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Found 479 Collections

 

Think Blue: Crustaceans

Esta é uma coleção de recursos do Smithsonian Learning Lab sobre crustáceos desenvolvida para Think Blue e Virtual Educa 2018. Explorais essa coleção rolando sobre cada imagem para ver o título do recurso e clique em qualquer imagem para ver mais informações sobre o recurso. Para ver outras coleções do Think Blue, visite esta página.

This is a Smithsonian Learning Lab collection of resources about crustaceans developed for Think Blue and Virtual Educa 2018.  Explore this collection by scrolling over each image to see the resource’s title, and click on any image to see more information about the resource.  To view other Think Blue collections, visit this page.

Esta es una colección de recursos del Smithsonian Learning Lab sobre crustáceos desarrollada para Think Blue y Virtual Educa 2018. Exploráis esta colección desplazándose sobre cada imagen para ver el título del recurso, y haga clic en cualquier imagen para ver más información sobre el recurso. Para ver otras colecciones de Think Blue, visite esta página.

#ThinkBlue

Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access
36
 

Think Blue: Bleached Coral

Esta é uma coleção de recursos do Smithsonian Learning Lab sobre branqueamento de corais desenvolvida para Think Blue e Virtual Educa 2018. Explorais essa coleção rolando sobre cada imagem para ver o título do recurso e clique em qualquer imagem para ver mais informações sobre o recurso. Para ver outras coleções do Think Blue, visite esta página.

This is a Smithsonian Learning Lab collection of resources about coral bleaching developed for Think Blue and Virtual Educa 2018.  Explore this collection by scrolling over each image to see the resource’s title, and click on any image to see more information about the resource.  To view other Think Blue collections, visit this page.

Esta es una colección de recursos del Smithsonian Learning Lab sobre decoloración de corales desarrollada para Think Blue y Virtual Educa 2018. Exploráis esta colección desplazándose sobre cada imagen para ver el título del recurso, y haga clic en cualquier imagen para ver más información sobre el recurso. Para ver otras colecciones de Think Blue, visite esta página.

#ThinkBlue

Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access
42
 

Think Blue: Algae

Esta é uma coleção de recursos do Smithsonian Learning Lab sobre algas desenvolvida para Think Blue e Virtual Educa 2018. Explorais essa coleção rolando sobre cada imagem para ver o título do recurso e clique em qualquer imagem para ver mais informações sobre o recurso. Para ver outras coleções do Think Blue, visite esta página.

This is a Smithsonian Learning Lab collection of resources about algae developed for Think Blue and Virtual Educa 2018.  Explore this collection by scrolling over each image to see the resource’s title, and click on any image to see more information about the resource.  To view other Think Blue collections, visit this page.

Esta es una colección de recursos del Smithsonian Learning Lab sobre algas desarrollada para Think Blue y Virtual Educa 2018. Exploráis esta colección desplazándose sobre cada imagen para ver el título del recurso, y haga clic en cualquier imagen para ver más información sobre el recurso. Para ver otras colecciones de Think Blue, visite esta página.

#ThinkBlue

Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access
36
 

Theodore Roszak in the Smithsonian collections

Theodore Roszak (1907-1981) was a Polish American painter and sculptor. He emigrated to the United States as a young child, and won the Logan Medal of Art by age 25. He later moved to New York and taught at Sarah Lawrence College and Columbia University.

Included in this collection are several works of art and a podcast from the collections of the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, the National Portrait Gallery, and the Smithsonian American Art Museum. You can find other works by searching the collections.

Philippa Rappoport
20
 

Their Voice: Stories of Lowell Refugees

This exhibit at Lowell National Historical Park, Lowell, Massachusetts, features the stories of five refugees who came to Lowell as teenagers. As they established new lives here, they tried to maintain their cultural heritage while building a sense of belonging in the United States. Read their stories and hear, in their own words, why they left their home countries, their experiences as refugees, and how they are adapting to life in Lowell.  

#TCSLowell #APA2018

Carey Reeve Hildebrant
9
 

The Virgin Mary

This is a topical collection of artworks related to the Virgin Mary, a religious figure honored by many faiths and particularly revered in the Roman Catholic and Eastern Orthodox churches.

Compare the many ways that Mary is portrayed across the globe. How is she posed? Are others included in the image? What colors or symbols are prevalent?

