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Found 6,952 Collections

 

"The Tempest" - Launching the play (See/Mood/Thematic ideas thinking routine) #SAAMteach

1. Divide students into small groups (2 or 3 works for me)

2. Assign each student a painting - - send them the link, and they access it through their own computer so that they are able to zoom in if they would like a closer look at a particular feature.

3. Ask students to complete the following thinking routine:

a. See - - an objective list of what they "see"

b. Mood - - ideas as to what mood or emotions these particular qualities or items evoke.

c. Theme - - broad ideas as to a potential theme/larger idea expressed by the work.

3. After completing this thinking routine within their small groups, the students take turns projecting their painting on the smart board and sharing their discussion highlights with their classmates. We start to make a random list (like a "Wordle" forming) on the board of these "theme" ideas."

4. By the time we finish with the last painting/photograph/work of art - - we have a "Wordle" on the board that somewhat represents or hints at many of the thematic ideas expressed in "The Tempest."

5. I then complete a standard PowerPoint introduction to the play, but noting the similarities between many of their ideas expressed through their interpretations of the works of art, and Shakespeare's larger ideas as presented in "The Tempest."

Annette Spahr
8
 

"The Tempest" - Wrap Up Assignment (#SAAMTeach)

This lesson is used after students have finished reading William Shakespeare's "The Tempest."

1. I print each of the paintings in this collection (most uploaded from The Folger Shakespeare Library's Digital Collection), and then post them across the board, around the room to create a "Gallery Walk" environment.

2. I remind students, before they begin, that the keyword in this play is "art." Just as it is Prospero's "art" to control Ariel and Caliban through magic and bring his abusers to the island, so it is the dramatist's art to create an enchanted island on a simple wooden stage. I share with them that artists have been, in turn, then inspired by what has appeared on the stage during productions of "The Tempest," for centuries. The various works of art posted around them span from the 1700's through the 20th Century.

3. Students are asked to walk through the gallery, and select one painting, one artistic interpretation of "The Tempest" that speaks to them, appeals to them, for any reason. Conversely, they should pick one they believe, for them personally, misses the mark as far as how they would interpret or envision this character, this scene, this play in general. They are to mark their names - - only their names - - on the board under the paintings.

4. When finished, we have then have a discussion about their choices - it's quite free wheeling - - no wrong answers here - - wonderful sharing of ideas. Many of the ideas and conversations I subtly steer to reflect some of the questions they will address in the wrap up writing assignment that follows.

5. When our conversations have finished, and after we've heard from everyone about their various interpretations, I give them the wrap up writing assignment. There are five individual response questions, with students being asked to write responses ranging anywhere from 175-200 words for each question. Three out of the five questions require them to return to this SAAM Learning Lab collection in order to write their responses, one other question is a classic literary analysis (thematic) question, while the last one is a historical context question. 

(I've attached the prompts as a resource.)

Note: This assignment went over far better than I expected and I look forward to recreating it/adapting it for other units.

Annette Spahr
15
 

"The Things They Carried," by Tim O'Brien

This collection reflects the works of art included in the Smithsonian American Art Museum's exhibit: “Artists Respond: American Art and the Vietnam War, 1965-1975."    #SAAMTeach

Annette Spahr
24
 

"The World of Your Senses": Parallel Perspectives from Tibetan Buddhism and Western Science on Sensory Perception

"The World of Your Senses" shares parallel perspectives from Tibetan Buddhism and western science on sensory perception. This collection explores the questions: How do we see? How does hearing work? How do we perceive smell? How does taste function? How do we sense touch? In addition, the Buddhist perspective includes a sixth sense... mind consciousness!

"The World of Your Senses" is the result of many years of work growing out of directives from His Holiness the Dalai Lama and his long history engaging Western scientists in dialogue. The script, content, and imagery were envisioned by a dedicated and curiosity-filled group of thirty Tibetan Buddhist monastics-in-exile from monasteries and nunneries in India, through the "Science for Monks and Nuns" program. The creation of the physical exhibit, launched in 2010, was supported through a unique collaboration between the Library of Tibetan Works and Archives (LWTA in Dharamsala, India), the Sager Family Foundation, the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D.C. (SCEMS/SCLDA & OEC/Smithsonian Exhibitions), and the Exploratorium in San Francisco. It has since traveled to the United States, Nepal, and Bhutan.

The resource is bi-lingual: English and Tibetan.

