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Found 946 Collections

 

British tax revolution in America

During the Consumer Revolution in the mid 18th century, The British were one of our greatest ally as well as supplier for items such as tea, sugar, and paper. After the French and Indian War, which lasted seven years from 1753-1763, The British treasury was out of money. Therefore, to cover the expenses for the enormously expensive war, The British Government attempted to impose taxes on the colonist. As a result of the tax came the Stamp Act (1765), which was imposed on all American colonists and required them to pay tax on every piece of paper they used. It was the first direct tax that was implemented in America, which resulted in Northerns to go berserk. People began to riot, boycott and perform Charivari, as a response to the Stamp Act. Anyone who agreed with the Stamp Act would be targeted by the public, therefore, families had no choice but to boycott. However, imposing taxes upon the Northerns, not only was the beginning to one of the greatest revolutions in history, but also it made the northern community come together and stand up for themselves against the British to end the revolution of taxation in America. 

It didn't take too long until The Stamp Act was repealed. Nonetheless, it wasn't long until another act was passed to apply tax on items. The Townshend Act (1767) tried to increase prices for items only available in Britain. Americans reacted to that by boycotting, and making goods at home. Women found alternatives for tea and other items as a form of boycotting. British imports decreased significantly once Americans began to boycott their products. 


Ritesh Gautam
10
 

The World of Music

What would life be without music? Music is used throughout our everyday lives. Music was used for musicals, plays, films, TV shows with no words, like the show Tom and Jerry, and still is used now days for those same reasons and much more. Life without music is a life without color and a life without being able to express yourself. Music is found in every known culture, past and present, varying widely between times and places. It is a critical piece of individuals' way for living, as it creates a key part in religious customs, soul changing experiences (graduation and marriage), social exercises (dancing) and social activities.

Chalynn Wynn
10
 

The Valentine Dress

The Valentine Dress is the focus of a Visual Arts Lesson beginning with the Slow Look Strategy. This is followed with three ideas that may be incorporated into a high school fundamentals class. #npgteach

Vanessa Sales
11
 

Making, Not Taking, Photographs: Jazz Photos by Herman Leonard

Making, Not Taking, Photographs

Herman Leonard is credited with making the iconic photographs of jazz musicians. He captured images of the most famous jazz musicians of the 1940s, 1950s and 1960s -- Sarah Vaughan, Charlie Parker, Nat King Cole, Buddy Rich, Billie Holiday -- you name them, he photographed them. His pictures look like candids. Leonard captured a moment during a performance. But looks can be deceiving. Leonard, who practiced his photography skills on his own time and with his own money, made the photos we think of as "jazz photos." Most of the time he used two lights, because that's all he could afford, and set up the photos, even though they look like snapshots. #NPGteach

Jan Rubenstein
37
 

Origami Cranes: Activity and Background Information

People from all over the world have enjoyed doing traditional paper crafts for hundreds and sometimes thousands of years. In this set, you'll explore the tradition of the origami Japanese paper crane, a symbol of hope. A demonstration video is included for those who want to make their own crane. Appropriate for classroom, home, or informal education settings.

The Japanese word "origami" comes from two smaller words: "ori" which means "to fold," and "kami" meaning "paper." Although this is the most common word in the United States for the craft of paper folding, the tradition is known to have existed in China and Japan for more than a millennium, and from there it spread to other countries around the world. Japanese patterns tend to focus on animals and flowers, while Chinese designs are usually for things like boats and hats. Paper folding's earlier use was ceremonial, but with time the tradition became popular as a children's activity. 

Philippa Rappoport
8
 

Origami Animals: Demonstration Videos and Background Information

People from all over the world have enjoyed doing traditional paper crafts for hundreds and sometimes thousands of years. In this set, you'll find interviews with origami artists and a variety of demonstration videos to make paper animals (bull, butterfly, crane) and a paper wallet. Appropriate for classroom, home, or informal education settings.

The Japanese word "origami" comes from two smaller words: "ori" which means "to fold," and "kami" meaning "paper." Although this is the most common word in the United States for the craft of paper folding, the tradition is known to have existed in China and Japan for more than a millennium, and from there it spread to other countries around the world. Japanese patterns tend to focus on animals and flowers, while Chinese designs are usually for things like boats and hats. Paper folding's earlier use was ceremonial, but with time the tradition became popular as a children's activity.

Grab some paper and have fun!


Philippa Rappoport
5
 

John James Audubon

Collection of works created by or related to John James Audubon, naturalist and artist.

Pamela Curtin
16
 

Exploring Identity: How can portraiture conceal or reveal?

What is identity? How is it constructed? These activities investigate how portraits can conceal or reveal aspects of identity. How does the artist choose to portray an individual? How does the sitter choose to be shown?

This collection includes a three-part activity that can be modified by choosing to spend more or less time sharing out as a group. It begins with a discussion about identity, using the Chalk Talk Thinking Routine and a comparison of two portraits to further push students' thinking on how portraiture can both conceal and reveal aspects of identity. In the next parts of the activity, students are able to choose from a variety of portraits for individual reflection and then come together as a group to discuss a larger work to about culture and identity. Several Project Zero Thinking Routines can be used to stimulate and record thinking. 


