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Found 477 Collections

 

Prototyping

#designthinking

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
16
 

Design Camp 2018 - Week 3 | 6-8 yrs

Bits and Bots

Is your child curious about how things work? Campers will learn a variety of creative and technical skills to design their own multi-function robot. 

Project Partner | Generation Code

At Generation Code, it is our mission to transform students into digital leaders. Using curriculum co-created by educators and coders, we teach the skills needed for kids to advance technologically, creatively, and socially.

About Design Camp

Is your child a designer, tinkerer, or creative thinker? Cooper Hewitt Design Camp offers week-long immersions in the latest advances in design. Guest designers share their problem-solving strategies and engage campers in fun, real-life design challenges. Campers will receive special access to the museum’s permanent collection and enjoy exciting collaborations.

Why Cooper Hewitt Design Camp?

At Cooper Hewitt Design Camp, we equip students with the tools necessary to tackle age-appropriate challenges, work collaboratively, and think creatively.  Campers master a four-step design process—defining problems, generating ideas, prototyping/making, and testing/evaluating—through a series of fun exercises and design challenges.  Each project is carefully crafted to introduce children to design vocabulary, techniques, and processes unique to Cooper Hewitt and applicable to future school assignments and personal explorations.

#chdesigncamp

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
16
 

Design Camp 2018 - Week 3 | 9-10 yrs

Bits and Bots

Is your child curious about how things work? Campers will learn a variety of creative and technical skills to design their own multi-function robot. 

Project Partner | Generation Code

At Generation Code, it is our mission to transform students into digital leaders. Using curriculum co-created by educators and coders, we teach the skills needed for kids to advance technologically, creatively, and socially.    

About Design Camp

Is your child a designer, tinkerer, or creative thinker? Cooper Hewitt Design Camp offers week-long immersions in the latest advances in design. Guest designers share their problem-solving strategies and engage campers in fun, real-life design challenges. Campers will receive special access to the museum’s permanent collection and enjoy exciting collaborations.

 Why Cooper Hewitt Design Camp?

At Cooper Hewitt Design Camp, we equip students with the tools necessary to tackle age-appropriate challenges, work collaboratively, and think creatively.  Campers master a four-step design process—defining problems, generating ideas, prototyping/making, and testing/evaluating—through a series of fun exercises and design challenges.  Each project is carefully crafted to introduce children to design vocabulary, techniques, and processes unique to Cooper Hewitt and applicable to future school assignments and personal explorations.


#chdesigncamp


Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
16
 

Design Camp 2018 - Week 1 | 6-8 yrs

Week 1 | Places and Spaces

From soaring skyscrapers to sprawling parks, campers will be inspired to design using their environment as a guide. 

About Design Camp

Is your child a designer, tinkerer, or creative thinker? Cooper Hewitt Design Camp offers week-long immersions in the latest advances in design. Guest designers share their problem-solving strategies and engage campers in fun, real-life design challenges. Campers will receive special access to the museum’s permanent collection and enjoy exciting collaborations.

Learn more at cooperhewitt.org/designcamp

Why Cooper Hewitt Design Camp?

At Cooper Hewitt Design Camp, we equip students with the tools necessary to tackle age-appropriate challenges, work collaboratively, and think creatively. Campers master a four-step design process—defining problems, generating ideas, prototyping/making, and testing/evaluating—through a series of fun exercises and design challenges. Each project is carefully crafted to introduce children to design vocabulary, techniques, and processes unique to Cooper Hewitt and applicable to future school assignments and personal explorations.


#chdesigncamp

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
20
 

Design Camp 2018 - Week 1 | 9-10 yrs

Week 1 | Places and Spaces

From soaring skyscrapers to sprawling parks, campers will be inspired to design using their environment as a guide. 

About Design Camp

Is your child a designer, tinkerer, or creative thinker? Cooper Hewitt Design Camp offers week-long immersions in the latest advances in design. Guest designers share their problem-solving strategies and engage campers in fun, real-life design challenges. Campers will receive special access to the museum’s permanent collection and enjoy exciting collaborations.

Learn more at cooperhewitt.org/designcamp

Why Cooper Hewitt Design Camp?

At Cooper Hewitt Design Camp, we equip students with the tools necessary to tackle age-appropriate challenges, work collaboratively, and think creatively. Campers master a four-step design process—defining problems, generating ideas, prototyping/making, and testing/evaluating—through a series of fun exercises and design challenges. Each project is carefully crafted to introduce children to design vocabulary, techniques, and processes unique to Cooper Hewitt and applicable to future school assignments and personal explorations.


