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Found 1,739 Collections

 

Cultural Expressions: Art for Social Change

This collection features civic engagement, language arts, and visual arts activities using posters from the Division of Community Education of Puerto Rico (DIVEDCO). This Puerto Rican Poster Art was inspired by works created during Works Progress Administration (WPA). Scaled bilingual activities for grades 2-5, 6-8, and 9-12.

Smithsonian Latino Center (SLC)
6
 

Mexican Art & U.S. History: Carmen Lomas Garza

This collection will provide an opportunity for students to analyze artwork, read background information, and connect art with historical events. At the heart of this activity is artwork created by Latino artist Carmen Lomas Garza. These paintings reflect the experiences of Garza's family and Latino life in 1980s America. In addition to image analysis, teachers could extend an opportunity for students to identify and discuss connections between Garza's art and the Mexican American experience from the 1960s to the present. This collection includes:

  • A timeline of U.S.-Mexican American relations
  • Video/audio of Reagan signing the 1986 Immigration Reform Control Act
  • And an overview of immigration reform via ABC-CLIO (requires subscription). 

#ethnicstudies #LISDSS

24A describe how the characteristics of and issues in U.S. history have been reflected in various genres of art, music, film, and literature;

Amanda Blake
24
 

Quill Art videos

Athabascan peoples harvested porcupine to eat and also carefully processed its quills into a fine material to beautify special items. Some artists continue to use quill in their work. In 2013, the Smithsonian Arctic Studies Center in Alaska hosted the Dene Quill Art project, bringing together Athabascan artists Shirley May Holmberg and Emma Hildbrand with ethnographic Nancy Fonicello conservator  to share quillwork techniques and develop new ones by studying historic museum pieces. They shared their expertise with students, museum visitors and local Alaska Native artists, along with conservators who learned how to better care for quillwork objects in museum collections. The video set presented here introduces participants and provides detailed demonstrations of how to work with quill from cleaning and dying, to sewing, wrapping folding and weaving. Links to a selection of Alaska Native objects from the Smithsonian collections made with porcupine quill are included below.

Tags: Alaska, Native art, Alaska Native, Indigenous, Athabascan, Dene, museum, education, Indigenous, quill, porcupine, conservator, Smithsonian Arctic Studies Center in Alaska

Smithsonian Arctic Studies Center in Alaska
14
 

New Almaden quicksilver mine

This collection is a resource for those interested in the history and science of mercury mining at New Almaden quicksilver mine. (more to come)

Daniel LaFlash
10
 

Circular Objects

Circular objects for viewing and inspiration

Heather Hammond
15
 

Circles of Fun: Hula Hooping

I created this collection for families to do together while schools are closed. I will be making a collection a day while we are out of school. Today we will be exploring hula hoops. The idea is for families to look at the items in the collection and consider what they see in the objects and paintings, what they think, and what they wonder. Families can also watch a free Brainpop video about Oprah (the reader), read articles about hula hoop history, and watch hoop dances performed by native people. At the end of the collection I have provided a few ideas for families about what to do next.

If you want to learn more about more about See Think Wonder you can click here to see a video of a teacher using the routine in her classroom.

Ellen Rogers
21
 

Salmon Give Life: Learning from Alaska’s First Peoples

There are five species of salmon in Alaska, and they are a vital food source for people living a subsistence lifestyle today and in the past. Alaska Natives determined that salmon skin, carefully processed, was a durable and waterproof material for clothing, and they used it to make bags, boots, mittens and parkas. Some artists continue to use this material in their work. The curriculum below consists of five activity-based lessons and will teach students about subsistence, with a focus on salmon, and how Alaska Natives utilize local resources to survive and thrive. The two videos referred to in curriculum Lesson 3 are provided below and are part of a 10-video set on this site in the Community Videos section, titled Sewing Salmon videos.

