Skip to Content
  • Language
  • End User
  • Educational Use
  • Time Required
(929)
(4,644)
(4,778)
(3,462)
(5,316)
(58)
(1,832)
(1,318)
(544)
(2,470)
(997)
(870)

Found 5,573 Collections

 

Benjamin Franklin's method of habit formation.

Benjamin Franklin, inventor, statesman, writer, publisher and economist relates in his autobiography that early in his life he decided to focus on arriving at moral perfection. He made a list of 13 virtues, assigning a page to each. Under each virtue, he wrote a summary that gave it fuller meaning. Then he practised each one for a certain length of time.

To make these virtues a habit, Franklin can up with a method to grade himself on his daily actions. In a journal, he drew a table with a row for every virtue and a column for every day of the week. Every time he made a fault, he made a mark in the appropriate column. Each week he focused his attention on a different virtue. Over time, through repetition, he hoped to one day experience the pleasure of “viewing a clean Book.”

Akash Mahurkar
0
 

Memorable Moments

Look at the images. . . 

  • What is happening?
  • Who do you think these people are?
  • Do you have a memory of doing something similar? 

ART MAKING CHALLENGE:  Create an artwork that depicts a memory of something you enjoyed with family or friends. The artwork could be a drawing, painting, or collage.

Jean-Marie Galing
7
 

Daniel Boone and American Ginseng: Truth and Legend

Who was Daniel Boone? Was he more than a stereotypical tough frontier hero? Explore Daniel Boone and his relationship to the valuable native plant, ginseng, through this collection and activities. 

Daniel Boone was a historic person who spent much of his adult life blazing trails through the American wilderness.  Through exploration and opening the wilderness, Boone and others were able to exploit its many rich resources, including the profitable plant, American ginseng.  It also rose Boone to the status of  American legend, becoming known as someone who braved hardship and danger to bring the earth's resources, like ginseng, to the market.  The legend of Daniel Boone and his "lost" ginseng illustrates the way such stories can reflect historical fact and circumstance.  They can become exaggerated or distorted through being passing along by many story tellers over time, and now even via the internet. Therefore, history and fiction become intertwined. 

Although Boone has come and gone, wild ginseng is still searched for and gathered in the mountainous regions that Boone frequented. Learn more about Daniel Boone's adventures and American ginseng throughout this collection. This collection supports close reading for the understanding of facts and details.  

To continue to learn more about Daniel Boone and his efforts to explore the wilderness, visit the learning lab collection titled "The Wilderness Road" .

Julia Eanes
25
 

PERSISTING AND RESISTING: EXPLORING WOMEN AS ACTIVISTS

How have women led the way in activism and social justice movements? 

This collection features resources related to the October 8, 2019, professional development webinar, "Persisting and Resisting: Exploring Women as Activists," hosted by educators from the Smithsonian American Art Museum and the National Portrait Gallery.  This joint webinar is one of three in the series A Woman’s Place Is in the Curriculum: Women’s History through American Art and Portraiture. Learn how American art and portraiture can bring diverse women’s stories into your classroom, connecting with themes you may already teach. Discover strategies for engaging your students in close looking and critical thinking across disciplines.  #SAAMTeach #NPGteach

This project received support from the Smithsonian American Women’s History Initiative. To learn more, visit the Smithsonian American Women History Initiative website.
#BecauseOfHerStory


Anne Showalter
13
 

“A letter from a girl to the world”

SAAMTeach

Cristi Marchetti
6
 

Ancient religious architectures VS. Modern religious architectures

Inside this Ancient religious architectures VS. Modern religious architecture collection, I will be showing various religious architectures/buildings from the ancient times vs the modern religious building that we have right now. The purpose of creating this collection is because I want to distinguish the difference between the religious architecture around the world and compare it to what the architectures look like back in the old time, since both are religious building, it both are dedicated to a specific goddess, but their outside look looks totally different. The history of architecture is concerned with religious buildings other than any other type. People use the buildings such as temples, churches, mosques, etc. as a place to worship and sometimes shelter. Those religious architectures are also known as the Sacred architectures, many cultures and countries devoted their resources to their sacred buildings to show their respect for their goddess and to worship them. We don’t just see them in ancient history. Today, there is still building being built in the modern world purely for religious reasons, such as churches and temples. In this collection, I will be showing a mix of modern religious buildings and ancient buildings, I will be comparing the two different centuries architectures through pictures.