#chdesigncamp

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
18
 

2018 National High School Design Competition

This Learning Lab was created as a resource for students and teachers participating in the 2018 National High School Design Competition.

This year's competition challenges students to make the everyday accessible by considering a place, process, or object they regularly use, identifying a challenge that a user with a disability might have with it, and designing a solution that addresses that challenge and makes the place, process, or object more accessible for all.

For more details on the competition go to https://www.cooperhewitt.org/2...

#designthinking

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
44
 

Ideas to Solutions with Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum

How do you help students test their ideas in your classroom? A critical step in the design process, prototyping and testing ideas helps problem-solvers learn from failures, experiment with materials, and visualize their solutions. Educators will dive into a case study from Michael Graves Architecture and Design and explore various techniques to experiment with ideas in the classroom with resources from professional designers and Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum.

#NTOY18 #CHEDUCATION #CHDESIGNTHINKING

#designthinking

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
43
 

BabyLegs, 2017-2019

This collection explores BabyLegs, an open-source, affordable monitoring tool to study marine microplastic pollution featured in Nature-- Cooper Hewitt Design Triennial

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
9
 

Nature: Botanical Expressions

At the turn of the 20th century, the intersection of botanical study with design practice stimulated an array of plant forms and motifs in furnishings, glassware, ceramics, textiles, and more. Botanical Expressions reveals how designers, inspired by nature and informed by scientific knowledge, created vibrant new designs in America, Britain, France, and the Netherlands. Blossoming vases, plantlike stuctures, fanciful garden illustrations, and a diversity of vegetal and floral patterns reveal how nature and design dynamically merged.

An increasing number of designers, trained as botanists, advocated for the beauty and order of nature’s systems, colors, and patterns. Many manufacturers operated in proximity to gardens for natural study and stocked books of botanical illustrations as resources for their designers. These primary sources, on loan from Smithsonian Libraries, appear alongside the objects they influenced.

Since the 19th century, the garden was often seen as a refuge from industry and a natural source of plenty and pleasure. This history of botanical expressions in design illuminates a reflection on the critical role of nature within our world.

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
67
 

Earth Day: Highlights Collection

This is a Smithsonian Learning Lab topical collection, which contains images, text, recordings, and other multimedia resources that may complement the Tween Tribune feature, Are we living in the Plastic Age?. Use these resources to introduce or augment your study of this topic. If you want to personalize this collection by changing or adding content, click the Sign Up link above to create a free account.  If you are already logged in, click the copy button to initiate your own version. Learn more here

Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access
28
 

Identifying Bird Beak Types through Robert Ridgway's Drawings

Birds' beaks tell a lot about them, especially where they find their food and how they eat it. This collection includes a bird curator’s drawings that clearly show the different kinds of beaks, which evolved because they are good for breaking seeds, catching insects or filtering out shrimp or algae.

Keywords: scientific illustration, sketches

Ashley Naranjo
18
 

Cloudy With a Chance of Fun

I created this collection for families to do together while schools are closed. I will be making a collection a day while we are out of school. Today we will be exploring clouds. The idea is for families to look at the items in the collection and consider what they see in the objects and paintings, what they think, and what they wonder. Families can also watch a free Brainpop video about clouds, read articles about clouds, and listen to a read aloud called Brave Irene who faces some very interesting weather. At the end of the collection I have provided a few ideas for families about what to do next.

If you want to learn more about more about See Think Wonder you can click here to see a video of a teacher using the routine in her classroom.

Ellen Rogers
22
 

Women's History in America: Highlights Collections

In celebration of Women's History Month, this collections highlights some of the many accomplished and influential women in science, art, women's rights, and athletics throughout history. This is a Smithsonian Learning Lab topical collection, which contains images, text, recordings, and other multimedia resources that may complement Tween Tribune features for Women's History Month 2018:

 Use these resources to introduce or augment your study of this topic. If you want to personalize this collection by changing or adding content, click the Sign Up link above to create a free account.  If you are already logged in, click the copy button to initiate your own version. Learn more here

Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access
64
 

Water-Related Hazards: Hurricanes

This topical collection includes resources about water-related hazards and natural disasters, namely hurricanes. Includes examples from around the world and over time, including Hurricane Ike in Texas and the Greater Antilles, Hurricane Katrina in the Gulf Coast, and Hurricane Sandy in the Northeastern region of the United States. Finally, a lesson plan asking students to design a post-hurricane revitalization plan is included.
Ashley Naranjo
11
 

Earth Optimism Teen Conversations

The Earth Day Network describes the first Earth Day as a momentous event: On April 22, 1970, 20 million Americans — at the time, 10% of the total population of the United States — took to the streets, parks, and auditoriums to demonstrate for a healthy and sustainable environment in massive coast-to-coast rallies. Thousands of colleges and universities organized protests against the deterioration of the environment. https://www.earthday.org/history/.

