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Found 1,508 Collections

 

Art & Resistance: Frederick Douglass

Why resistance?  

  • My rationale for centering our IB Literature 1A study on the concept of resistance was born from conversations with students last year that revealed their false beliefs that enslaved people (specifically the kidnapped and enslaved Africans trafficked and sold into the American Slave Trade) did not by and large resist.  There was large scale ignorance across all my IB Literature classes of the scale of acts of resistance as well. Additionally,I thought since my students are developmentally at a stage of differentiation (often looking like resistance to norms) that they would find relevance and resonance with a unit centered on resistance.


Why use visual text?

  • Students reported being visual learners & expressed the desire to study various text (spoken/ written/ visual)
  • Art is not just a reflection of life. Art is life.  As such, art implicitly and/ or explicitly conveys the social mores of the time. 


Why use racist images?

  • Art is not just a reflection of life. Art is life.  As such, art implicitly and/ or explicitly conveys the social mores of the time. These images provide historical context.
  • A unit on resistance must include an investigation of agency. In social science, agency is the capacity of individuals to act independently and to make their own free choices. By contrast, structure is those factors of influence (such as social class, religion, gender, ethnicity, ability, customs, etc.) that determine or limit an agent and their decisions.


Why use Frederick Douglass images?

  • Controlling one’s image in the face of oppression that includes but is not limited to counter narratives, pseudo-science and stereotypes may be considered an act of resistance
  • It is ironic that Frederick Douglass, a formerly enslaved person, is arguably the most photographed American of the 19th century.  He carefully curated his image in photos as an act of resistance against anti-black and racist stereotypes of his time. 



Sher Anderson Petty
30
 

National History Day: Abolitionists (created by Tess Porter)

This collection brings together EDSITEment and Smithsonian resources to support the initial research into a project for National History Day.  While originally created for the 2017 theme, "Taking a Stand in History," resources found in this collection are useful for researching other National History Day themes.

These resources - including portraits, articles, primary source documents, videos, and websites - highlight four abolitionists profiled in American Experience film The Abolitionists and the National Youth Summit on Abolition: William Lloyd Garrison, Frederick Douglass, Harriet Beecher Stowe, and John Brown. Additional resources related to abolitionism and other important abolitionists are located at the end. When navigating this collection, please see the standalone text tiles for summaries of section resources.

By no means is this collection comprehensive; instead, it provides a launching point for further research.

This collection was created in collaboration with EDSITEment, a website for K-12 educators from the National Endowment for the Humanities.

Tags: civil war; slavery; underground railroad; african-american; national endowment for the humanities; #nhd; #NHD2017

Sher Anderson Petty
73
 

Learning about the Unconstitutional Deportation of American Citizens in the 1930s through an Individual's Experience: Emilia Castañeda

This collection includes a video interview and testimonial with Emilia Castañeda (April 10, 1926). Castañeda was a young Mexican American girl when she and her family were forced to leave their home and deported to Mexico from the United States in the 1930s. The interview includes a first-hand account of the impact of the federal government's forced removal of Mexican Americans.

Complementary resources to the short film include: Smithsonian Libraries' graphic organizers for evaluating historical sources, a Smithsonian Folklife and Cultural Heritage guide to conducting an oral history, and additional articles, videos and podcast files highlighting this history.

Use this collection as an extension to the LA Plaza de Cultura y Artes' collection, Unconstitutional Deportation of American Citizens in the 1930s. *This collection was created to support Unit 1: Intersectionality of Economic, Politics and Policy, Judicial Issues of the Austin ISD Ethnic Studies Part B course.

#EthnicStudies #BecauseOfHerStory

This Smithsonian Learning Lab collection received Federal support from the Latino and Asian Pacific American Initiatives Pool, administered by the Smithsonian Latino Center and the Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center. 

Keywords: unconstitutional deportation, Mexican Americans, repatriation, Great Depression, close listening


Ashley Naranjo
20
 

NHD at NMAAHC Collection: Breaking Barriers in History

Welcome to the National Museum of African American History and Culture's Collection Connection Grid for National History Day 2020! Below is an assortment of selected documents, images, objects and videos that highlight the African American experience in relation to the 2020 NHD theme: Breaking Barriers in History. Use these items as inspiration for a project topic, or use the items to help expand your research on a topic you have already selected.  This collection is designed to be self-guided by students and educators participating in National History Day.