Tags: Alaska, Alaska Native, Indigenous, salmon, subsistence, traditional ecological knowledge, salmon skin, museum, museum objects, artifacts, Smithsonian Arctic Studies Center in Alaska

Smithsonian Arctic Studies Center in Alaska
7
 

Sewing Salmon videos

The Sewing Salmon project was hosted by the Smithsonian Institution’s Arctic Studies Center at the Anchorage Museum in Alaska and brought together three contemporary Alaska Native artists: Audrey Armstrong (Koyukon Athabascan), Coral Chernoff (Sugpiaq) and Marlene Nielsen (Yup'ik). Together they learned and taught about creating work from salmon skin through studying historic museum objects and through sharing and comparing techniques they developed. Each artist has a commitment to this almost-lost art and shared their knowledge with students and visitors, and with curators and conservators who care for museum collections. The video set presented here introduces the artists and their techniques. Links to a selection of Alaska Native objects from the Smithsonian collections made from salmon skin are included below.

Tags: Alaska, Native art, museum, education, Indigenous, sew, salmon, fish skin, Athabascan, Sugpiaq, Alutiiq, Yup'ik, Iñupiaq, Smithsonian Arctic Studies Center in Alaska

Smithsonian Arctic Studies Center in Alaska
15
 

Sharing the Dena'ina Language

The Alaska Office of the Smithsonian Arctic Studies Center hosted a seminar with the Dena’ina Language Institute in 2010 at the Anchorage Museum. Elders Helen Dick and Gladys Evanoff shared their knowledge about Dena'ina heritage objects in the Smithsonian collections, using the objects as tools to teach the Dena'ina Athabascan language. They worked with language learners Karen Evanoff, Aaron Leggett and Michelle Ravenmoon and with linguists James Kari and D. Roy Mitchell to script and record new language learning videos, including the three videos presented here. Links to the museum objects discussed are included below. 

Tags: Dena'ina, Athabascan, Indigenous, language, Alaska Native, dog pack, fire bag, snowshoes, Smithsonian Arctic Studies Center in Alaska

Smithsonian Arctic Studies Center in Alaska
7
 

Athabascan Moosehide Tanning & Sewing videos

Older generations of Alaska Athabascan (Dene) peoples tanned moose hides using time-tested methods to make strong, supple leather for sewing beaded or quill-embroidered tunics, jackets, mittens, bags and moccasins, as well as everyday essentials such as dogsled harnesses. Because traditional tanning is time-consuming and requires technical knowledge that has declined in recent generations, most moose hides are now sent out to commercial tanneries for processing with synthetic chemicals. Commercial tanning produces a lower quality hide, but more importantly, it displaces the passing on of Athabascan tanning knowledge. Recognizing this, contemporary artists Joel Isaak (Dena'ina Athabascan) and Melissa Shaginoff (Ahtna Athabascan) have been learning traditional methods for tanning moose hides from elders Helen Dick (Dena’ina Athabascan) and Jeanie Maxim (Ahtna Athabascan) and adding tested, contemporary tools. 

The Alaska office of the Arctic Studies Center worked with these committed artists and elders from September 2017 through June 2018 to carry out moosehide tanning work in communities and backyards in Kenai, Chickaloon, and Anchorage, and a sewing and beading residency at the Anchorage Museum. The collaboration resulted in the set of twenty-three educational videos presented here. Links to a selection of Athabascan objects from the Smithsonian collections made from moose hide are included below.

Tags: Alaska, Native art, museum, education, Indigenous, tan, tanning, moosehide, moose hide, smoking, sew, bead, Athabascan, Dena'ina, Ahtna, Dene, Melissa Shaginoff, Joel Isaak , Smithsonian Arctic Studies Center in Alaska

Smithsonian Arctic Studies Center in Alaska
32
 

Art, Creative Writing, and Public Speaking: A Portraiture Workshop for the ELL Classroom

Art, Creative Writing, and Public Speaking: A Portraiture Workshop for the ELL Classroom

This collection includes instructions and documentation of a replicable art-based program for English Language Learners (ELLs). The information included can be adapted for high school students and speakers of any language, including native English speakers. Activities were designed to foster in participants important skills such as visual literacy, public speaking, creative writing, art appreciation, collaborative learning, and advocacy, and also to develop empathy, confidence, and self-esteem. 

