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Found 5,969 Collections

 

"The World of Your Senses": Parallel Perspectives from Tibetan Buddhism and Western Science on Sensory Perception

"The World of Your Senses" shares parallel perspectives from Tibetan Buddhism and western science on sensory perception. This collection explores the questions: How do we see? How does hearing work? How do we perceive smell? How does taste function? How do we sense touch? In addition, the Buddhist perspective includes a sixth sense... mind consciousness!

"The World of Your Senses" is the result of many years of work growing out of directives from His Holiness the Dalai Lama and his long history engaging Western scientists in dialogue. The script, content, and imagery were envisioned by a dedicated and curiosity-filled group of thirty Tibetan Buddhist monastics-in-exile from monasteries and nunneries in India, through the "Science for Monks and Nuns" program. The creation of the physical exhibit, launched in 2010, was supported through a unique collaboration between the Library of Tibetan Works and Archives (LWTA in Dharamsala, India), the Sager Family Foundation, the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D.C. (SCEMS/SCLDA & OEC/Smithsonian Exhibitions), and the Exploratorium in San Francisco. It has since traveled to the United States, Nepal, and Bhutan.

The resource is bi-lingual: English and Tibetan.

RELATED COLLECTIONS:

Senses Series – Sight in Humans and Animals      (http://learninglab.si.edu/q/ll-c/n2f39XxkfBRJeHPk)

Senses Series – Hearing      (http://learninglab.si.edu/q/ll-c/7EbVTM49NgWiGrzA)

Senses Series – Smell      (http://learninglab.si.edu/q/ll-c/7LjjBHybUk9HE8Wj)

Senses Series – Taste     (http://learninglab.si.edu/q/ll-c/2w7r7PVoAgghiYmL)

Senses Series – Touch     (http://learninglab.si.edu/q/ll-c/oon5rHojeyrEwNEE)


This collection is based Science For Monks, World of Your Senses (2010).

Tracie Spinale
28
 

"Their Stories: Lowell's Youth and the Refugee Experience"

This exhibit at Lowell National Historical Park, Lowell, Massachusetts, features the stories of five refugees who came to Lowell as teenagers. As they established new lives here, they tried to maintain their cultural heritage while building a sense of belonging in the United States. Read their stories and hear, in their own words, why they left their home countries, their experiences as refugees, and how they are adapting to life in Lowell.  

#TCSLowell #APA2018

Tsongas Industrial History Center
8
 

"Think Different": Steve Jobs

What does it mean to be influenced by the world around you? This collection looks at the technical innovations, design influences (Japanese Zen Buddhist, Italian, Bauhaus); location influences (Yosemite, Silicon Valley); and cultural and musical influences (Bob Dylan, Edwin Land) which inspired Steve Jobs to "think different" and create digital products which changed the world.

Keywords: inventor, biography, technology, innovation

Tracie Spinale
46
 

"Votes for Women!" A Comparative Look at British and US Suffrage Movements

The resources in this collection provide a comparative look into the similarities and differences of the Suffrage Movements in both the UK and the US. 

Emily Surman
19
 

"Water Matters" Online Conference Series: Archive and Illustration Summaries

This online conference series invites educators and students to take an active role in global environmental issues around water. Learn from experts in the field, share ideas, and collaborate with people around the world who, like you, are committed to solving environmental challenges. Includes illustration summaries and the archive of each session, with interdisciplinary connections to water issues . Original Airdates: Spring 2012
Ashley Naranjo
42
 

"We Didn't Start The Fire": World Headlines, 1949-1989

"We Didn't Start the Fire" is a song by Billy Joel. Its lyrics include brief, rapid-fire allusions to more than 100 headline events between 1949, the year of Joel's birth, and 1989, when the song was released. This topical collection and image gallery represents references in the song. What makes these events headlines? What events does Joel leave out? How do these resources reflect the headlines, ideas, and concerns addressed by Joel? 

sheishistoric
99
 

"We the People": Flash Card Activity and Template

This collection includes a variety of resources on the theme, "We the People," a template document  for teachers to create their own  flashcard activity with Learning Lab images, and strategies to use them.