RELATED COLLECTIONS:

Senses Series – Sight in Humans and Animals      (http://learninglab.si.edu/q/ll-c/n2f39XxkfBRJeHPk)

Senses Series – Hearing      (http://learninglab.si.edu/q/ll-c/7EbVTM49NgWiGrzA)

Senses Series – Smell      (http://learninglab.si.edu/q/ll-c/7LjjBHybUk9HE8Wj)

Senses Series – Taste     (http://learninglab.si.edu/q/ll-c/2w7r7PVoAgghiYmL)

Senses Series – Touch     (http://learninglab.si.edu/q/ll-c/oon5rHojeyrEwNEE)


This collection is based Science For Monks, World of Your Senses (2010).

Tracie Spinale
28
 

"Their Stories: Lowell's Youth and the Refugee Experience"

This exhibit at Lowell National Historical Park, Lowell, Massachusetts, features the stories of five refugees who came to Lowell as teenagers. As they established new lives here, they tried to maintain their cultural heritage while building a sense of belonging in the United States. Read their stories and hear, in their own words, why they left their home countries, their experiences as refugees, and how they are adapting to life in Lowell.  

#TCSLowell #APA2018

Tsongas Industrial History Center
8
 

"Think Different": Steve Jobs

What does it mean to be influenced by the world around you? This collection looks at the technical innovations, design influences (Japanese Zen Buddhist, Italian, Bauhaus); location influences (Yosemite, Silicon Valley); and cultural and musical influences (Bob Dylan, Edwin Land) which inspired Steve Jobs to "think different" and create digital products which changed the world.

Keywords: inventor, biography, technology, innovation

Tracie Spinale
46
 

"Votes for Women!" A Comparative Look at British and US Suffrage Movements

The resources in this collection provide a comparative look into the similarities and differences of the Suffrage Movements in both the UK and the US. 

Emily Surman
19
 

"Water Matters" Online Conference Series: Archive and Illustration Summaries

This online conference series invites educators and students to take an active role in global environmental issues around water. Learn from experts in the field, share ideas, and collaborate with people around the world who, like you, are committed to solving environmental challenges. Includes illustration summaries and the archive of each session, with interdisciplinary connections to water issues . Original Airdates: Spring 2012
Ashley Naranjo
42
 

"We Didn't Start The Fire": World Headlines, 1949-1989

"We Didn't Start the Fire" is a song by Billy Joel. Its lyrics include brief, rapid-fire allusions to more than 100 headline events between 1949, the year of Joel's birth, and 1989, when the song was released. This topical collection and image gallery represents references in the song. What makes these events headlines? What events does Joel leave out? How do these resources reflect the headlines, ideas, and concerns addressed by Joel? 

sheishistoric
99
 

"We the People": Flash Card Activity and Template

This collection includes a variety of resources on the theme, "We the People," a template document  for teachers to create their own  flashcard activity with Learning Lab images, and strategies to use them.

This collection was created for the 2018 cohort of the Smithsonian-Montgomery College Faculty Fellowship Program on the theme, "We the People: America's Grand and Radical Experiment with Democracy." But anyone can use it.

Strategies: Begin by selecting your own set of images. (Feel free to copy this collection and then adapt as you like.) When creating your flashcards, use the template from the last learning tile, and add relevant text diagonally below the object. Print double-sided flipping on the SHORT side.

After distributing the cards, have students select one or two that speak to them. Then have them discuss the following questions in groups and share out.

Supporting Questions:
What themes do you see?
Do you see these themes across the objects and over time?

Essential Questions:
Using these images, define American Democracy.
What other resources might you use to tell a fuller story?


Keywords: #MCteach


Philippa Rappoport
50
 

"What is Feminist Art?"

Responses to the questionnaire, "What is Feminist Art?" from 1976 and 2019.

Sarah Archino
63
 

"what is feminist art?" 1976 responses

Responses from the 1976 questionnaire "What is Feminist Art," as included in a 2019 exhibition of the same name.

Sarah Archino
24
 

"what is feminist art?" 2019 responses

Responses from the 2019 questionnaire "What is Feminist Art," as included in a 2019 exhibition of the same name.

Sarah Archino
39
 

"What makes someone a Hero?"

This is a collection of heroes / leaders in a variety of areas to help define the notion of "What is a Hero?"

randiseli
21
 

"Women's Work"

This collection explores the conception of "women's work" and challenges users to think about whether such a phrase has meaning.

Teachers and students can use the collection in a number of ways: grouping or sorting the resources chronologically to explore change over time; writing definitions of "women's work" for different time periods; completing image or text analysis on individual resources; or researching women's contributions in a particular field.

