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Found 756 Collections

 

Textured Portraits

Students will analyze portraits for the message or expression communicated through portraits with exceptional texture. Contributing to a discussion with the 30 second look, students will look at an image from the 2016 Outwin exhibit to look deeper and explore and infer the artist's intent and interpret meaning. Students will utilize previously made photobooth self-portraits to begin exploration of Photoshop filters. Each student will create a new and originally produced textured portrait. Further extensions to analyze portraits include: conversation extender and contrast and compare. #NPGteach
Jennifer Fox
16
 

Musical Instruments Across Time

A collection of musical instruments that span a wide variety of origins, cultures, and materials.
Can you guess where each instrument came from, what period in time it's from, who used it, and what family of instruments it belongs to?
Linda Muller
40
 

Beginning of Year - Self-Portraits (Lincoln's Masks)

This is a beginning/end of the year self-portrait project created with first graders in mind. Students will create plaster masks to commemorate the start of first grade, that are filled, surrounded and suspended with items that represent who they are. In progress

#NPGteach
Tags: self-identity; community building; Art; family; National Portrait Gallery
Alicia Ronquillo
10
 

Harlem Renaissance: Langston Hughes and Jacob Lawrence

A compare/contrast of Langston Hughes and Jacob Lawrence, integral figures in the Harlem Renaissance. Created as part of the Learning to Look Summer Teaching Institute at the National Portrait Gallery.

#NPGteach
Inez Koberg
4
 

Symbolism, Story, and Art: Achelous & Hercules

A teacher's guide to the painting Achelous and Hercules, by Thomas Hart Benton. This 1947 mural retells an Ancient Greek myth in the context of the American Midwest. Includes the painting, a pdf of the myth "Achelous and Hercules," a website, and video discussions by curators and educators. The website includes an interactive exploring areas of interest on the piece, as well as lesson and activity ideas for the classroom.

Tags: greece
Tess Porter
6
 

Surrender at Appomattox

This is a lesson designed around the portrait "The Room in the McLean House, at Appomattox Court House, in which General Lee Surrendered to General Grant," and is intended to be used when teaching about General Lee's surrender. #npgteach
Jamie Grace
7
 

Paired Portraits

This lesson uses The "see, think, wonder" looking strategies to help students compare portraits on a field trip to the National Portrait Gallery. The lesson includes pre-museum visit activities, museum activities, and a follow up where students will create their own portraits.

This lesson was created in 2016 as part of the "Learning to Look" Teacher Workshop at the National Portrait Gallery. #npgteach
Kristin Enck
7
 

General Robert E. Lee's Surrender at Appomattox Courthouse

Students will observe and analyze the portrait "The Room in the McLean House, at Appomattox C.H., in which Gen. Lee surrendered to Gen. Grant" by Major & Knapp Lithography Co.
#npgteach
Jennifer McGough
6
 

Αλφαβητάρια

A collection of alphabet books to inspire students to create their own. Alphabet books can be created using any subject and completed with any grade. They can be completed individually (one student makes a page for each letter of the alphabet) or as a group or class (each student takes one letter). Here are some ideas for topics or use with your students:
Kindergarden-1st--Pick a letter, write a sentence using that letter and illustrate.
2nd-4th--The class takes a topic such as insects and each student takes a page, researches and illustrates it.
5th-12th--Students take a topic (biography, historical topic, memoir about themselves, book that they've read) and creates an alphabet book with each page telling the story or giving information about the subject.
Met Kous
13
 

Αρχαία παιχνίδια

My first collection of ancient games.
Ourania Doula
7
 

History of Video Games

A look at the factors that influenced video games and gaming.
John Di Maria
18
 

Writing Inspiration: Using Art to Spark Narrative Story Elements

The Smithsonian museum collection inspires many to research the history behind artifacts, but this collection explores the use of art and artifacts to spark creative story writing. Students will choose artifacts to craft characters, a setting, and a plot conflict to create and write a narrative story.

Targeted Vocabulary: Narrative, protagonist , antagonist, character, character traits, setting, plot, climax, and conflict.

After reading and analyzing several narrative stories for story elements such as character, setting, plot, climax, and conflict, students will use this collection to begin planning their own narrative stories.
Individuals or partners will first view the portraits and discuss possible stories behind each face before choosing a protagonist, antagonist, and supporting characters. They may begin to discuss and imagine character traits for each subject.
Next, the student will select a landscape setting in which the story may take place. The writer will describe the landscape, imagine a time period, and name the location.
Finally, the student will either choose an action artifact around which to build a major plot event, or have that slide as a minor scene in their story.
Students may use the Question Formulation Technique to garner ideas for background stories behind the faces. http://rightquestion.org/
Once the story elements are in place, the students may begin to draft narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, well-chosen details, and well-structured event sequences.