 #NHD2020

Keywords: African American, NMAAHC, National History Day, NHD, Collection, Connection, Grid, breaking, barriers, history, project, topic, ideas, 2020

NMAAHC Education
66
 

Artful Animals: Leadership

What traits make a good leader? What can we learn about ourselves by looking at our relationship with animals? This student activity explores these questions through animal symbolism in African art, focusing on an embroidered Fante “Cloth of the Great.” Includes multiple objects, short-answer questions, an mp3 of a folktale read aloud, and a creative writing activity.

Tag: Africa

This collection was created to support the 2016 CCSSO Teachers of the Year Day at the Smithsonian.
Deborah Stokes
14
 

Getting Started with Design Thinking

This collection allows students and teachers to gain an understanding of the Design Thinking process utilizing Cooper Hewitt learning lab resources as well other materials. 

#designthinking

Mary Marotta
48
 

Analyzing an Oral History Interview: Luis Jimenez

This collection includes an oral history interview clip from the Smithsonian Archives of American Art, with Mexican American artist Luis Jimenez (July 30, 1940-June 13, 2006) from Texas. Students can use the oral history to explore the essential question: What is the purpose and value of oral histories in relation to understanding immigration issues?  A complementary teacher guide from the Blanton Museum of Art (Austin, TX) is available here: https://blantonmuseum.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/08/Critical-Analysis.pdf. Additional resources to the audio file include: Smithsonian Libraries' graphic organizers for evaluating historical sources, a Smithsonian Folklife and Cultural Heritage guide to conducting an oral history, and additional artworks, photographs, and videos highlighting Jimenez's life.

#EthnicStudies *This collection was created to support Unit 2: Culture and Resistance, oral history project assignment of the Austin ISD Ethnic Studies Part B course.

This Smithsonian Learning Lab collection received Federal support from the Latino and Asian Pacific American Initiatives Pool, administered by the Smithsonian Latino Center and the Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center. 

Keywords: family history, sculptor, close listening, vaquero

Ashley Naranjo
18
 

Breaking Barriers: Innovation and Industry

This collection brings together EDSITEment and Smithsonian resources to support the initial research into a project for National History Day 2020, "Breaking Barriers in History."

These resources—including, objects, photographs, portraits, lesson plans, and articles—explore how technologies developed in the interest of advancing industrialization during the United States’ Second Industrial Revolution made it possible to overcome economic and social barriers, while, in some cases, unintentionally creating new ones. Innovators who developed technologies and tools to make every day living easier and more enjoyable, along with transportation technologies that broke barriers in terms of travel and movement, are also included in this collection. Users are also asked to consider the legacies of these inventions and their significance to innovation and industrialization through to today. The second resource of this collection contains questions to help with the analysis of a chosen topic alongside photograph, document, artwork, portrait, and object resources. 

By no means is this collection comprehensive; instead, it provides a launching point for further research.

This collection was created in collaboration with the Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access.

Share your National History Day collections and let us know what you think! Write to us on Twitter: @EDSITEment and @SmithsonianLab, #NHD2020. If you publish a collection on your National History Day topic, be sure to enter #NHD2020 in the description!

Tags: factory, industry, invention, innovator, Thomas Edison, Nikola Tesla, Alexander Graham Bell, Samuel F. B. Morse, telegraph, Christopher Latham Sholes, typewriter, telephone, communication, technology, workers, labor, International Ladies Garment Workers Union, David Dubinsky, Asa Philip Randolph, John Llewellyn Lewis, Frances Perkins, Samuel Gompers, strike, boycott, union, Transcontinental, railroad, nineteenth century, 19th, twentieth, 20th, #NHD

EDSITEment
98
 

Breaking Barriers: United Farm Workers

This collection brings together EDSITEment and Smithsonian resources to support the initial research into a project for National History Day 2020, "Breaking Barriers in History."

These resources—including photographs, objects, portraits, lesson plans, and articles—explore how the United Farm Workers, and leaders Cesar Chavez, Dolores Huerta, and Larry Itliong, organized for worker and civil rights during the 1960s and 70s. Resources address how groups and individuals sought to bring attention to the mistreatment of farmers—particularly Chicano and Filipino workers—the barriers they sought to break, and the reforms they fought to establish through artistic expression, as well as organized boycotts and strikes. The second resource of this collection contains questions to help with the analysis of a chosen topic alongside photograph, document, artwork, portrait, and object resources. 