This collection was created for the 2018 cohort of the Smithsonian-Montgomery College Faculty Fellowship Program on the theme, "We the People: America's Grand and Radical Experiment with Democracy." But anyone can use it.

Strategies: Begin by selecting your own set of images. (Feel free to copy this collection and then adapt as you like.) When creating your flashcards, use the template from the last learning tile, and add relevant text diagonally below the object. Print double-sided flipping on the SHORT side.

After distributing the cards, have students select one or two that speak to them. Then have them discuss the following questions in groups and share out.

Supporting Questions:
What themes do you see?
Do you see these themes across the objects and over time?

Essential Questions:
Using these images, define American Democracy.
What other resources might you use to tell a fuller story?


Keywords: #MCteach


Philippa Rappoport
50
 

"What makes someone a Hero?"

This is a collection of heroes / leaders in a variety of areas to help define the notion of "What is a Hero?"

randiseli
21
 

"Women's Work"

This collection explores the conception of "women's work" and challenges users to think about whether such a phrase has meaning.

Teachers and students can use the collection in a number of ways: grouping or sorting the resources chronologically to explore change over time; writing definitions of "women's work" for different time periods; completing image or text analysis on individual resources; or researching women's contributions in a particular field.

This is a work-in-progress based on the digitized materials within the Smithsonian Learning Lab's collection--it is not meant to be wholly definitive or authoritative. In fact, this could be a point of discussion: what, or who, do you think is missing from this collection?

Kate Harris
35
 

"Words can lie or clarify" by Aiko Herzig-Yoshinaga

In 1981, Aiko Herzig-Yoshinaga submitted a memorandum on the subject “Use of term ‘concentration camps’” to the executive director of the Commission on Wartime Relocation and Internment of Civilians (CWRIC). Included in this collection is background information on the Japanese American Incarceration era and Executive Order 9066, alongside Herzig-Yoshinaga's own words. In response to reading through this memorandum, students can apply Project Zero Thinking Routines to what they already know about the Japanese American Incarceration era and what interests them for further research. Additionally, students can begin to connect ideas from Herzig-Yoshinaga's memorandum to artifacts, documents and photographs of the era, noting especially the nuances in the meaning of words used and interpret some of these euphemisms in context.

#APA2018

Related collection of interest around language found within the Civilian Exclusion Order: Document Analysis: Civilian Exclusion Order and Japanese American Incarceration During WWII

Ashley Naranjo
50
 

"¡Pleibol!”: Close Looking to Explore One Family’s Story of Latino Baseball

This teaching collection helps students to look closely and think critically by using three Thinking Routines to explore the cultural relevance of one family's baseball-related objects from an exhibition at the National Museum of American History, "¡Pleibol!: In the Barrios and the Big Leagues." The exhibition seeks to document the history of Latino culture through the lens of baseball, and explores baseball not only as a pastime close to the hearts of many people in many communities, but also for Latinos as a place to advocate for rights and social justice. 

Finally, the prompts aid students in looking closely at a personal object of their choice and teasing out the story it tells.

Included here are the objects themselves, a bilingual video with curator Margaret Salazar-Porzio, three suggested Thinking Routines - "See, Think, Wonder," "The 3 Y's," and "Picture Writing" - from Harvard's Project Zero Artful Thinking and Global Thinking materials, and supporting digital content about the exhibition. 

For use in Social Studies, Spanish, English, and American History classes

#LatinoHAC #EthnicStudies



Philippa Rappoport
14
 

# Teaching Inquiry: Japanese Culture and History in the WWII and after

Collection of artifacts and sources that would help students understand. better Japanese history, culture in the past and present. 

Maria G Blake
231
 

#BecauseOfHerStory: Exploring Untold Stories through Portraiture and American Art

This collection features resources related to a November 22, 2019 session presented at the National Council for the Social Studies (NCSS) annual conference. 