This collection gives insight not only into the religious significance of Mary, but also into the spread and adaptation of Christianity as it is practiced in various parts of the world. In addition, viewers might consider how different artists add their unique perspective to a common and widely-known subject.

tags: religion, Christianity, Jesus, Maria, Mary, Virgen, Virgin, Madonna, Maria, Theotokos, comparison

Kate Harris
25
 

The Value of a Sketch

A design project’s aesthetics and cultural impact are usually the primary consideration as to the effectiveness and quality of a designer's approach to problem-solving. What is often overlooked in these perspectives are the various preliminary approaches that designers employ—how do we visualize and ultimately share our ideas with others?

Within design education, projects are usually conceived to help expose students to the “design process,” an often-complex journey of experiments and discoveries. This process helps guide students in the creation of future successful design solutions. With the progress of the digital experience (PowerPoint presentations, iPhone apps, and Virtual Reality), the art of the sketch seems to be a casualty of the current state of the design process.

What can we learn from a sketch? Is the sketch a dead art form, forever packed away in folders or archives never to be seen again? Or, can we reevaluate its historical contributions in the design process and creation of artful typographic syntax and hierarchy, image creation, and narrative development?

 Most often, these small, thumbnail sketches speak only to a limited audience (Art Directors, other designers, or only the designer themselves) and, therefore, usually have a limited impact. But, in the hands of a skilled and creative designer, these sketches can mean the difference between success or failure, the green light, or the idea being squashed.

As a supplement to several educational design projects, this collection attempts to expose students to the value of the simple pencil sketch. How can we use the sketching process to encourage young designers to visualize away from the computer and avoid the digital “sameness” pervasive in our visual world?

This collection attempts to chronicle the process of various designers and their projects (both large and small, complex, and simple) and presents their approach to preliminary ideation through the sketching process. The collection includes thumbnails, photographs, color studies, line reductions as well as the completed project in hopes of revealing The Value of a Simple Sketch.

Designers/Artist included:

Willi Kunz, (1943 - )  Swiss-born Kunz, played a significant role in the introduction of the new typography developed from Basel to the United States, where he currently lives and works.

Dan Friedman, (1945–1995) noted American graphic and furniture designer and educator. One of the significant contributors to the New Wave typography movement.

Painter Piet Mondrian (1872–1944) was the leader of the Dutch De Stijl movement, where he implemented an extreme visual vocabulary consisting of planes of primary colors, simplified right angles, and linear accents.

Tom Engeman, (1934 - ), American designer and Illustrator who has designed and illustrated several stamps for the United States Postal Service, including the Flags of Our Nation forever stamps and the 150th Anniversary of the Smithsonian commemorative stamp.

Ned Drew
109
 

The use of objects in teaching language, communications and information exchange.

A collection of education and teaching images that help us assess the value and utility of using real objects when presenting classes that involve language, communication and information exchange skills. #Teachinginquiry

Donald Guadagni
18
 

The Story of America in the Holocaust


Through this curation, one can see a clear story path. It all begins with the struggles that started in Europe that forced these refugees to attempt to flee to asylum. Getting to America, for those trying to escape, was a very difficult feat due to new legislation and American stubbornness towards immigrants. For those lucky enough to get to America, they soon discovered that this “sanctuary” held many of the same prejudice and anti semitic beliefs that were forged in Europe. Overall, this curation was made to track the struggles of Jews through all stages in their journey to America.

MADDIE YP
16
 

The Smithsonian's Caribbean Indigenous Legacies Project: Celebrating Taíno Culture

This topical collection contains information about the Smithsonian's Caribbean Indigenous Legacies Project: Celebrating Taíno Culture, with links to the Heye Center exhibition, "Taíno : Native Heritage and Identity in the Caribbean," and to a related public program/webcast, "Taíno: A Symposium in Conversation with the Movement," from the National Museum of the American Indian. 

Philippa Rappoport
6
 

The Search for an American Identity: Smithsonian-Montgomery College Faculty Fellowship 2019 Opening Panel Resources

This collection serves as an introduction to the opening panel of the 2019 Smithsonian-Montgomery College Faculty Fellowship Program. This year's theme is “The Search for an American Identity: Building a Nation Together.” Three Smithsonian staff members will present at the opening panel, including David Penney (Associate Director of Research and Scholarship at the National Museum of the American Indian), Ranald Woodaman (Director of Exhibitions and Public Programs at the Smithsonian Latino Center), and Paula Johnson (Curator at the National Museum of American History). Their bios, presentation descriptions, and other resources are included inside.