By no means is this collection comprehensive; instead, it provides a launching point for further research.

This collection was created in collaboration with the Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access.

Share your National History Day collections and let us know what you think! Write to us on Twitter: @EDSITEment and @SmithsonianLab, #NHD2020. If you publish a collection on your National History Day topic, be sure to enter #NHD2020 in the description!

Tags: UFW, Latino, Hispanic, California, Fred Ross, art, grapes, lettuce, farmers, immigration, citizenship, labor, laborers, workers, unions, protest, twentieth century, 20th, #NHD

EDSITEment
66
 

Breaking Barriers: Women's Suffrage

This collection brings together EDSITEment and Smithsonian resources to support the initial research into a project for National History Day 2020, "Breaking Barriers in History."

These resources—including photographs, objects, portraits, lesson plans, and articles—explore how women during the 19th and 20th centuries organized, petitioned, marched, and spoke out for the removal of barriers to full voting rights for women. While the 19th Amendment was passed in 1920, the extent to which this law led to equity for all women remains a point of debate. Resources address how groups and individuals sought to bring attention to the disenfranchisement of women, highlight the often overlooked perspectives and actions of women of color during the suffrage movement, and offer insight into the legacy of the suffrage movement on the larger fights for women’s and civil rights. The second resource of this collection contains questions to help with the analysis of a chosen topic alongside photograph, document, artwork, portrait, and object resources. 

By no means is this collection comprehensive; instead, it provides a launching point for further research.

This collection was created in collaboration with the Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access.

Share your National History Day collections and let us know what you think! Write to us on Twitter: @EDSITEment and @SmithsonianLab, #NHD2020. If you publish a collection on your National History Day topic, be sure to enter #NHD2020 in the description!

Tags: voting, protest, African American, Mary Church Terrell, Ida B. Wells, Belva Ann Lockwood, Sojourner Truth, Mary McLeod Bethune, Anna Julia Cooper, Jeannette Pickering Rankin, Victoria Woodhull, Wyoming, Suffragette, Suffragist, Fannie Lou Hamer, Felisa Rincón de Gautier, Zitkala-Ša, Susette LaFlesche Tibbles, Alice Paul, ERA, civil rights, women’s rights, Edith Mayo, protest, boycott, twentieth century, 20th, #NHD

EDSITEment
79
 

Breaking Barriers: Reconstruction

This collection brings together EDSITEment and Smithsonian resources to support the initial research into a project for National History Day 2020, "Breaking Barriers in History."

These resources—including photographs, primary source documents, portraits, lesson plans, and articles—explore the efforts of individuals and groups to overcome racial, economic, and political barriers during the era immediately following the Civil War known as Reconstruction. Resources highlight influential individuals and groups, the intentional and unintentional consequences of actions and policies that resulted in the construction of new barriers for some, and competing perspectives over the best path toward reuniting the United States after the Civil War. The second resource in this collection contains questions to help with the analysis of a chosen topic alongside photograph, document, artwork, portrait, and object resources. 

By no means is this collection comprehensive; instead, it provides a launching point for further research.

This collection was created in collaboration with the Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access.

Share your National History Day collections and let us know what you think! Write to us on Twitter: @EDSITEment and @SmithsonianLab, #NHD2020. If you publish a collection on your National History Day topic, be sure to enter #NHD2020 in the description!

Tags: civil rights, slavery, Freedman’s Bureau, U.S. Bureau of Freedmen Refugees and Abandoned Lands, Fisk Jubilee Singers, African American, Emancipation Proclamation, Abraham Lincoln, Andrew Johnson, Sojourner Truth, South Carolina, Congress, House of Representatives, Frederick Douglass, Robert Smalls, Hiram R. Revels, Benjamin S. Turner , Robert C. De Large, Josiah T. Walls, Jefferson F. Long, Joseph H. Rainey, R. Brown Elliot, Thomas Mundy Peterson, Sidney Taliaferro, John Roy Lynch, Octavius Catto, Edmonia Lewis, Laura Smith Haviland, John W. Menard, Harper’s Weekly, Oliver Otis Howard, William T. Sherman, Howard University, W.E.B. Du Bois, nineteenth century, 19th, Washington, D.C., #NHD

EDSITEment
78
 

National History Day: Art and World War I

This collection brings together EDSITEment and Smithsonian resources to support the initial research into a project for National History Day.  While originally created for the 2018 theme, "Conflict and Compromise in History," resources found in this collection are useful for researching other National History Day themes. 