This is a work-in-progress based on the digitized materials within the Smithsonian Learning Lab's collection--it is not meant to be wholly definitive or authoritative. In fact, this could be a point of discussion: what, or who, do you think is missing from this collection?

Kate Harris
35
 

"Words can lie or clarify" by Aiko Herzig-Yoshinaga

In 1981, Aiko Herzig-Yoshinaga submitted a memorandum on the subject “Use of term ‘concentration camps’” to the executive director of the Commission on Wartime Relocation and Internment of Civilians (CWRIC). Included in this collection is background information on the Japanese American Incarceration era and Executive Order 9066, alongside Herzig-Yoshinaga's own words. In response to reading through this memorandum, students can apply Project Zero Thinking Routines to what they already know about the Japanese American Incarceration era and what interests them for further research. Additionally, students can begin to connect ideas from Herzig-Yoshinaga's memorandum to artifacts, documents and photographs of the era, noting especially the nuances in the meaning of words used and interpret some of these euphemisms in context.

#APA2018

Related collection of interest around language found within the Civilian Exclusion Order: Document Analysis: Civilian Exclusion Order and Japanese American Incarceration During WWII

Ashley Naranjo
50
 

"¡Pleibol!”: Close Looking to Explore One Family’s Story of Latino Baseball

This teaching collection helps students to look closely and think critically by using three Thinking Routines to explore the cultural relevance of one family's baseball-related objects from an exhibition at the National Museum of American History, "¡Pleibol!: In the Barrios and the Big Leagues." The exhibition seeks to document the history of Latino culture through the lens of baseball, and explores baseball not only as a pastime close to the hearts of many people in many communities, but also for Latinos as a place to advocate for rights and social justice. 

Finally, the prompts aid students in looking closely at a personal object of their choice and teasing out the story it tells.

Included here are the objects themselves, a bilingual video with curator Margaret Salazar-Porzio, three suggested Thinking Routines - "See, Think, Wonder," "The 3 Y's," and "Picture Writing" - from Harvard's Project Zero Artful Thinking and Global Thinking materials, and supporting digital content about the exhibition. 

For use in Social Studies, Spanish, English, and American History classes

#LatinoHAC #EthnicStudies



Philippa Rappoport
14
 

# Teaching Inquiry: Japanese Culture and History in the WWII and after

Collection of artifacts and sources that would help students understand. better Japanese history, culture in the past and present. 

Maria G Blake
231
 

#BecauseOfHerStory: Exploring Untold Stories through Portraiture and American Art

Learn how American art and portraiture can bring diverse women’s stories into your classroom, connecting with themes you may already teach. Discover strategies for engaging your students in close looking and critical thinking across disciplines.  #SAAMTeach #NPGteach

RELATED WEBINAR SERIES (recordings available): https://americanart.si.edu/education/k-12/professional-development/webinars

This project received support from the Smithsonian American Women’s History Initiative. To learn more, visit the Smithsonian American Women History Initiative website. #BecauseOfHerStory


Phoebe Hillemann
19
 

#ColorOurCollections at the National Portrait Gallery

This Learning Lab collection has been created to encourage learners of all ages to #ColorOurCollections and engage with our portraits! Each coloring page is followed by the portrait in our collection that the coloring page is based on. We invite you to compare and contrast your creation with our collections! What might you add to your portrait? What colors would you use? What choices did you make that were the same as  the choices the original artist made? What choices did you make that were different?

#NPGteach #myNPG

Ashley M. Paxton
47
 

#ColorOurCollections at the National Portrait Gallery

This Learning Lab collection has been created to encourage learners of all ages to #ColorOurCollections and engage with our portraits! Each coloring page is followed by the portrait in our collection that the coloring page is based on. We invite you to compare and contrast your creation with our collections! What might you add to your portrait? What colors would you use? What choices did you make that were the same as  the choices the original artist made? What choices did you make that were different?

#NPGteach #myNPG

Caitlin Blake
63
 

#ColorOurCollections at the National Portrait Gallery

This Learning Lab collection has been created to encourage learners of all ages to #ColorOurCollections and engage with our portraits! Each coloring page is followed by the portrait in our collection that the coloring page is based on. We invite you to compare and contrast your creation with our collections! What might you add to your portrait? What colors would you use? What choices did you make that were the same as  the choices the original artist made? What choices did you make that were different?

#NPGteach #myNPG

Melissa Sorrells
47
 

#Latinohac

Latino perspectives
Nancy Mastronardi
3
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