#AHMC2019

Jenny Chou
12
 

My Smithsonian Closet

You could be exceptionally well-dressed if the Smithsonian were your closet.

Darren Milligan
30
 

Test

Gail Zwerling
5
 

Power Posters by designExplorr

Learn about the power of designing posters that communicate meaningful messages using Adobe Spark. Adobe Spark is the easiest and quickest way to create visually stunning graphics. In this workshop students will develop meaningful messages, discover the three things that make posters powerful, and determine what makes a poster work. This presentation also includes guiding questions to help direct the students learning such as, "What is the posters message?," "What kind of imagery is used?," "Who is the poster for?," and "What makes the poster work?" Materials used in this workshop are a pictures of historic powerful poster, a discovery worksheet, and two supporting videos. This workshop is for youth (ages 12-16).

designExplorr
19
 

Storytelling Training: Brainstorming and Going into the Field

Whether you're participating in the Stories: YES program in conjunction with a Museum on Main Street exhibition or creating digital stories on your own, the six modules in the Storytelling Training Series will help you think through everything to help get started. Unlike the other Storytelling Training courses where information is given to you, you'll be asked to contribute ideas for your own potential story in this course. There's no right or wrong answers here. It's a way to help you start planning. Remember to make a copy of this collection first if you want your answers to be saved so you can revisit them!

This training module was created by the Smithsonian's Museum on Main Street program, a part of the Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service, in conjunction with the MuseWeb Foundation.

SITES Museum on Main Street
12
 

Storytelling Training: Creating Your Story

Whether you're participating in the Stories: YES program in conjunction with a Museum on Main Street exhibition or creating digital stories on your own, the six modules in the Storytelling Training Series will help you think through everything to help get started. Ready to start developing your story? In this short course, you'll get some tips on how to create a story board, writing a non-fiction script, and more. 

This training module was created by the Smithsonian's Museum on Main Street program, a part of the Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service, in conjunction with the MuseWeb Foundation.

SITES Museum on Main Street
27
 

Storytelling Training: What is Cultural Storytelling?

Whether you're participating in the Stories: YES program in conjunction with a Museum on Main Street exhibition or creating digital stories on your own, the six modules in the Storytelling Training Series will help you think through everything to help get started. In this short online course, you'll learn about what we call "cultural storytelling" and  what the value of cultural storytelling is to society at large. 

This training module was created by the Smithsonian's Museum on Main Street program, a part of the Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service, in conjunction with the MuseWeb Foundation. 

SITES Museum on Main Street
16
 

Storytelling Training: What Makes a Great Story?

Whether you're participating in the Stories: YES program in conjunction with a Museum on Main Street exhibition or creating digital stories on your own, the six modules in the Storytelling Training Series will help you think through everything to help get started. In this course, you'll  learn about the parts that make stories compelling, especially non-fiction narratives which are unique stories grounded in real-life perspectives and history. Explore how your story can be both personal and research-based at the same time. Even documentaries start with a script!

This training module was created by the Smithsonian's Museum on Main Street program, a part of the Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service, in conjunction with the MuseWeb Foundation. 

SITES Museum on Main Street
22
 

Software makes cyberbullies think twice

Social media is a place where people can express their opinions.  The internet is an unregulated world that has no forms of morals and it is also a frontier for cyber bullying. Young people are exposed to violence, verbal outbursts, nudism  and explicit sexual content. When consumed for a long time, all these contents can lead to some serious issues. For instance, they may start having anxiety attacks and start to register them in their minds which can lead to mental issues.  The following statement is from a then 13 year old from Chicago named Trisha Prabhu. She had came home from school and read a news story about an 11-year-old girl who had committed suicide by jumping off her town’s water tower. In the months before her death, the girl had been repeatedly cyberbullied.

“I was shocked, heart-broken and angry,” says Prabhu, now 15. “I knew I had to do something to stop this from ever happening again.”

So Prabhu came up with a cyber-solution for cyberbullying. She invented a software called ReThink, which scans social media messages for offensive content, and gives the writer a chance to reconsider whether he or she really wants to post. The program, which can be installed by parents on home computers or by teachers on school computers, uses context-sensitive word screening to flag messages for content. 

For Prabhu, ReThink is personal. She too had been cyberbullied in her younger years, receiving nasty messages about her clothes.

“I’m what you’d call thick-skinned, so I just brushed it off and moved on,” Prabhu says. “But after reading about this story, I realized that many adolescents were really affected by these offensive messages, especially if the cyberbullying was repeated and targeted.”   