Part I: Chalk Talk and comparing portraits

Students participate in the Chalk Talk Thinking Routine using the questions provided. A quick gallery walk where students circulate and read all responses can allow the class to get a feel for the many (or singular) perspective(s) of identity. Using the See-Think-Wonder Thinking Routine, students compare and contrast two portraits: LL Cool J by Kehinde Wiley and John D. Rockefeller by John Singer Sargent. Students can share with a neighbor and then out to the larger group or simply share out as a large group depending on class size, etc. 

 

Part II: Portraiture and Identity

Using the Individual Exploration of Portraiture worksheet, students can choose one image from the fifteen provided and spend some time exploring their selected portrait. Students can be given 5-10 minutes to interact with their chosen image. Using one of Roger Shimomura’s portraits, students will use the Unveiling Stories Thinking Routine to better understand the many layers to this work of art. Again, students can share out in pairs first or simply share out to the whole group depending on class size, etc.

 

Part III: Returning to chosen portrait and final reflection

Students will once again return to their selected portrait and complete the "second look" section of the Individual Exploration of Portraiture worksheet. A final reflection about identity and portraiture can be completed either as a group or individually using the I Used to think…; But Now I Think… Thinking Routine.

#NPGteach

Emily Veres
23
 

The Great Debate: Portraiture and Primary Sources

This collection is created in conjunction with a professional development workshop facilitated by the National Portrait Gallery and Teaching with Primary Sources Northern Virginia (TPSNVA is funded by a grant from the Library of Congress). 

Have you ever wondered if a portrait is a primary source? In this workshop, we will examine portraits from the Portrait Gallery, along with primary sources from the Library of Congress, to consider this question and explore connections between the two distinct collections. Participants will brainstorm and come up with strategies to incorporate these rich resources into their English and social studies curriculum.  

#NPGteach

Briana White
66
 

Conflict and Compromise: The Vietnam War

This collection brings together EDSITEment and Smithsonian resources to support the initial research into a project for National History Day 2018, "Conflict and Compromise in History."

These resources - including protest posters, archival photographs, interviews, artwork, and articles - explore the topic of the Vietnam War from multiple perspectives. Resources highlight politics, the experience of soldiers, anti-war protests, and artwork created in reaction to the Vietnam War. The second tile of this collection contains questions to help with both the analysis of this historical event and the analysis of different types of resources (photograph, document, artwork, portrait, and object). The third tile contains a graphic organizer, created by National History Day, to help explore historical context and the "Conflict and Compromise in History" theme.

By no means is this collection comprehensive; instead, it provides a launching point for further research.

This collection was created in collaboration with EDSITEment, a website for K-12 educators from the National Endowment for the Humanities.

Share your National History Day collections and let us know what you think! Write to us on Twitter: @EDSITEment & @SmithsonianLab, #NHD2018. If you publish a collection on your National History Day topic, be sure to enter #NHD2018 in the description!

Tags: ho chi-minh; lyndon b. johnson; richard nixon; walter cronkite; henry kissinger; veteran; oral history; viet cong; protest; peace; 50s; 60s; 70s; 20th century; 1900s; national endowment for the humanities; nhd; #NHD

Susan Ogilvie
84
 

Harlem Renaissance

This collection helps guide students as they learn about the Harlem Renaissance. There are 3 steps to the lesson:

  1. As a class, students use the "see, think, wonder" visual thinking routine to analyze a painting.
  2. Students watch a video and answer questions about the Harlem Renaissance.
  3. Students individually analyze 6 examples of art from the Harlem Renaissance, including paintings, music, and poetry and connect each piece to the historical context.

Michelle Moses
9
 

Civil Rights Movement

Susan Ogilvie
23
 

Access Series: Nostalgic Popular "Pop" Culture 1950s-2000s

This inspiration collection of nostalgic popular "pop" culture from the 1950s, 1960s, 1970s, 1980s, 1990s and 2000s—super heroes and super villains, Muppets, cartoon characters, Star Wars, Disney and Pixar characters, Transformers, and movies was used for a collage activity and discussion prompt in an informal learning activity, "Me & My World: Personal Ecology/Interest Inventory" with a group of teens with cognitive and intellectual disabilities. Students were asked about their favorite pop culture influences from the past and present. Use the visible thinking routine, "See|Think|Wonder" as a starting point for a discussion prompt, and the images for inspiration.

Tags: decision-making, self-determination, student empowerment, disability, All Access Digital Arts Program

Susan Ogilvie
97
 

The 1960s--A Decade Collection

This is a topical collection about American life and politics in the 1960s. Resources in this collection might be helpful to students and teachers working on projects about the decade. It is not meant to be completely comprehensive, but rather includes highlights of the Smithsonian's collection spanning art, popular culture, social trends, leadership, and technology.