As you explore the resources be sure to jot down any questions you may have for the presenters. 

It's going to be a great seminar series!


#MCteach

Philippa Rappoport
17
 

The Red Scare

This collection features resources (photographs, portraits, documents, articles, and videos) about the Second Red Scare (1947-57), a period of anti-communist fear, also known as "McCarthyism," that spread through American life at the beginning of the Cold War.  Resources include key people, such as Joseph McCarthy, Edward R. Murrow, Alger Hiss, and Ethel and Julius Rosenberg, letters documenting a university's requirement that faculty affirm they were not members of the Communist Party, individuals targeted by House Un-American Activities Committee, and more.

This collection provides a launching point for further research and should not be considered comprehensive.

Keywords: communism, anti-communism, anticommunism, HUAC, HCUA, hollywood blacklist, ray cohn 

Tess Porter
45
 

The Race to Space: Understanding the Cold War Context of the Apollo 11 Mission

By using this collection, learners will . . .

  • Use primary sources to understand a range of perspectives on the Space Race.
  • Understand why the United States was concerned about the Soviet space program.
  • Be able to analyze the Cold War era context of the Space Race and draw their own conclusions about the success of the Space Race.
HeinzHistoryCenterEducation
22
 

The Pittsburgh Survey

This topical collection contains resources related to the Pittsburgh Survey, a groundbreaking Progressive Era research study of the living and working conditions in turn-of-the-century Pittsburgh. This study, published in books and magazines, led to the passage of worker-safety laws and encouraged other Progressive Era reforms. The images, readings, and links to archival materials in this collection can be used to support exploration of the questions below.

Guiding Questions:

  • In what way did the Pittsburgh Survey reflect Progressive Era concerns, strategies, and achievements?
  • How did Progressive Era beliefs about social change differ from those held previously?

Tags: Progressives, child labor, worker safety, scientific management, muckrakers, reform movement, Lewis Hine, Paul Kellogg, Crystal Eastman. Joseph Stella, Homestead, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

Kate Harris
13
 

The NHD at NMAAHC Collection Connection Grid 2018: Conflict and Compromise in History

Welcome to the National Museum of African American History and Culture Collection Grid for the 2018 NHD Theme!

Below are some documents, images, objects and videos to help you explore the 2018 NHD theme: Conflict and Compromise in History. These documents, images, objects and videos are intended to help highlight the African American experience and perspective in American and international history.

These documents, images, objects and videos may help you form an idea for a project topic or they may help to expand the narrative of your selected project. Click on the text icon for possible project connections, questions to help with analysis, creative activities,  and/or the paper clip icon to reveal questions or comments to spark your curiosity.

#NHD2018 #NHD

National Museum of African American History and Culture
75
 

The NHD @ NMAAHC Collection Connection Grid 2017: Taking a Stand in History

Welcome to the National Museum of African American History and Culture Collection Grid for the 2017 NHD Theme!

Below are some objects and videos to help you explore the 2017 NHD theme: Taking a Stand in History. These objects will help you consider the perspective of the African American experience in history.

These objects may help you form an idea for a project topic or they may help to expand the narrative of your selected project. Click on the text icon for possible project connections and/or the hotspots to reveal object questions to spark your curiosity.

The artifact questions should encourage viewers to think and explore the history of the object or video on their own!

National Museum of African American History and Culture
46
 

The Native American Struggle for Treaty Rights and Tribal Sovereignty

This collection serves as a preview for the sixth (final) of six seminar sessions in the 2018 Smithsonian-Montgomery College Faculty Fellowship Program. This year's theme is “We the People: America’s Grand and Radical Experiment with Democracy.”

National Museum of American Indian colleagues Mark Hirsch, David Penney, and Colleen Call Smith will explore the past, present, and future of treaties between the United States and Native nations, and show how American Indians have drawn on these 18th- and 19th -century agreements to defend tribal rights and exercise political sovereignty in the 20th and 21st centuries.  They will also discuss their efforts to integrate the exhibition's main themes and messages into the museum’s “Native Knowledge 360°” initiative, a national educational program designed to change the way American Indian histories, cultures, and contemporary lives are taught in K-12 classrooms.

Resources included in this collection have been chosen by the presenters for participants to explore before the seminar itself.

#MCteach

Philippa Rappoport
8
 

The Iñupiaq People and Their Culture

By Beverly Faye Hugo (Iñupiaq), 2009

(This is shortened version of a longer essay from the Smithsonian book Living Our Cultures, Sharing Our Heritage: The First Peoples of Alaska.)