Cyberbullying is indeed a serious and growing problem. Research shows 43 percent of kids have experienced cyberbullying. Some 70 percent of students report seeing “frequent” online bullying. Bullying victims are up to nine times more likely to consider suicide.

ReThink works on the principle that the adolescent brain is like a “car with no brakes,” Prabhu says. “It’s all too well-known that adolescents make impulsive, rash decisions.”

It has indeed been well-established that the prefrontal cortex—a region of the brain important for self-control and decision-making—doesn’t fully develop until a person is about 25 years old. This is likely a major factor behind teenagers’ sometimes irresponsible and risky decisions—texting and driving, fighting, even simply neglecting homework in favor of hanging out with friends.

Prabhu has received numerous accolades for her work. She was a global finalist in the Google Science Fair, selected to exhibit at the White House Science Fair and received a Global Anti-Bullying Hero award from Auburn University, among other honors.

Prabhu has long been fascinated by computer science; she first began learning to code at age 11 through a local technology education program for kids. Since developing ReThink, she has created a free ReThink app for smartphones. She’s also rolled out a ReThink “ambassador” program for schools, where student representatives spread anti-cyberbullying messages to their classmates and students are invited to take an anti-cyberbullying pledge.

Prabhu has received multiple messages from people who know firsthand the trauma cyberbullying can cause—parents whose children have committed suicide after repeated cyberbullying, police officers who deal with cyberbullying on a criminal level, school counselors and administrators who struggle to help cyberbullied students. And then there are the victims themselves. One particularly memorable note Prabhu received was not from a teenager, but from an adult, a retired teacher who had been bullied for years by an adult adopted daughter. “Trisha,” the woman wrote, “ReThink would not only help adolescents, it would help adults too.”

To test how it works, I downloaded ReThink to my iPhone. I started to post "I hate you" to a Facebook wall (with no intentions, of course, of actually posting it), and a ReThink bubble popped up. “Let’s change these words to make it positive,” it suggested. “You’re a fat,” I began, and I was interrupted by “Don’t say things that you may regret later!” ReThink has a high sensitivity for obscenities. When I started the missive with a four-letter word, the ReThink bubble showed up to ask “Are these words really you?”

That said, the program did not catch everything. I was able to type "You're ugly and stupid" without getting a ReThink message, and somehow "nobody likes you, you idiot" also snuck through. 

Though ReThink is clearly not yet a perfect tool for capturing all cyber cruelty, when it does offer teens a second chance they tend to take it. According to research conducted with ReThink, teens change their mind about posting the hurtful messages 93 percent of the time.

Prabhu ultimately hopes to have ReThink installed for free on school computers and libraries across the country, and even the world—she has plans to develop the program in multiple languages.

“I look forward to a day when we have conquered cyberbullying,” she says. 

http://www.smithsonianmag.com/innovation/new-software-makes-cyberbullies-think-twice-180956948/

 http://www.smithsonianmag.com/smart-news/do-social-media-death-threats-count-real-threats-or-just-digital-venting-180953506/




Rosemith Metayer
1
 

Cardboard Challenge - Global Game STEAM Challenge

Grades 3-5 are going Global! Through inquiry based and maker centered design, students create games in teams. They move through the design cycle to brainstorm, sketch, prototype, build and iterate their games. The celebration of learning is the day of play when students play each other's games. 

This collection is a collection of art to inspire the stories and user experience component of their designs. As a 21st century skill, they learn user experience in the design lab. So, they have to have characters and a story to give their game depth. As a result, the user experience is enhanced. 

Let's create and play! 

#GoGlobal

Sandra Vilevac
53
 

Black Panther Movie Collection

The visual arts can be an entry point to literacy in the classroom.  Use these objects in the collection of the National Museum of African Art to aid students to explore authentic African art works that inspired the Academy Award winning costume design of Ruth Carter in the blockbuster movie Black Panther.  Students can develop visual vocabulary through close looking to describe mood, tone, atmosphere, and inference and explore cross-curricular and cross cultural connections.  It allows them to really be creative and critical thinkers!  

Learn more about distance learning opportunities from the National Museum of African Art by visiting the Center for Interactive Learning and Collaboration (CILC).