These resources - including artworks, handwritten memoirs, lesson plans, and articles  - help explore World War I (1914-1918) through artwork created by soldiers and other individuals involved in the Great War.  Collection highlights artists Horace Pippin (a member of the Harlem Hellfighters), Claggett Wilson, William James Aylward, and Harvey Thomas Dunn.  Other important artists and artworks, as well as additional information on World War I, is located at the end. The second tile of this collection contains questions to help with the analysis of photograph, document, artwork, portrait and object resources. The third tile contains a graphic organizer, created by National History Day, to help explore historical context and the "Conflict and Compromise in History" theme.

By no means is this collection comprehensive; instead, it provides a launching point for further research.

This collection was created in collaboration with EDSITEment, a website for K-12 educators from the National Endowment for the Humanities.

Tags: wwi; ww1; world war 1; soldier; military; perspective; witness;  african american; artist; artwork; 20th century; 1900s; national endowment for the humanities; nhd; #NHD2018 #NHD

EDSITEment
75
 

National History Day: World War I

This collection brings together EDSITEment and Smithsonian resources to support the initial research into a project for National History Day.  While originally created for the 2019 theme, "Triumph and Tragedy in History," resources found in this collection are useful for researching other National History Day themes.  

These resources - including photographs, letters, artwork, lesson plans, and articles - explore the costs and consequences of America’s involvement in World War I and its complex legacies in the decades following. Resources highlight Woodrow Wilson and his foreign policy, the roles of African American soldiers during and after the war, artwork by soldiers and government-sponsored artists depicting the psychological effects of the battlefield, letters written by soldiers to those back home, the physical costs of war and the triumphs of medical innovation, and the sinking of the RMS Lusitania, which resulted in the deaths of 1,198 civilians. The second tile of this collection contains questions to help with the analysis of photograph, document, artwork, portrait, and object resources. 

By no means is this collection comprehensive; instead, it provides a launching point for further research.

This collection was created in collaboration with Tess Porter at the SmithsonianLab.

Share your National History Day collections and let us know what you think! Write to us on Twitter: @EDSITEment & @SmithsonianLab, #NHD2019. If you publish a collection on your National History Day topic, be sure to enter #NHD2019 in the description!

Tags: the great war, wwi, ww1, world war one, world war 1, military, perspective, 20th century, 1900s, american expeditionary forces, aef, woodrow wilson, buffalo soldiers, 92nd infantry division, 93rd infantry division, african-american, black, harlem hellfighters, art, horace pippin, claggett wilson, harvey thomas dunn, william james aylward, anna coleman ladd, prosthetic, rms lusitania, postcard, form letter, #NHD

EDSITEment
82
 

National History Day: The Mexican Revolution

This collection brings together EDSITEment and Smithsonian resources to support the initial research into a project for National History Day.  While originally created for the 2018 theme, "Conflict and Compromise in History," resources found in this collection are useful for researching other National History Day themes. 

These resources - including primary source newspaper articles, recorded symposiums, lesson plans, and artwork - help explore the complexity and impact of the Mexican Revolution (c. 1910-1920). Resources highlight Pancho Villa, US-Mexico relations, and the artistic movements that rose out of the Revolution.  The second tile of this collection contains questions to help with the analysis of photograph, document, artwork, portrait and object resources. The third tile contains a graphic organizer, created by National History Day, to help explore historical context and the "Conflict and Compromise in History" theme.

By no means is this collection comprehensive; instead, it provides a launching point for further research.

This collection was created in collaboration with EDSITEment, a website for K-12 educators from the National Endowment for the Humanities.

Tags: mexico; new spain; independence; revolutionary; encomienda; francisco pancho villa; emiliano zapata; agrarista; porfirio diaz; madero; woodrow wilson; 20th century; 1900s; national endowment for the humanities; nhd; #NHD #NHD2018

EDSITEment
31
 

National History Day: Origins of the U.S. Constitution

This collection brings together EDSITEment and Smithsonian resources to support the initial research into a project for National History Day.  While originally created for the 2018 theme, "Conflict and Compromise in History," resources found in this collection are useful for researching other National History Day themes. 