Sea, Land, Rivers

There’s ice and snow, the ocean and darkness – darkness in the winter and twenty-four hours of daylight in the summer. Barrow was originally called Utqiaġvik (meaning, “the place where ukpik, the snowy owl, nests”). That’s where my people, the Iñupiat, have survived and lived, and I am doing as they have done. On the Arctic coast you can see vast distances in all directions, out over the ocean and across the land. The country is very flat, with thousands of ponds and lakes, stretching all the way to the Brooks Range in the south. It is often windy, and there are no natural windbreaks, no trees, only shrubs. Beautiful flowers grow during the brief summer season. The ocean is our garden, where we hunt the sea mammals that sustain us. Throughout the year some seasonal activity is going on. We are whaling in the spring and fall, when the bowheads migrate past Barrow, going out for seals and walrus, fishing, or hunting on the land for caribou, geese, and ducks.

Whaling crews are made up of family members and relatives, and everyone takes part. The spring is an exciting time when the whole community is focused on the whales, hoping to catch one. The number we are permitted to take each year is set by the Alaska Eskimo Whaling Commission and the International Whaling Commission. Whaling is not for the faint of heart. It can be dangerous and takes an incredible amount of effort – getting ready, waiting for the whales, striking and pulling and towing them. But the men go out and do it because they want to feed the community. Everyone has to work hard throughout the whaling season. People who aren’t able to go out on the ice help in other ways, such as buying supplies and gas or preparing food. You have to make clothing for them; they need warm parkas, boots, and snow pants.

We believe that a whale gives itself to a captain and crew who are worthy people, who have integrity – that is the gift of the whale. Caring for whales, even after you’ve caught them, is important. After a whale is caught and divided up, everyone can glean meat from the bones. Each gets his share, even those who don’t belong to a crew. No one is left out.

We are really noticing the effects of global warming. The shorefast ice is much thinner in spring than it used to be, and in a strong wind it will sometimes break away. If you are out on the ice, you have to be extremely conscious of changes in the wind and current so that you will not be carried off on a broken floe. We are concerned as well about the effects of offshore drilling and seismic testing by the oil companies. They try to work with the community to avoid problems, but those activities could frighten the whales and be detrimental to hunting.

 

Community and Family

Iñupiaq residents of Barrow, Wales, Point Hope, Wainwright, and other coastal communities, are the Taġiuqmiut, “people of the salt.” People who live in the interior are the Nunamiut, “people of the land.” The Nunamiut used to be nomadic, moving from camp to camp with their dog teams, hunting and fishing to take care of their families. They packed light and lived in skin tents, tracking the caribou and mountain sheep. My husband, Patrick Hugo, was one of them. For the first six years of his life his family traveled like that, but when the government built a school at Anaktuvuk Pass in 1959 they settled there.

My parents, Charlie and Mary Edwardson, were my foremost educators. They taught me my life skills and language. When I came to awareness as a young child, all the people who took care of me spoke Iñupiaq, so that was my first language. Our father would trap and hunt. We never went hungry and had the best furs for our parkas. Our mother was a fine seamstress, and we learned to sew by helping her. My mother and grandmother taught us to how to care for a family and to do things in a spirit of cooperation and harmony.

I was a child during the Bureau of Indian Affairs era, when we were punished for speaking Iñupiaq in school. My first day in class was the saddest one of my young life. I had to learn English, and that was important, but my own language is something that I value dearly and have always guarded. It is a gift from my parents and ancestors, and I want to pass it on to my children and grandchildren and anyone who wants to learn.

 

Ceremony and Celebration

Nalukataq (blanket toss) is a time of celebration when spring whaling has been successful. It is a kind of all-day picnic. People visit with friends and family at the windbreaks that the crews set up by tipping the whale boats onto their sides. At noon they serve niġliq (goose) soup, dinner rolls, and tea. At around 3:00 P.M. we have mikigaq, made of fermented whale meat, tongue, and skin. At 5:00 they serve frozen maktak (whale skin and blubber) and quaq (raw frozen fish). It’s wonderful to enjoy these foods, to talk, and catch up with everyone at the end of the busy whaling season.