Keywords: NJPSA

Deborah Stokes
89
 

Demeter and Persephone: A feminist reading

This collection demonstrates a feminist reading of the Greek fertility myth "Demeter and Persephone." In this myth, we can see how patriarchy supplanted matriarchy and worship of a great goddess. Persephone's fate is in the hands of her father, Zeus, who, while acknowledging that Demeter has power, is able to suppress that power and bestow his daughter onto Hades. With the help of Rhea, the women are able to partially undo Zeus and Hades' plan, so they still maintain some power, but they remain unable to completely overthrow the mens' desires. Instead of using her own power to regain her daughter, Demeter has to use her anger to persuade Zeus to help her recover the daughter he gave away. 

Megan Howard
6
 

Ingenuity Challenge 2019

RebeccaBeakerhead
6
 

Art as Resistance (2)

  • How may art be a tool of resistance? 
  • How have  historical movements used art to further their causes? 
  • How might current movements use art to further their causes?
Sher Anderson Petty
16
 

Segregation

Mabi Aleman
1
 

The Value of a Sketch

A design project’s aesthetics and cultural impact are usually the primary consideration as to the effectiveness and quality of a designer's approach to problem-solving. What is often overlooked in these perspectives are the various preliminary approaches that designers employ—how do we visualize and ultimately share our ideas with others?

Within design education, projects are usually conceived to help expose students to the “design process,” an often-complex journey of experiments and discoveries. This process helps guide students in the creation of future successful design solutions. With the progress of the digital experience (PowerPoint presentations, iPhone apps, and Virtual Reality), the art of the sketch seems to be a casualty of the current state of the design process.

What can we learn from a sketch? Is the sketch a dead art form, forever packed away in folders or archives never to be seen again? Or, can we reevaluate its historical contributions in the design process and creation of artful typographic syntax and hierarchy, image creation, and narrative development?

 Most often, these small, thumbnail sketches speak only to a limited audience (Art Directors, other designers, or only the designer themselves) and therefore usually have a limited impact. But, in the hands of a skilled and creative designer, these sketches can mean the difference between success or failure, the green light or the idea being squashed.

As a supplement to several educational design projects, this collection attempts to expose students to the value of the simple pencil sketch. How can we use the sketching process to encourage young designers to visualize away from the computer and avoid the digital “sameness” pervasive in our visual world?

This collection attempts to chronicle the process of various designers and their projects (both large and small, complex, and simple) and presents their approach to preliminary ideation through the sketching process. The collection includes thumbnails, photographs, color studies, line reductions as well as the completed project in hopes of revealing The Value of a Simple Sketch.

Designers/Artist included:

Willi Kunz, Swiss-born Kunz played a major role in introduction of the new typography developed from Basel to the United States where he currently lives and works.

Dan Friedman, (1945–1995) noted American graphic and furniture designer and educator. One of the significant contributors to the New Wave typography movement.

Painter Piet Mondrian, (1872–1944) was the leader of the Dutch De Stijl movement where he implemented an extreme visual vocabulary consisting of planes of primary colors, simplified right angles, and linear accents.

Tom Engeman, stamper designer and Illustrator

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ned Drew
91
 

Disney

Amelia Tehrani
9
 

The positive and negative impacts of social media on our youths today

The use of social media has both negative and positive impacts on youths. Some of the positive impacts include making them up to date on events that are happening around the world and also enables them to network and stay connected with their fellow youths and friends without physical meetings. Additionally, youths can create pages and groups in the social media platforms where they can built friendship with other youths who may share the same values with them and this can lead to long time friendship.  

Even though social media seem to connect youths and make them stay up to date, but it can also leads to  isolation, depression, anxiety and many other problems.  Social media reduces the number of face-to face interactions,  it can also decreases their productivity in school because of the amount of long hours they spend on these sites. Social media is also a platform where bullying can take place. Peer pressure is another concern for youths who are on these social sites. For example, they may look at pictures or videos of their peers doing illegal things such as drugs, drinking etc and they may have the urge to try these drugs because they may feel pressured by their friends, they don't want to be left out and not being a part of the crowd. 

 In conclusion, social networks has been proved to have both positive and negative effects on our youths. As parents we should guide and advise our children about the dangers of being in these sites when they are misused and overused. 