These resources - including lesson plans, portraits, digital exhibitions, and artwork - help explore how conflict and compromise led to the drafting and ratification of the U.S. Constitution, the Bill of Rights, and the Thirteenth Amendment. The second tile of this collection contains questions to help with both the analysis of this historical event and the analysis of different types of resources (photograph, document, artwork, portrait, and object). The third tile contains a graphic organizer, created by National History Day, to help explore historical context and the "Conflict and Compromise in History" theme.

By no means is this collection comprehensive; instead, it provides a launching point for further research. 

This collection was created in collaboration with EDSITEment, a website for K-12 educators from the National Endowment for the Humanities.

Tags: 1700s; 1800s; civil war; james madison; john jay; thomas jefferson; roger sherman; federalists anti-federalists debate; frederick douglass; abraham lincoln; slavery; anti-slavery; constitutional convention 1787; george washington; early democracy; national endowment for the humanities; nhd; #NHD; #NHD2018


EDSITEment
32
 

National History Day: Chinese Exclusion Act

This collection brings together EDSITEment and Smithsonian resources to support the initial research into a project for National History Day.  While originally created for the 2018 theme, "Conflict and Compromise in History," resources found in this collection are useful for researching other National History Day themes. 

These resources - including digital exhibitions, photographs, documents, and lesson plans - help explore the Chinese Exclusion Act (1882), a United States Federal Law restricting immigration of all Chinese laborers and the first law implemented to prevent a specific ethnic group from immigrating to the United States.  Resources highlight the lives of Chinese-American families and racism in American advertisements from the Act's enactment to its repeal in 1943. The second tile of this collection contains questions to help with the analysis of photograph, document, artwork, portrait and object resources. The third tile contains a graphic organizer, created by National History Day, to help explore historical context and the "Conflict and Compromise in History" theme.

By no means is this collection comprehensive; instead, it provides a launching point for further research.

This collection was created in collaboration with EDSITEment, a website for K-12 educators from the National Endowment for the Humanities.

Tags: prejudice, discrimination; immigration; china; asia; asian; chinese-american; asian-american; 19th century; 1800s; 20th century; 1900s; national endowment for the humanities; apa; asian pacific american; nhd; #NHD2018; #NHD; #APA2018

EDSITEment
47
 

National History Day: American Immigrant Experiences

This collection brings together EDSITEment and Smithsonian resources to support the initial research into a project for National History Day.  While originally created for the 2019 theme, "Triumph and Tragedy in History," resources found in this collection are useful for researching other National History Day themes.  

These resources - including objects, documents, websites, and articles - reveal challenges and opportunities experienced by American immigrants in the 19th to mid-20th centuries.  Resources highlight hardships that compelled people to leave their homelands, difficulties immigrants faced upon arrival, and ways they overcame obstacles to build new lives and communities in America.  The second tile of this collection contains questions to help with the analysis of photograph, document, artwork, portrait, and object resources. 

The history of immigration in America is an immense topic, and this collection addresses only aspects of it.  Use this collection to brainstorm project topics, find connected resources, and as a launching point for further research.

This collection was created in collaboration with EDSITEment, a website for K-12 educators from the National Endowment for the Humanities.

Share your National History Day collections and let us know what you think! Write to us on Twitter: @EDSITEment & @SmithsonianLab, #NHD2019. If you publish a collection on your National History Day topic, be sure to enter #NHD2019 in the description!

Tags: 1800s, 1900s angel island, ellis island, immigration test, community, prejudice, irish, jewish, syrian, lebanese, arab, italian, mexican, german, greek, bohemian, czech, slovenian, know nothing, triangle shirtwaist factory fire, swedish, chinese exclusion act, japanese american incarceration, internment, bracero program, stories project, #NHD

EDSITEment
128
 

National History Day: The Vietnam War

This collection brings together EDSITEment and Smithsonian resources to support the initial research into a project for National History Day.  While originally created for the 2018 theme, "Conflict and Compromise in History," resources found in this collection are useful for researching other National History Day themes. 

These resources - including protest posters, archival photographs, interviews, artwork, and articles - explore the topic of the Vietnam War from multiple perspectives. Resources highlight politics, the experience of soldiers, anti-war protests, and artwork created in reaction to the Vietnam War. The second tile of this collection contains questions to help with both the analysis of this historical event and the analysis of different types of resources (photograph, document, artwork, portrait, and object). The third tile contains a graphic organizer, created by National History Day, to help explore historical context and the "Conflict and Compromise in History" theme.

