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indiVISIBLE: African-Native American Lives in the Americas

National Museum of the American Indian

indiVISIBLE: African-Native American Lives in the Americas

National Museum of the American Indian

i3 PLC Leaders Becoming an Increasingly Effective Collaborative Team 11.20.2014

Smithsonian Science Education Center
Join Robert Reetz (Mounds View Public Schools) on this webinar as he discusses how teams can develop the kind of interdependence, relational trust, collective efficacy, and critical mind frames necessary for producing an increase in both student achievement and teacher effectiveness.

fly guy

Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden
Experimenting with collage style animation.

dice guy

Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden
Experimenting with collage style animation.

crab attack

Smithsonian Environmental Research Center

cownose ray 1

Smithsonian Environmental Research Center

click! photography changes who we are

Smithsonian Institution
click! photography changes everything is a conversation about how photography shapes our culture and our lives. In this episode, Lonnie Bunch, Director of the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture, talks about how photographic images play a central role in shaping cultural identity. View more stories and photos at /www.click.si.edu.

click! photography changes everything introduction

Smithsonian Institution
click! photography changes everything is a conversation about how photography shapes our culture and our lives. In this episode, Merry A. Foresta, Director of the Smithsonian Photography Initiative and Marvin Heiferman, Curator of click! photography changes everything talk about a new Smithsonian Photography Initiative project. View stories and photos at /www.click.si.edu.

chandratest1

Office of Public Affairs

cELLAbration Live! A Tribute to Ella Jenkins

Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage
Ella Jenkins, "The First Lady of Children's Music," has made dozens of recordings and earned many awards in her 50-year career, including the Lifetime Achievement Award from the Recording Academy. This DVD features a live concert tribute to Ella by some of today's finest folk music and children's performers. 60 minutes, interviews with the artists, photo gallery. Become a fan of Ella Jenkins on Facebook! http://www.facebook.com/pages/Ella-Jenkins/124317344298 To purchase or find out more about this DVD visit: http://www.folkways.si.edu/albumdetails.aspx?itemid=3200 and for more information about Smithsonian Folkways , the non-profit record label of the national museum, click here: http://www.folkways.si.edu/index.aspx The content and comments posted here are subject to the Smithsonian Institution copyright and privacy policy (/www.si.edu/copyright/). Smithsonian reserves the right in its sole discretion to remove any content at any time. ©2008 Smithsonian Institution

bumblebee-vertical-lift.mov

Office of Public Affairs
This slow-motion video shows a bumblebee lifting a string of weights in the Animal Flight Laboratory at the University of California, Berkeley. The left side of the screen shows the testing chamber from above, looking down upon the experiment. The right side is a lateral view of the chamber as seen in a mirror set at a 45-degree angle. The mirror allows scientists to see how high the bee is flying. Slowing down the audio recording of this experiment enables researchers to calculate the wingbeat frequency of a bee during periods of maximum vertical lift. (Video courtesy Robert Buchwald, University of California, Berkeley)

batman

Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden
Experimenting with collage style animation.

atratus.mov

Smithsonian Institution
This movie shows frame-by-frame views of the movements of a wingless gliding ant (Cephalotes atratus) suspended in the updraft of a wind tunnel chamber. The three images are from above and two sides, and all are synched. These tree-dwelling ants are capable of a directed aerial descent (DAD) should they fall from high-up in the tree canopy. DAD is a defensive behavior that allows an ant to glide backwards and steer itself toward and land on the trunk of the tree from which it fell. In this way it is saved from the distant, hostile and unfamiliar terrain of the forest floor.Video credit Yonatan Munk, UC Berkeley.

Zuni Olla Maidens 5

National Museum of the American Indian
As part of the museum's Native American Heritage Month Ceramics of the Southwest program, the Zuni Olla Maidens perform dances and songs that pay homage to their female ancestors, who labored to get water for daily sustenance by balancing large olla jars on their heads. The Zuni Olla Maidens are known for the Pottery Dance, in which they move in carefully choreographed steps with delicate painted pottery jars balanced on their heads. The group, led by Loretta Beyuka and Juanita Edaakie, are all related by blood and are citizens of the Zuni Pueblo in New Mexico. This is the last of five presentations they gave that was live webcast and recorded at the Potomac Atrium of the National Museum of the American Indian on November 14, 2015.

Zuni Olla Maidens 4

National Museum of the American Indian
As part of the museum's Native American Heritage Month Ceramics of the Southwest program, the Zuni Olla Maidens perform dances and songs that pay homage to their female ancestors, who labored to get water for daily sustenance by balancing large olla jars on their heads. The Zuni Olla Maidens are known for the Pottery Dance, in which they move in carefully choreographed steps with delicate painted pottery jars balanced on their heads. The group, led by Loretta Beyuka and Juanita Edaakie, are all related by blood and are citizens of the Zuni Pueblo in New Mexico. This is the fourth of five presentations they gave that was live webcast and recorded at the Potomac Atrium of the National Museum of the American Indian on November 14, 2015.