With the artifacts selected as the major story elements, the students may begin crafting their narrative story. The artifacts can then be displayed as illustrations in the published narratives.
Susan Stokley
66
 

Inventions: The washing machine

This collection follows the development of the washing machine through time.
Chris Campbell
7
 

Famous Faces: A collection of portraits by Irving Penn

Irving Penn was one of the most influential photographers of the 20th Century. Throughout a career that spanned 70 years, Penn captured images in black and white and color across various genres including advertising, fashion, still life, and portraits.
This Collection features portraits Penn took of famous people who built careers in the arts, an article written about Penn in The Smithsonian Magazine (November, 2015), and a link to the Irving Penn Archives at the Art Institute of Chicago where Penn donated the bulk of his collection in 1995.
IMPORTANT NOTE: Resources in the Irving Penn Archives collections at the Art Institute of Chicago include a series of nude photographs which may be inappropriate for minors to view.
Linda Muller
24
 

Child Labor in America

What would it have been like to be a child working during the period 1830-1930? Why did children have to go to work during this period in America's history?
Resources in this Collection includes paintings, photographs, text-based sources, and a video depicting children working in a variety of industries across America.
Linda Muller
23
 

Harlem Renaissance of the early 1900s

What historical, social, and cultural factors influenced the Harlem Renaissance?
Why did Harlem become the center of African-American arts during the 1920s and 1930s?
Linda Muller
20
 

Cat Collection

This is a fun collection of cats from the Smithsonian Institution along with a photo of my favorite kitty, Lucky.
Linda Muller
18
 

Libyan Rock Art

This collection contains images of rock-art of the Wadi al-Ajal, in the Fezzan region of south-west Libya. Several hundred engravings have so far been identified here. This rich concentration of rock-art spans the phase from at least 7 000 years ago until the present - a critical period of time which encompasses major transitions in human economy, culture and ideology from hunting and gathering to raising livestock, then to agriculture and more recently to industrialization. Rock-art provides fascinating evidence of how human groups were living during this period, what their relationships with their environment were and what they considered of importance and value. Because rock-art is deliberately placed at specific locations in the landscape, a powerful relationship can often exist between rock-art sites and natural landscape features.
Linda Muller
13
 

Frank Lloyd Wright

A collection of resources depicting some of the designs of famous American architect Frank Lloyd Wright.
Linda Muller
19
 

American Bald Eagle

How did the bald eagle become the symbol of America? What symbolism did Native Americans find in the bald eagle?
This Collection of resources on the American bald eagle includes images, videos, sculptures, and stamps that depict the American bald eagle.
Linda Muller
17
 

Sandwich Anyone?

The sandwich is arguably a mainstay of the American diet. This collection depicts a variety of sandwiches through drawings, photographs, sculpture, and advertisements. It is intended to be a fun exercise for students to experience by discussing the history and appeal of the sandwich using resources from the Smithsonian's collections.
Linda Muller
20
 

Objects of History

The dictionary defines an object as, "a thing you can see and touch: something that makes you feel a specific emotion." This is a collection of objects that represent moments throughout history. What event is behind each object? Who does the object belong to? Why is the object significant?

Suggested Activity: Teachers can copy and edit this collection, then add or remove specific resources. Build out this collection to ensure that it has enough resources so your students can work in pairs or small groups to analyze 2-3 sources.
Have student pairs/groups place each resource in its proper time and place then have the entire class work together to place all resources on a timeline. As each student pairs/groups place their resources on to the timeline, have them explain what they learned about each resource to the whole class.
Linda Muller
48
 

Salem Witch Trials

The witchcraft trials in Salem, Massachusetts, during the 1690s have been a blot on the history of America, a country which has since come to pride itself on the concepts of free speech and justice as well as on its religious principles. Guilt by association, unconfirmed testimony, judges blinded by their biases, and individuals determined to use the system of justice when no evidence of a crime existed. These kinds of social or political problems did not go away with the completion of those trials.
U.S. Senator Joseph R. McCarthy's relentless determination to find un-American citizens and communists in all areas of American life in the early 1950s prompted Arthur Miller to write The Crucible, a play about the Salem witch trials as an allegory to McCarthyism. The play no doubt prompted the House Committee on Un-American Activities in 1956 to subpoena Miller for questioning, but Miller refused to cooperate when asked to identify writers who had once been communists. Richard H. Rovere calls Miller, "the leading symbol of the militant, risk-taking conscience" of that time.

Learning Goals - student will:
Understand that in 17th Century New England, people were persecuted for allegedly practicing witchcraft.
Examine the allegations and offer alternatives to witchcraft that might explain people's behaviors.
Read and comprehend Arthur Miller's, "The Crucible" to make connections to and comment on 20th Century examples of people being persecuted for allegedly being Communists during the McCarthy Era of the 1950s.
Linda Muller
24
 

Clothing Across Cultures

This teaching collection was made to accompany the Cooper Hewitt Design Museum lesson plan "Saris, Kimonos, Togas & Smocks: Exploring Clothing Across Cultures." In addition to saris, kimonos, togas, and smocks, huipils and kanga are used as examples of culturally-specific clothing.

The lesson asks students to complete think about the cultural importance of clothing, and then to research a specific type of clothing and build a presentation around that research. Students might use this collection as a source for images for their presentation, to inspire research topics, or as a common basis for discussion with their peers.
Kate Harris
32
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