By no means is this collection comprehensive; instead, it provides a launching point for further research.

This collection was created in collaboration with EDSITEment, a website for K-12 educators from the National Endowment for the Humanities.

Tags: ho chi-minh; lyndon b. johnson; richard nixon; walter cronkite; henry kissinger; veteran; oral history; viet cong; protest; peace; 50s; 60s; 70s; 20th century; 1900s; national endowment for the humanities; nhd; #NHD2018 #NHD

EDSITEment
88
 

Seeking equality: A brief history of the American women's fight for political rights to match their civic contributions.

This learning lab provides the preface and context for an in-class SAAM presentation on the ideology of republican motherhood as it influenced women during the years 1770 to 1920.  This lesson seeks to answer two questions:

  • To what extent did American women embrace the ideology presented by  republican motherhood?
  • In what ways and to what extent did women find the ideology to be confining, and thus, challenge it?

Preparing for the lesson:

The night before the first lesson, students will:

  • Study the document Women’s Suffrage Postcard and respond to the Claim-Support-Question activity built into the document. Look for the paper clip icon in the upper left hand corner.
  • Read the article: How women’s history and civil rights came to the Smithsonian; be sure to read my annotation attached via the paper clip icon.
  • Watch Dr. Berkin’s short presentation on republican motherhood; craft your own definition of republican motherhood and post it in the text entry box under the paper clip icon.

Day 1 – Jigsaw Activity


The class will break into 4 groups, each becoming an expert on a particular aspect and era in which the women’s rights movement made strides. As you study the listed resources, on the note taking worksheet, record the ways women embodied the principles of republican motherhood. Additionally, note the ways in which they challenged this philosophy.

Once each group has completed their research, students will break into jigsaw groups through which they will share the resources they studied and their analysis of these resources. 

Day 2 – Video Conference with SAAM

Using artworks presented by  the Smithsonian American Art Museum and in conversation with a SAAM curator, students will analyze artworks from each era to extend their understanding of the ways through which women both accepted and challenged the ideology of republican motherhood.

Concluding activities (day 2 HW):

  • Study the Women’s Suffrage photography and respond to the Claim-Support-Question activity built into the document. Look for the paper clip icon in the upper left hand corner.
  • Read the article Women in World War I and the Time Magazine article How World War I helped women gain the right to vote; watch the two video excepts embedded in the Time article from PBS’s The Great War.
  • Study the photo / painting The Emancipation of Women, and synthesizing all of your knowledge, respond to the Claim-Support-Question activity built into the document. Look for the paper clip icon in the upper left hand corner.
Jill Stedman
21
 

NHD 2020: Breaking Barriers with American Art

This collection is designed to support teachers and students exploring the 2020 National History Day theme: Breaking Barriers in History. Included in this collection are five prospective topics aligned with the NHD theme, for each of which we have supplied American artworks that could be used as primary source texts and/or inspiration for further research.

How did the invention of photography break down the barrier between ordinary Americans and the battlefield during the Civil War? 

What barriers, both geographic and social, did the invention and expansion of the subway break for New Yorkers? 

How did James Van Der Zee's Harlem photography studio help a rising middle class African American community break barriers?

How have American Indians overcome barriers to tribal sovereignty, and what barriers still exist?

How did abstract painter Alma Thomas break gender and racial barriers in the art world?

#NHD2020 #NHD #BecauseOfHerStory

Phoebe Hillemann
55
 

Civil Rights Posters

Christina Ratatori
8
 

Snowboarding; Evolution of Sport, Products, and Culture

Investigating the evolution of Snowboarding as a transformative force in snow sport culture and professional athletics, a driver of product engineering and design, and a powerful voice for environmental stewardship that resonates with our youth.

Navigation North
13
 

Thanksgiving menu

MrsK Shealy
2
 

Thanksgiving--A Reflection of a Nation

A learning resource for students about Thanksgiving. The images in this collection are different portrayals of the United States holiday of Thanksgiving. They are grouped in order of publication from 1863 to 1994. As you look through them and complete the activities, think about these three key questions:
-How does the context in which the image is produced affect the result? Meaning, how does what is happening during the time period affect what kind of picture of Thanksgiving we see?
-What do the images say about our national identity: who is a welcome part of the United States? What do we celebrate in this country?
-Whose version of the Thanksgiving story is being told in these images?
Kate Harris
15
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