Teachers and students might copy and adapt this collection to suit their needs; highlighting a specific aspect of life in the 1960s and adding annotations and additional resources.

tags: Sixties, Kennedy, Camelot, civil rights, Vietnam, politics, decade

Susan Ogilvie
97
 

Expressive Self Portrait

Art 3 students will compare the elements and principles in each image and distinguish their aesthetic qualities of expression. 

Jinni Copp
15
 

The Art of West Virginia

Art and photography of the Mountain State
Pamela Curtin
45
 

The Pride of a Pitcher: Pedro Martinez

How do we represent our roots artistically? What can a portrait tell us about the sense of identity of the subject? Focusing on a famous athlete from the Dominican Republic, students will explore the personal history of the pitcher, Pedro Martínez, and how his cultural pride is portrayed on canvas. Class members will read a recent biography of Martínez before examining his portrait, Pride and Determination, currently on exhibition in Twentieth-Century Americans: 1990 to Present. #NPGteach

Patrick Bonner
7
 

Byron Miller's Special Shirts- Institute of Texan Cultures- The Will to Adorn

Mr. Byron Miller orders fabric from Africa and has the shirts tailored to a version of the Guayabera shirt. He talked about his style evolution from being influenced by the Presidential shirt style made popular by Nelson Mandela but then combining it with the Guayabera style. As far as he knows, he is the only person with this style of shirts.

The Will to Adorn: African American Dress and the Aesthetics of Identity is a collaborative initiative with Smithsonian Affiliations, the Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage, and the Smithsonian Learning Lab.

Through the internship, students explored expression in the African American community in San Antonio by engaging with local experts.

Will to Adorn 2017

Will To Adorn San Antonio
16
 

Barber Shops and Braiding Studios- Insitute of Texan Cultures- The Will to Adorn

Students visited Faided Image Barbershop, Kady's African Braiding and Weaving, and Talk A Da Town Barbershop to better understand  the roles that barber shops and salons have in the African American community in San Antonio.

The Will to Adorn: African American Dress and the Aesthetics of Identity is a collaborative initiative with Smithsonian Affiliations, the Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage, and the Smithsonian Learning Lab.

Through the internship, students explored expression in the African American community in San Antonio by visiting barber shops, and an African American braiding salon.

Will to Adorn 2017

Will To Adorn San Antonio
21
 

Sneakerhead Culture- Institute of Texan Cultures- The Will to Adorn

Sneakers and the marketing to sell them have changed over the years. Adidas and converse used to be advertised to the white, country club, tennis population until the marketing companies realized the buying power of the African American population. Once Run DMC started wearing Adidas and sports became so popular, the whole marketing campaign shifted to target the young, African American population. Sneakers have become a cultural trend within the African American population embraced by rappers, athletes and the every day population.

The Will to Adorn: African American Dress and the Aesthetics of Identity is a collaborative initiative with Smithsonian Affiliations, the Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage, and the Smithsonian Learning Lab.

Through the internship, students explored expression in the African American community in San Antonio by engaging with local experts.

Will to Adorn 2017



Will to Adorn San Antonio-Fall Internship
21
 

Head Wraps- Institute of Texan Cultures- The Will to Adorn

Head wraps give connections to our heritage and have a big influence in African American culture. Head wraps give a sense of cultural identity and shows  beauty and pride.

The Will to Adorn: African American Dress and the Aesthetics of Identity is a collaborative initiative with Smithsonian Affiliations, the Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage, and the Smithsonian Learning Lab.

Through the internship, students explored expression in the African American community in San Antonio by engaging with local experts.

Will to Adorn 2017

Will to Adorn San Antonio-Fall Internship
29
 

Express Yourself: Creating a Visual Journal with the Portrait Gallery

This collection was created in conjunction with a professional development workshop for teachers held at the National Portrait Gallery in 2017.

How can journaling transform the way your students experience museums and individual artworks? Sean Murphy, the art teacher at Samuel Tucker Elementary School in Alexandria, VA and the Portrait Gallery teamed up to introduce ways of incorporate journaling into your classroom. Participants explored the metacognitive benefits of using art journals in both the classroom and the museum. This workshop included both gallery and studio experiences. 

#NPGteach

Gayle Kraus
15
 

DuSable Museum of African American History - Will To Adorn

In 2017 teens from the DuSable Museum of African American History explored the city of Chicago to document the impact of segregation on African American style in across the city.  This is the final exhibition of their findings. 


This Will To Adorn project is a collaboration between the Smithsonian Institute, the Smithsonian Center for Folklife & Cultural Heritage, and the DuSable Museum of African American History.  


Tags: culture, style, youth, chicago, segregation, Will To Adorn 2017, DuSable

DuSableMuseum
40
 

Express Yourself: Creating a Visual Journal with the Portrait Gallery

This collection was created in conjunction with a professional development workshop for teachers held at the National Portrait Gallery in 2017.

How can journaling transform the way your students experience museums and individual artworks? Sean Murphy, the art teacher at Samuel Tucker Elementary School in Alexandria, VA and the Portrait Gallery teamed up to introduce ways of incorporate journaling into your classroom. Participants explored the metacognitive benefits of using art journals in both the classroom and the museum. This workshop included both gallery and studio experiences. 

#NPGteach

Briana White
15
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