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Found 7,569 Resources

kit, first aid

National Museum of American History

jug

National Museum of American History

jar

National Museum of American History

ice pack

National Museum of American History

glass, martini

National Museum of American History

gauze sponges

National Museum of American History

forceps

National Museum of American History

forceps

National Museum of American History

certified proof

National Museum of American History

certified proof

National Museum of American History

certified proof

National Museum of American History

card

National Museum of American History

card

National Museum of American History

bandage

National Museum of American History

bandage

National Museum of American History

[Unidentified Sauk and Fox man]

National Anthropological Archives

[Translation of Fox text]

National Anthropological Archives
Published in BAE 40th Annual Report, Page 108 (line 30 to 43)

[Translation of Fox text]

National Anthropological Archives
Published in BAE 40th Annual Report, Page 183 (line 8 to 25)

[Painting of Ma'katawimesheka'kaa or Black Hawk, a subordinate chief]

National Anthropological Archives
Born 1767. Died 1838.

Original painting by C.B. King (1837). Published in Albert Brett "Great Indian Chiefs" and Octavo edition of McKenney and Hall.

[Painting of Kai-pol-e-qua, a Sauk brave]

National Anthropological Archives
Original painting by C.B. King (1824). Published in McKenney and Hall, 1933 ed.

[Ormond]

National Museum of American History
A black and white print of a standing race horse with a jockey.

Ormond was an English racer foaled on 18 March, 1883 by the 1st Duke of Westminster at Eaton Stud in Cheshire. His sire was Bend Or and his dam was Lily Agnes. Ormond’s training was delayed because he had to undergo treatment for knee troubles in 1884 and 1885. John Porter took over Ormond’s training, but he did not race until October of 1885 when he won the Post Sweepstakes at Newmarket. Ormonde’s jockeys alternated between Fred Archer and George Barrett when he was a contender for the English Triple Crow in 1886. Barrett road the horse to victory in the 2,000 Guineas, followed by Archer in the Epsom Derby and the St. Leger Stakes. Ormond won every race and became the fourth winner of the English Triple Crown. At the end of his racing career in 1887, Ormond had won all 16 starts and gathered 28,465 pounds of prize money. He was often labeled the “horse of the century.” Ormond was moved to the Duke’s stud farm in 1888 where he produced but faced reduced fertility due to an illness. One of his offspring, Flying Fox, also went on to win the Triple Crown. Ormond died in 1904 at age 21 in Santa Rosa, California. His skeleton and skull were given to the Natural History Museum in South Kensington, London.

[Fox text]

National Anthropological Archives
Published in BAE 40th Annual Report, Page 182 (line 14 to 25)

[Fox text]

National Anthropological Archives
Published in BAE 40th Annual Report, Page 109
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