Kivgik, the Messenger Feast, was held in the qargi (ceremonial house). The umialgich (whaling captains) in one community sent messengers to the leaders of another, inviting them and their families to come for days of feasting, dances, and gift giving. They exchanged great quantities of valuable things – piles of furs, sealskins filled with oil, weapons, boats, and sleds. That took place until the early years of the twentieth century, when Presbyterian missionaries suppressed our traditional ceremonies, and many of the communal qargich in the villages were closed down.

In 1988, Mayor George Ahmaogak Sr. thought it was important to revitalize some of the traditions from before the Christian era, and Kivgik was started again. Today it is held in the high school gymnasium. People come to Barrow from many different communities to take part in the dancing and maġgalak, the exchange of gifts. You give presents to people who may have helped you or to those whom you want to honor.  Kivgiq brings us together as one people, just as it did in the time of our ancestors.

Tags: Iñupiaq, Inupiaq, Alaska Native, Indigenous, Smithsonian Arctic Studies Center in Alaska, whale, whaling, human geography

Smithsonian Arctic Studies Center in Alaska
20
 

The Irish Experience in Pittsburgh

Created for the AIU3 workshop on 3/17/17, this topical collection includes images from Historic Pittsburgh (http://digital.library.pitt.edu/images/pittsburgh/), the Smithsonian Collection, the records of the Ancient Order of Hibernians in the Detre Library and Archives, Heinz History Center, and additional web resources. This large group of documents is intended to be shaped and whittled into useful collections for individual classrooms. Teachers might consider linking the documents to themes like:

•Immigration

•Push and Pull factors

•Growth of social networks

•Assimilation

•Nativism

•Contributions (Political, Cultural, Military, Philanthropy)

•Industry in Western PA

•Labor Movement


To make this collection your own, copy it and then use the edit feature to add and remove documents as well as contribute any annotations that might help your students.

Kate Harris
29
 

The Impact of Color in Paintings

This collection includes paintings of similar subjects  (women) presented in both black and white and in color. The objective of this project is for students to recognize and think about the impact of color on their interpretations.  Identify responses to color and think about it as one of the artist's tools for conveying meaning.

 

Tags: Elizabeth McCausland; Childe Hassam; Antonia de Banuelos; Angel Rodriguez-Diaz; William H. Johnson

Samantha Castaneda
6
 

The Hexagon and Honey Bee in Design and Engineering

Exploring the hexagon in design and engineering, using the honey bee as a model.

Pamela Schembri
39
 

The Global Implications of HIV/AIDS - An Interdisciplinary Exploration

This collection includes several images that could be used as starting points for students to engage in a dialogue about the complexities of HIV/AIDS. I would very much encourage students to be given choice when exploring a topic from an interdisciplinary approach, but often it can be helpful to provide a starting point.  Works of art can be used, as there are opportunities for students to engage in conversations in pairs or small/large groups about multifaceted issues such as this.  A painting or photograph can provide a low-risk way of beginning a discussion about challenging topics. 

Students should feel free to use other areas of knowledge beyond what I have included such as Geography and History or more detailed topics such as stigma or virology.  Data from the local Department of Health could also be used in addition to or in place of the Gapminder HIV Chart. To see a sample exploration that could be used in place of a much larger interdisciplinary exploration, please see the collection titled "The Global Implications of HIV/AIDS."

Emily Veres
18
 

The Fight to End Apartheid

This is a topical collection of resources related to the fight to end apartheid. Teachers and students can use this collection to explore strategies used to fight against apartheid as well as famous leaders in the fight. Strategies include economic sanctions, boycotts, and divestment, raising awareness through artists and musicians, nonviolent protest, armed resistance, and external political pressures on the South African government. This is a work-in-progress based on the digitized materials within the Smithsonian Learning Lab's collection--it is not meant to be wholly definitive or authoritative. Think of it as a starting point for further inquiry!

Possible student activities include:

-researching one strategy of resistance and/or one well-known leader in depth.

-drawing comparisons between political organizations and movements like the ANC, PAC, Black Consciousness Movement, and United Democratic Front.

-creating a timeline of resistance to apartheid.

-debating the use of armed resistance and "sabotage."

-interviewing adults who may remember the end of apartheid.

-drawing comparisons between the civil rights movement in the United States and the anti-apartheid movement.

-choose 1-3 events and make a case for them as turning points in the fight against apartheid. What makes these events so significant?

tags: apartheid, South Africa, Mandela, Tutu, Huddleston, Soweto, townships, Sharpeville, Defiance Campaign, Biko

Kate Harris
28
 

The Fall of Rome

#TeachingInquiry 

Josh Walker
8
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