In 2020, at the 50th anniversary of the first Earth Day, many argue that there is still much work to be done. This collection of objects and resources challenges teens nationwide to ask and discuss the questions: What will the legacy of Earth Day and the conversation movement be 50 years from now?  How will we get there?

Included in this collection are themes, prompts, and resources to help guide your conversations. Discussion prompts are included within each section title square.

National Museum of American History
80
 

The Wright Stuff: Flying the Wright Flyer

The birth of aeronautical engineering began in the Wright brothers' bike shop in Dayton, Ohio. The family tree of airplanes can be traced back to the Wright brothers' 1903 Flyer. The principles of flight that got the Wrights into the air are the same today. Join STEM in 30 as we investigate the principles of flight and how the Wright Flyer made it into the air and into the history books.

December 14, 2016

STEM in 30 at National Air and Space Museum
34
 

Life in the Snow World

Humans have many ways of coping with winter conditions: we can wear layers, warm ourselves by the fire, stay indoors, and even travel to warmer climates. Do animals and plants have ways of coping with winter conditions too? Indeed, many organisms that live in snowy regions have adapted over time to snowy conditions. Native animals and plants have special adaptations or behavior to help them survive life in the snow world. Photos and questions in this collection will help students to explore these unique adaptations. Simply click the paperclip in each image to see the prompts pertaining to each photo. This collection is ideal for an exploratory lesson.

Lake Tahoe Interpretation
14
 

guns and stuff used in the American revolution

a collection of guns

David Marchant
10
 

Humans and the Footprints We Leave: Smithsonian-Montgomery College Faculty Fellowship 2020 Opening Panel Resources

This collection serves as an introduction to the opening panel of the 2020 Smithsonian-Montgomery College Faculty Fellowship Program. This year's theme is “Humans and the Footprints We Leave: Climate Change and Other Critical Challenges." Three Smithsonian staff members will present at the session, including Igor Krupnik (Curator of Arctic and Northern Ethnology collections and Head of the Ethnology Division at the National Museum of Natural History), Alison Cawood (Citizen Science Coordinator at the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center), and Ashley Peery (Educator for the exhibition "Outbreak: Epidemics in a Connected World, " at the National Museum of Natural History). Their bios, presentation descriptions, and other resources are included inside.

As you explore these resources, be sure to jot down any questions you have for the presenters. It is sure to be a fascinating and fruitful seminar series!

#MCteach

Philippa Rappoport
16
 

Watersheds, Water Clarity & Human Impact on Lake Tahoe

Lake Tahoe has become a symbol of the controversial balance between preserving and expanding into natural systems. Tahoe’s clarity has also been decreasing since at least 1968; down from 100 feet of visibility to about 70 feet nowadays. Fine particles from urban expansion is one of the main causes, as well as the introduction of invasive species. These photos and questions will help students to understand some of the reasons why Tahoe is becoming murkier. They can provoke relevant ideas about how to slow that loss of clarity down or even reverse it, so that future generations of people and native species can enjoy and rely on this magnificent lake, just as we have done in the past. Simply click the paperclip in each image to see the prompts pertaining to each photo. This collection is ideal for a discussion-based lesson.

Lake Tahoe Interpretation
19
 

New Student Copy of Forgotten Elephants of Deep Time with Paleobiologist Advait Jukar

Program Details

  • December 12, 2019
  • Shows are ~45 minutes long and stream at 11am and 2pm ET
  • The program is free, but registration is requested.  

Overview

The earliest elephant relatives originated in Africa about 60 million years ago and dispersed to every continent on earth, except Antarctica and Australia. There are about 165  known elephant species from the fossil record, and scientists estimate that there would have been many more that we haven't found yet, over the whole history of this special group, called a clade. In Earth’s more recent history, between 50,000 and 40,000 years ago, there were 16 species of elephants and their relatives living at the same time around the world, including at least 7 in the United States. Today, there are only three species of elephants that remain: the African savannah elephant (Loxodonta africana), the African forest elephant (Loxodonta cyclotis), and the Asian elephant (Elephas maximus). Populations of all three species are declining, with Asian elephants at a much higher risk of extinction.

Today’s elephants are part of the order Proboscidea which consists of modern elephants and their extinct relatives such as mastodons, mammoths, and gomphotheres. All of the animals in this group have a proboscis, or trunk, that they use to eat and drink. While today there are only two surviving elephant genera, the African and Asian elephant, their evolutionary history is much more diverse.