Keywords: ESL, ESOL, portraits, migration, immigration, stories, identity, monologues

#NPGteach

Philippa Rappoport
51
 

The American Story - Thankgiving, Pocahontas, Little Bighorn

Resources to virtually accompany "Telling the American Story", an exhibit of the Museum of the American Indian. Three events are explored: the first Thankgiving, Pocahantas, and the Battle of Little Big Horn.

#TUTEACH

Carey Churchill
10
 

The Great Inca Civilization

This collection gathers teaching resources on Inca architecture and civilization.

#TUTeach

jwaggo1
27
 

Fascinating Wampanoag Artifacts

A collection of interesting artifacts from the Wampanoag culture aligned with the 4th grade Social Studies curriculum. #TUTeach

Dominic Orino
11
 

May the Road Rise Up to Meet You: St. Patty's Day Fun

I created this collection for families to do together while schools are closed. I will be making a collection a day while we are out of school. Today we will be exploring St. Patrick's Day. The idea is for families to look at the items in the collection and consider what they see in the objects and paintings, what they think, and what they wonder. Families can also watch a free Brainpop video about St. Patrick's Day, read articles about magic folk, and listen to the read aloud Rainbow Fish. At the end of the collection I have provided a few ideas for families about what to do next.

If you want to learn more about more about See Think Wonder you can click here to see a video of a teacher using the routine in her classroom.

Ellen Rogers
39
 

Transportation in America

#tuteach

Kelly Herndon
37
 

National History Day: Freedom Rides

This collection brings together EDSITEment and Smithsonian resources to support the initial research into a project for National History Day.  While originally created for the 2017 theme, "Taking a Stand in History," resources found in this collection are useful for researching other National History Day themes.

Resources in this collection - portraits, artifacts, photographs, and an article - are compiled to supplement the American Experience Film, Freedom Riders. The Freedom Riders were civil rights activists who, in 1961, rode interstate buses to the segregated Southern U.S. to challenge the non-enforcement of Supreme Court decisions that ruled segregated buses unconstitutional. This collection is part of the larger collection, Taking a Stand: African American Civil Rights Movement. When navigating this collection, please see the standalone text tile for a summary of collection resources.

By no means is this collection comprehensive; instead, it provides a launching point for further research.

This collection was created in collaboration with the Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access.

Tags: sncc; student nonviolent coordinating committee; congress of racial equality; freedom ride; national national endowment for the humanities; #nhd; #NHD2017

EDSITEment
19
 

National History Day: NAACP & "Birth of a Nation"

This collection brings together EDSITEment and Smithsonian resources to support the initial research into a project for National History Day.  While originally created for the 2017 theme, "Taking a Stand in History," resources found in this collection are useful for researching other National History Day themes.

Resources in this collection - portraits, artifacts, photographs, and an article - supplement the EDSITEment lesson plan, Birth of a Nation, the NAACP, and the Balancing of Rights, which discusses the connection between the rise of the NAACP and their protests of the 1915 propaganda film Birth of a Nation. This collection is part of the larger collection, Taking a Stand: African American Civil Rights Movement. When navigating this collection, please see the standalone text tile for a summary of collection resources.

By no means is this collection comprehensive; instead, it provides a launching point for further research.

This collection was created in collaboration with the Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access.

Tags: kkk; national association for the advancement of colored people; moorfield storey; w. e. b. du bois; racism; national national endowment for the humanities; #nhd; #NHD2017

EDSITEment
24
 

National History Day: Brown v. Board

This collection brings together EDSITEment and Smithsonian resources to support the initial research into a project for National History Day.  While originally created for the 2017 theme, "Taking a Stand in History," resources found in this collection are useful for researching other National History Day themes.

