAH Photographic History Collection
3
 

Photographer: Walker, Diana

#nmahphc

The Diana Walker collection at the NMAH Photographic History Department consists of 140 photographs reflecting her career as a photojournalist.  These include her tenure as a TIME Magazine photographer at the White House from 1984-2004, as well as other assignments.

Copyright Diana Walker.

For more images, search collections.si.edu.

Keywords: photojournalist, women photographers, First Ladies, FLOTUS, President of the United States, POTUS, Vice-President of the United States, VPOTUS, Secretary of State, Senator, campaign photography, reportage, portraiture, journalism, photographs of the military, laughing, heads of state

NMAH Photographic History Collection
80
 

CoPilotCulturallyLinquisticallyDiverseHistoryMakers

This collection was created to support an online class for elementary teachers focusing on culturally and linguistically diverse history makers.

Christy Howard
11
745-768 of 889 Collections