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Forest Service, Culture and Community

Smithsonian Education
In this session, Smithsonian curator and oral historian discusses the occupational culture of the U.S. Forest Service. He will draw on his experience of working with the U.S. Forest Service for a Smithsonian Folklife Festival program in 2005 and also working for the Forest Service as a seasonal naturalist in Alaska. Presented by: James Deutsch, Curator and Editor, Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage Original Airdate: September 21, 2011 You can stay connected with the Smithsonian's upcoming online events and view a full collection of past sessions on a variety of topics.: http://www.smithsonianeducation.org/educators/events/online_events.html

Kansas City State Community College

National Museum of American History

Community Narratives: Citizens Recording History

Smithsonian Education
This session shows you how to identify a great interview subject, how to prepare for the interview, and what to do during the interview to make sure you capture great material. Join this session to experience the importance of looking for narratives and cultural histories close to home. Presented by: James Deutsch, Curator and Editor, Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage Alex Griswold, Executive Producer, Science Media Group, Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory Joshua Bell, Curator of Globalization, National Museum of Natural History Original Airdate: July 13, 2011 You can stay connected with the Smithsonian's upcoming online events and view a full collection of past sessions on a variety of topics.: http://www.smithsonianeducation.org/educators/events/online_events.html With support from Microsoft Partners in Learning.

Creating a Hunger-Free Community

National Museum of American History

Sheffield Road Upgrade: Community Mapping

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum

Two-Headed Monster Destroys Community

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
Two-headed skeleton in black with Heroin and Real Estate printed on heads

Support Your Community War Fund

National Museum of American History

Community Cooker (Jiko ya jamii)

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum

Dudley Neighbors Community Land Trust

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum

Architectural History of the Anacostia Community Museum, 1985

Smithsonian Archives - History Div
Ewing, H., & Ballard, A. (2009). A guide to Smithsonian architecture. Washington, D.C.: Smithsonian Books.

The Anacostia Neighborhood Museum was first conceived by Secretary S. Dillon Ripley as a way to reach underserved communities outside of the National Mall. The museum was first opened in the renovated Carver Theater (built in 1948) in 1967. The museum proved to be immensely popular and soon outgrew the space.

Ground breaking for the new museum took place in May, 1985. Designed by the Washington architecture firm Keyes Condon Florance, this 28,000 square foot museum is considered to be cultural expressionist style architecture.

The museum opened in 1989, and in 1995 was renamed Anacostia Museum and Center for African American History and Culture, and served as a planning site for the new Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture. In 2002 it undertook an extensive renovation. The renovation, led by architecture firms architrave p.c. and Wisnewski Blair, was sought to maximize the space of the museum, but also to add elements to the building that express the history and culture of African Americans. Elements that were added include the red brick facade that invokes a woven Kente cloth, and the glass, block, and blue tile inlaid concrete cylinders that are reminiscent of the ruins of Great Zimbabwe. In 2006 the museum was renamed the Anacostia Community Museum.

The Community In Services

National Museum of African American History and Culture
A black-and-white photograph of men in kippot and tallitot sitting in the foreground while women in white robes and headscarves stand and sit behind them. The photograph is signed by the photographer in the bottom right corner.

Anacostia Park Community Day

National Museum of African American History and Culture
A black and white photo of a crowd of people at the Anacostia Park Community Day. The majority of people in this photo appear to be teens or young adults. There are several people in the photo who are wearing baseball caps. Most of the people in the back half of the photo are out of focus. There are four (4) people near the front of the crowd who are holding boom boxes over their heads. There is also one other in the background in the center of the image.

There is a white border around the image.

There are no inscriptions, front or back.

The Great Airplane Strike; In My Community

National Museum of American History
Paul Revere and The Raiders. side 1: The Great Airplane Strike; side 2: In My Community (Columbia 4-43810)

45 rpm. Accessioned with original printedsleeve.

Growing to a Community of Volunpeers: Communication & Discovery

Smithsonian Institution Archives
Meghan Ferriter, Project Coordinator, Smithsonian Transcription Center

In just over a year, the Smithsonian Transcription Center has grown in size, scope, and participation. Every day, members of the volunteer community visit the Transcription Center to split projects into tasks and share their discoveries with us.

We have 956 active contributors on the site and we’ve completed over 13,412 pages, from 18,494 available pages. Over 450 volunteers have worked on the 46 different Archives projects; there are over 75 other projects in the Transcription Center. Volunteers made connections between Smithsonian collections, to other cultural heritage institutions, and opened doors to discovery while transcribing. Through daily work and targeted campaigns, our volunteers have moved from individuals to a community of “volunpeers” – taking pride in the ways they’re learning with us in this pan-Smithsonian project. 

As we opened to the public last summer, we knew volunpeers would have to “work together,” yet we didn’t know what that would look like. What we've discovered are the ways that they use the features of the site and other tools to interact - indirectly and directly. 

So, how do volunteers get integrated into the community? Typically by transcribing! From the homepage, there are 3 ways to jump into projects: from the main carousel "Featured Projects," from the dropdown "Projects menu," and in the "Latest Updates" section. Some volunpeers tell us that they check the "Latest Updates" section to see what others are working on - then they'll join a project that looks like it needs help (or looks interesting). Volunpeers also explain how they return to projects using the browse by Museums & Archives feature to check on their progress.