Rosemith Metayer
22
 

Software makes cyberbullies think twice

Over the past two decades, social media have gained so much growth and fame to an extent that many researchers are now interested in learning more about these social platforms and their effects on our youths.  The internet is an unregulated world that has no forms of morals and it is also a frontier for cyber bullying. Young people are exposed to violence, verbal outbursts, nudism  and explicit sexual content. When consumed for a long time, all these contents can lead to some serious issues. For instance, they may start having anxiety attacks and start to register them in their minds which can lead to mental issues. Researchers have found that these social sites impact the lives of our youth a great deal in terms of morals, behavior and even education wise. 

  The following statement is from a then 13 year old from Chicago named Trisha Prabhu. She had came home from school and read a news story about an 11-year-old girl who had committed suicide by jumping off her town’s water tower. In the months before her death, the girl had been repeatedly cyberbullied.

“I was shocked, heart-broken and angry,” says Prabhu, now 15. “I knew I had to do something to stop this from ever happening again.”

So Prabhu came up with a cyber-solution for cyberbullying. She invented a software called ReThink, which scans social media messages for offensive content, and gives the writer a chance to reconsider whether he or she really wants to post. The program, which can be installed by parents on home computers or by teachers on school computers, uses context-sensitive word screening to flag messages for content. 

For Prabhu, ReThink is personal. She too had been cyberbullied in her younger years, receiving nasty messages about her clothes.

“I’m what you’d call thick-skinned, so I just brushed it off and moved on,” Prabhu says. “But after reading about this story, I realized that many adolescents were really affected by these offensive messages, especially if the cyberbullying was repeated and targeted.”   

Cyberbullying is indeed a serious and growing problem. Research shows 43 percent of kids have experienced cyberbullying. Some 70 percent of students report seeing “frequent” online bullying. Bullying victims are up to nine times more likely to consider suicide.

ReThink works on the principle that the adolescent brain is like a “car with no brakes,” Prabhu says. “It’s all too well-known that adolescents make impulsive, rash decisions.”

It has indeed been well-established that the prefrontal cortex—a region of the brain important for self-control and decision-making—doesn’t fully develop until a person is about 25 years old. This is likely a major factor behind teenagers’ sometimes irresponsible and risky decisions—texting and driving, fighting, even simply neglecting homework in favor of hanging out with friends.

Prabhu has received numerous accolades for her work. She was a global finalist in the Google Science Fair, selected to exhibit at the White House Science Fair and received a Global Anti-Bullying Hero award from Auburn University, among other honors.

Prabhu has long been fascinated by computer science; she first began learning to code at age 11 through a local technology education program for kids. Since developing ReThink, she has created a free ReThink app for smartphones. She’s also rolled out a ReThink “ambassador” program for schools, where student representatives spread anti-cyberbullying messages to their classmates and students are invited to take an anti-cyberbullying pledge.

Prabhu has received multiple messages from people who know firsthand the trauma cyberbullying can cause—parents whose children have committed suicide after repeated cyberbullying, police officers who deal with cyberbullying on a criminal level, school counselors and administrators who struggle to help cyberbullied students. And then there are the victims themselves. One particularly memorable note Prabhu received was not from a teenager, but from an adult, a retired teacher who had been bullied for years by an adult adopted daughter. “Trisha,” the woman wrote, “ReThink would not only help adolescents, it would help adults too.”

To test how it works, I downloaded ReThink to my iPhone. I started to post "I hate you" to a Facebook wall (with no intentions, of course, of actually posting it), and a ReThink bubble popped up. “Let’s change these words to make it positive,” it suggested. “You’re a fat,” I began, and I was interrupted by “Don’t say things that you may regret later!” ReThink has a high sensitivity for obscenities. When I started the missive with a four-letter word, the ReThink bubble showed up to ask “Are these words really you?”

That said, the program did not catch everything. I was able to type "You're ugly and stupid" without getting a ReThink message, and somehow "nobody likes you, you idiot" also snuck through. 

Though ReThink is clearly not yet a perfect tool for capturing all cyber cruelty, when it does offer teens a second chance they tend to take it. According to research conducted with ReThink, teens change their mind about posting the hurtful messages 93 percent of the time.

Prabhu ultimately hopes to have ReThink installed for free on school computers and libraries across the country, and even the world—she has plans to develop the program in multiple languages.

“I look forward to a day when we have conquered cyberbullying,” she says. 

http://www.smithsonianmag.com/innovation/new-software-makes-cyberbullies-think-twice-180956948/

 http://www.smithsonianmag.com/smart-news/do-social-media-death-threats-count-real-threats-or-just-digital-venting-180953506/




Rosemith Metayer
1
49-72 of 5,573 Collections