Zuni Olla Maidens 3

National Museum of the American Indian
As part of the museum's Native American Heritage Month Ceramics of the Southwest program, the Zuni Olla Maidens perform dances and songs that pay homage to their female ancestors, who labored to get water for daily sustenance by balancing large olla jars on their heads. The Zuni Olla Maidens are known for the Pottery Dance, in which they move in carefully choreographed steps with delicate painted pottery jars balanced on their heads. The group, led by Loretta Beyuka and Juanita Edaakie, are all related by blood and are citizens of the Zuni Pueblo in New Mexico. This is the third of five presentations they gave that was live webcast and recorded at the Potomac Atrium of the National Museum of the American Indian on November 14, 2015.

Zuni Olla Maidens 2

National Museum of the American Indian
As part of the museum's Native American Heritage Month Ceramics of the Southwest program, the Zuni Olla Maidens perform dances and songs that pay homage to their female ancestors, who labored to get water for daily sustenance by balancing large olla jars on their heads. The Zuni Olla Maidens are known for the Pottery Dance, in which they move in carefully choreographed steps with delicate painted pottery jars balanced on their heads. The group, led by Loretta Beyuka and Juanita Edaakie, are all related by blood and are citizens of the Zuni Pueblo in New Mexico. This is the second of five presentations they gave that was live webcast and recorded at the Potomac Atrium of the National Museum of the American Indian on November 14, 2015.

Zuni Olla Maidens 1

National Museum of the American Indian
As part of the museum's Native American Heritage Month Ceramics of the Southwest program, the Zuni Olla Maidens perform dances and songs that pay homage to their female ancestors, who labored to get water for daily sustenance by balancing large olla jars on their heads. The Zuni Olla Maidens are known for the Pottery Dance, in which they move in carefully choreographed steps with delicate painted pottery jars balanced on their heads. The group, led by Loretta Beyuka and Juanita Edaakie, are all related by blood and are citizens of the Zuni Pueblo in New Mexico. This is the first of five presentations they gave that was live webcast and recorded at the Potomac Atrium of the National Museum of the American Indian on November 14, 2015.

Zulay Frente al Siglo XXI 1989

Human Studies Film Archives
title from credits (published work)--archival collection

Supplementary materials: audio tapes, still photographs, production files, correspondence, promotional materials and press clippings.

Archives also holds English language version released under the title Zulay Facing the 21st Century.

Wenner-Gren Foundation for Anthropological Research supported processing and the National Film Preservation Foundation and the Smithsonian Latino Center supported preservation of the Jorge Preloran Film Collection.

Cataloging supported by Smithsonian Institution Women's Committee

Donated by Jorge Preloran in 2007.

Edited ethnographic film, co-directed by Jorge Preloran, Mabel Preloran (an Argentine anthropologist) and Zulay Saravino (an indigenous Otavaleña of Equador) was filmed over a span of 8 years. The film is based on a dialogue between these two women as they discuss similar acculturation challenges they experienced while adapting to life in the United States. the dialogue raises universal questions on transculturation and the decisions that are faced on identity, education, economic advancement and emotional ties. The film also introduces us to the world of the indigenous Otavalo who forge an enduring cultural identity for themselves.

Zulal at the Smithsonian Folklife Festival

Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage
Armenian American trio Zulal performed at the 2018 Smithsonian Folklife Festival in Washington, D.C. Camera: Hannah Luc, Kevin Patrick, Jacob Weber, Andrea Curran, Jackson Harvey, David Barnes, Bryan Wilmot Story and editing: Matthew Archibald Interview: Charlie Weber [Catalog No. CFV11059, © 2018 Smithsonian Institution]

Zorro Wasn’t Mexican or Spanish, But… Irish?

Smithsonian Channel
Records reveal that one inspiration for the character of Zorro, a William Lamport who attempted to start a revolution in Mexico, was not Mexican or Spanish, but Irish. From the Series: Mystery Files: Zorro http://bit.ly/2g7V7TZ

Zoran Hadzibabic, "Equilibrium and non-equilibrium condensation of interacting bosons"

Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory
Zoran Hadzibabic, Department of Physics, Cavendish Laboratory, during the workshop of "Finite temperature and low energy effects in cold atomic and molecular few-and many-body systems", lecture titled "Equilibrium and non-equilibrium condensation of interacting bosons", at the Institute for Theoretical, Atomic and Molecular and Optical Physics, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, Massachusetts on March 25-27. 2013 © Harvard University and Zoran Hadzibabic. The text and images on ITAMP's YouTube channel are intended for public access and educational use. This material is owned or held by the President and Fellows of Harvard College. It is being provided solely for the purpose of teaching or individual research or enrichment. Any other use, including commercial reuse, mounting on other systems, or other forms of redistribution requires permission. ITAMP is supported through grants by the National Science Foundation Any opinions, findings and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s).

Zoom through the Galaxy and tour the planets

National Museum of Natural History
© Smithsonian Institution Animations courtesy NASA/GSFC The atmosphere has been changing since Earth began. Once living things evolved the ability to carry out photosynthesis, perhaps 2.7 billion years ago, they began to remake the atmosphere. Explore the invisible envelope that surrounds us and see how our changing atmosphere is unique within our Galaxy. Learn more about our atmosphere by visiting the online exhibition, Change is in the Air at: http://forces.si.edu/atmosphere
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