Paleontologists use fossil elephant teeth to understand the animal’s diet and feeding behavior. There are two main types of teeth: high crowned and low-crowned teeth.

  • High-Crowned Teeth: Animals that consume tougher, more abrasive foods are likely to wear down their teeth over time, and thus have evolved to have higher-crowned teeth as a result. These animals typically have an herbivorous grazing diet; they graze grasses.
  • Low-Crowned Teeth: Animals that eat softer food have less wear, and therefore have low-crowned teeth. These animals typically have an herbivorous browsing diet; they browse branches, eating soft leaves.

Darlene Smith
3
 

Animal Adaptations

Generative Topic: Animal Adaptations

Essential Questions:  

How do organisms live, grow, respond to their environment and reproduce?  

How and why do organisms interact with their environment and what are the effects of these interactions?  

How can there be so many similarities among organisms yet so many different kinds of plants, animals, and microorganisms?  

What are the roles of organisms in a food chain?   

How do the structures and functions of living things allow them to meet their needs?

What are characteristics that allow populations of animals to survive in an environment?

How does the variation among individuals affect their survival?

Understanding Moves: Describe What's There, Uncovering Complexity, Reason with Evidence

Thinking Moves: See Think Wonder, Parts Purposes Complexities

Lesson Focus:  

Students will investigate that animals have both internal and external structures that serve various functions in growth, survival, behavior, and reproduction and will engage in engineering and design.  Students build a model and use their understanding of how animals are adapted to survive in a particular environment.

Prior Learnings/Connection:

Students have prior knowledge about ecosystems, animal classifications, basic adaptations such as means of obtaining diet, protection, and movement.

Understandings:

Organisms interact in feeding relationships in ecosystems.

Organisms may compete for resources in an ecosystem.

For any particular environment, some kinds of organisms survive well, some survive less well, and some cannot survive at all.

Populations live in a variety of habitats, and change in those habitats affects the organisms living there.

Other characteristics result from individuals’ interactions with the environment. Many characteristics involve both inheritance and environment.

Many characteristics of organisms are inherited from their parents.

When the environment changes in ways that affect a place’s physical characteristics, temperature, or availability of resources, some organisms survive and reproduce, others move to new locations, yet others move into the transformed environment, and some die.

Populations live in a variety of habitats, and change in those habitats affects the organisms living there.

Aquisition of Knowledge and Skill

Knowledge:

Producers (plants, algae, phytoplankton) make their own food, which is also used by animals (consumers).

Decomposers eat dead plant and animal materials and recycle the nutrients in the system.

Adaptations are structures and behaviors of an organism that help it survive and reproduce. 

Organisms are related in feeding relationships called food chains. Animals eat plants, and other animals eat those animals.

Skills:

Make observations to produce data to serve as the basis for evidence for an explanation of a phenomenon or test a design solution.

Use evidence (e.g. measurements, observations, patterns) to construct an explanation.

Identify the cause and effect relationships that are routinely identified and used to explain change.

Observe and identify structures and behaviors that help an animal survive in its environment.

Present results of their investigations in an organized manner.

Make a claim and supporting it with evidence.

Synthesize information from more than one source.

Assessment Evidence:

Performance Task: 

This collaborative project gives students the opportunity to take part in the systematic practice of engineering and design to achieve solutions to problems. During a life science unit, fourth grade students learn that for any particular environment, some kinds of organisms survive well, some survive less well, and some cannot survive at all.  Students then apply these core scientific ideas to demonstrate understanding as they design, test, and refine an animal that is well suited to survive in its environment. By integrating content with practice, students are better able to make sense of science.

Presentation:

Students will create a  presentation in which they showcase their Animal design and explain how it is well adapted to survive in its environment.

Learning Activities:

During See Think Wonder students engage in observation of  animals as the foundation for greater insight into structure and function.  Students first look closely at an animal to fully observe and notice before interpreting.  Then students can begin to make interpretations based on their observations.  Students use Smithsonian Collection resources, such as videos, 3D models with pins/annotations, articles to further explore blue crab structures and behaviors and how they help the animal survive in its environment.   Students then use Parts Purposes Complexities routine to develop understanding of the concept of adaptation - a structure or behavior that improves an organism's chance of survival.  Students study the blue crab environment and as they consider how people changing the crabs' environment have affected the blue crab population.  To assess understanding, students complete the Animal Adaptations design challenge.

#PZPGH

Darlene Smith
15
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