Getting started on the Homepage, Smithsonian Transcription Center

Many volunteers use the Notes feature we implemented on all projects in the Transcription Center this spring. This box under the transcription field allows them to communicate with the Smithsonian staff sharing the project and also share or discuss information with other volunpeers. For example, in the recently posted Lepidoptera notes project:

Communicating by Notes, Smithsonian Transcription Center

Here’s some insight into collaboration on a project: There are 34 completed Archives projects in the Transcription Center, with an average size of 83 pages and 25 contributing volunpeers each. When you enter a project page, you can see the status of each page and, by hovering over the thumbnails, how many people have worked on each page. 

Volunpeers and Contributions Per Page, Smithsonian Transcription Center

Let’s look at a completed project: Botanist Ellsworth Paine Killip’s field notes from Colombia (1944). This Archives (and Field Book Project) project is 59 pages and was completely transcribed and reviewed by 12 volunpeers. We can see collaboration on a microscale by looking at the number of members and contributions it took to finish a page. For Killip’s field notes, that was an average of 4 volunpeers and 12 contributions per page. That suggests that peer review is a process that can inform reliable results in the Transcription Center. 

The excitement of releasing a new project continues as volunpeers start reporting discoveries via tweets, Facebook wall posts, and feedback e-mails. Using Twitter and Facebook, volunpeers will ask other #volunpeers for help and share what they’ve discovered. They also invite other interested parties to join the transcribing adventure.

We find that allowing people to communicate using tools they already use facilitates better collaboration. We are able to respond to questions and discoveries via social media; or highlight complicated pages, or share praise for completed projects, allowing us to communicate more widely with our community. If you transcribe with us, we'd love to know whether you find this helpful and how we can do it better (get in touch!).

The adventure continues! As new projects are added almost every week, you can join other volunpeers while you choose-your-own-adventure. Tell us more about your experiences with transcribing – follow and tweet @SmithsonianArch and @TranscribeSI on Twitter or drop us a note

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Flier for the Black Community Survival Conference

National Museum of African American History and Culture
Double-sided poster or flier advertising the 1972 Black Community Survival Conference with promotion provided by the Black Panther Party's Angela Davis People's Free Food Program. Printed in black and red on white paper. Each side features black & white photographs, black & red text and has [10,000 FREE BAGS OF / GROCERIES / (WITH CHICKENS / IN EVERY BAG)] at the top. One side features photographs of Angela Davis, Bobby Seale, Ron Dellums, and Ericka Huggins. It includes a list of conference speakers and a blank registration form. The other side features images of Ira Simmons, D'Army Bailey, Julian Bond, Rev. Charles Koen, Father Earl Neil, and The Persuasions (three images). Also pictured is a woman administering a medical test to two young boys next to the text [10,000 FREE / SICKLE CELL / ANEMIA TESTS / TO BE GIVEN / AT CONFERENCE].

Dr. Richard Mudd lectures at the Anacostia Neighborhood [Community] Museum

Anacostia Community Museums Collections and Research
[Begins at 00:37] Meeting of the Anacostia Historical Society at the Anacostia Neighborhood Museum. 3 October 1975. See also: http://siris-archives.si.edu/ipac20/ipac.jsp?&profile=all&source=~!siarchives&uri=full=3100001~!322848~!0#focus Courtesy of the Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Anacostia Museum History Series, AV000785.

Bergrish Lecture Hall, Bronx Community College

Archives of American Art
Diagram : 1 sheet : ill. ; 13 x 19 cm.

Bergrish Lecture Hall, Bronx Community College, built in 1964 was originally part of New York University.

Bergrish Lecture Hall, Bronx Community College

Archives of American Art
1 photographic print : b&w

Bergrish Lecture Hall, Bronx Community College, built in 1964 was originally part of New York University.

Bergrish Lecture Hall, Bronx Community College

Archives of American Art
1 photographic print : b&w

Bergrish Lecture Hall, Bronx Community College, built in 1964 was originally part of New York University.

Case Study: Community Upgrading in Bangkok, Thailand

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
This discussion is centered on Thailand's Baan Mankong Community Upgrading Project, a particularly successful example of housing improvement, land-tenure security, and infrastructure development that places slum communities at the center of the upgrading process.

Scenery from an unidentified Gullah community

Anacostia Community Museum Archives
Lorenzo Dow Turner took this image while doing research in the Sea Islands off the coast of South Carolina and Georgia between 1931 and 1933.

Luce Unplugged Community Showcase with America Hearts

Smithsonian American Art Museum
Video from a special Luce Unplugged Community Showcase on May 31, 2013. Visitors enjoyed sets by local bands America Hearts, Lyriciss, and More Humans, selected with the help of City Paper's managing editor, Jonathan L. Fischer.

Luce Unplugged Community Showcase with Pleasure Curses

Smithsonian American Art Museum
Video from the Luce Unplugged Community Showcase on May 22, 2015. Visitors enjoyed sets by local bands Pleasure Curses and Young Rapids, which were selected with the help of the Washington City Paper. Presented with Washington City Paper. #LuceUnplugged || http://americanart.si.edu/luce/unplugged
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