Resources in this collection - articles, website, portraits, objects, and more - focus on Brown v. Board of Education, a landmark Supreme Court case that declared segregation in public schools unconstitutional. This collection is part of the larger collection, Taking a Stand: African American Civil Rights Movement. When navigating this collection, please see the standalone text tile for a summary of collection resources.

By no means is this collection comprehensive; instead, it provides a launching point for further research.

This collection was created in collaboration with EDSITEment, a website for K-12 educators from the National Endowment for the Humanities.

Tags: integration; thurgood marshall; little rock nine; topeka; kansas; racism; NAACP; national national endowment for the humanities; #nhd; #NHD2017

EDSITEment
18
 

National History Day: African American Civil Rights Movement

This collection brings together EDSITEment and Smithsonian resources to support the initial research into a project for National History Day.  While originally created for the 2017 theme, "Taking a Stand in History," resources found in this collection are useful for researching other National History Day themes.

These resources - photographs, objects, films, lesson plans, articles and more - pinpoint milestones in the African American Civil Rights Movement. Section topics include: NAACP & Birth of a Nation; the Scottsboro Boys; Brown vs. Board; Freedom Rides; the Selma to Montgomery March; and additional figures and events in the African American Civil Rights Movement. Each section is introduced with a standalone text tile that summarizes the resources held within the section. The first, third, and fourth section summaries are followed by a link out to a sub-collection of resources containing additional Smithsonian resources on these topics.

By no means is this collection comprehensive; instead, it provides a launching point for further research.

This collection was created in collaboration with the Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access.

Tags: segregation; racism; national association for the advancement of colored people; equality; national endowment for the humanities; #nhd; #NHD2017

EDSITEment
73
 

Mosquito! Podcasting Module

In this modular, multi-part lesson, learners will focus on a Sidedoor podcast discussing mosquitoes. Learners will focus on the content the podcast is delivering and then analyze the podcast for production techniques. The content of the podcast will give the team a base understanding for the focus of their own podcast.

#YAGSidedoor2019

Smithsonian Science Education Center
7
 

Investigating the Layers of a Korean Buddhist Sculpture

This Learning Lab Collection focuses on a single Buddhist object from Korea. Students will formulate questions about a Buddhist work of art from Korea using Project Zero's Layers Visible Thinking Routine.  They will investigate answers to their questions by researching the exhibition website and engaging with various interactives and digital resources provided.  

#AsiaTeachers
Tags:  Art; Buddhism; Korea; Project Zero; research; National Museum of Korea


About the exhibition:

Sacred Dedication:  A Korean Buddhist Masterpiece
September 21, 2019–March 22, 2020
Arthur M. Sackler Gallery

A single object—a beautiful gilt wood sculpture of Gwaneum, the bodhisattva of compassion and the most popular deity in Korean Buddhism—is the focus of this loan exhibition from the National Museum of Korea. Carved in the late Goryeo period (918–1392), this crowned image is now known to be the oldest surviving gilded wood figure in an informal pose. Its posture, with one leg raised and the other lowered, is associated with the deity’s dwelling place, where he sits calmly on rocks above the crashing waves of the sea. The same subject in a similar pose was common in devotional paintings, such as the hanging scroll of Suwol Gwaneum bosal (Water-Moon Avalokiteshvara) now in the collection of the Freer Gallery.

Sacred texts and potent symbolic objects were sealed inside this hollow religious sculpture when it was first placed into worship in the thirteenth century. The practice of adding dedication material to a Buddhist sculpture during consecration ceremonies was believed to transform it into a living body. Recent research conducted by the National Museum of Korea provides new information about this rare sculpture, its hidden contents, and the special rituals that surrounded image consecration in Korea centuries ago.

We thank our colleagues at the National Museum of Korea for sharing their research and facilitating this exhibition.

Freer and Sackler Galleries
11
 

Our World By Design

Our World by Design highlights objects from Cooper Hewitt's 2018 ad campaign. Each object brings awareness to the critical role design plays in enabling people to engage and interact in the world.

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
18
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