Learn how American art and portraiture can bring diverse women’s stories into your classroom, connecting with themes you may already teach. Discover strategies for engaging your students in close looking and critical thinking across disciplines.  #SAAMTeach #NPGteach

RELATED WEBINAR SERIES (recordings available): https://americanart.si.edu/education/k-12/professional-development/webinars

This project received support from the Smithsonian American Women’s History Initiative. To learn more, visit the Smithsonian American Women History Initiative website. #BecauseOfHerStory


Phoebe Hillemann
19
 

#Latinohac

Latino perspectives
Nancy Mastronardi
3
 

#NPGteach The Ladies In and Out of the White House: Not Just A Pretty Face

Looking closely at the women married to our President's. Learn more about the individuals and the contributions they themselves made. Using Learning to Look Strategies to go beyond the pretty faces.

Nancy Gavrish
18
 

#SAAM Teach?Julia Agnew

Collection for "What makes a community?" Lesson.
Summer 2016. (In Progress)
Julia Agnew
9
 

#SmithStories

Smithsonian Trip Storytelling: Devour in Adventure

Aleena Natividad
1
 

#Smithstories

Digital Story from trip to the Smithsonian 

Jonathan Yohannes
1
 

#SmithStories

My Heritage on Display

Jamison Griffin
1
 

#Teaching Inquiry - Ancient Rome Daily Life

#TeachingInquiry

Use evidence from a collection of items from Ancient Rome to draw conclusions on the daily life of Roman Citizens. Link your thinking to your learning about the social classes of Rome and who may have used the detailed items. Consider the following questions in your investigation

1.Are routines in daily life influenced by Social Status?

2. Compare the daily life of Ancient Roman Patricians with Plebeians or Slaves

3. What are some of your daily routines?

4. Compare using a 3 circle venn diagram your daily routines with Ancient Rome and Serah/Ethiopia P53 from your textbook

5. How do daily routines change from place to place?

6. Does government structure influence daily life for individuals?  Discuss with reference to Ancient Rome.

Brooke Tonev
21
 

(re)Telling Our Stories--We Are Seeds!

On a good day, my students feel as though our country is trying to bury them. On a bad day, they feel as though their stories are being told for them--ugly stories where they and their families become murderers, rapists and drug dealers. 

The mission of the National Portrait Gallery is to tell the story of America by portraying the people who shape the nation’s history, development and culture. In a sense, NPG decides who is America, and if my students walked through the gallery, they would be told quite clearly that they are not a part of this country.

This collection and connected lesson ideas are grounded in a quote from one of Kehinde Wiley's models in Economy of Grace, a documentary filled with incredibly powerful women who don't get a single mention in the IMBD credits.

"You don't have to be a super model or someone important to be seen."

I strive to help my students be seen and tell their stories.

This collection was created in conjunction with the National Portrait Gallery's 2019 Learning to Look Summer Teacher Institute. #kehindewiley #npgteach #theytriedtoburyus

#weareseeds

Charles Sanderson
25
 

10 Causes to the Civil War

In this collection, students will examine to what extent each of these events caused the Civil War. After reviewing the informaiton, they will be responsible for ranking these events from mostly effected the Civil War (1) to barely effected the Civil War (10).

Tyler Hofer
10
 

10 Causes to the Civil War

In this collection, students will examine to what extent each of these events caused the Civil War. After reviewing the informaiton, they will be responsible for ranking these events from mostly effected the Civil War (1) to barely effected the Civil War (10).

Glenn Wiebe
10
 

13 Revolutions

"The Revolution was in the Minds and Hearts of the People," John Adams wrote on 13 Feb. 1818. The colonists' drive to independence marked a new era of American history, Adams thought, when "Thirteen Clocks were made to Strike together; a perfection of Mechanism which no Artist had ever before effected."

So how did people experience the American Revolution?

1. Take a look at the material culture and manuscript resources shown below. Using 3-5 items ONLY, write a SHORT recap (1 paragraph) of the Revolution's rise and progress, ca. 1760s-1780s.

2. Then, nominate 1 MORE Smithsonian item to join this gallery. Choose any artifact/manuscript that you think we MUST see in order to understand vast early America's revolutionary culture--and tell us WHY.

As you build your history, which episodes and people come to the fore? How does the big picture change?
Sara Georgini
29
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