Skip to Content
  • Language
  • End User
  • Educational Use
  • Time Required
(202)
(683)
(769)
(761)
(867)
(6)
(435)
(322)
(211)
(509)
(221)
(269)

Found 885 Collections

 

Viral Histories: Community Organizing in America's Chinatowns

What drives us to build community strength and resiliency during an emergency? 

During the COVID-19 pandemic, Asian Americans have been experiencing increased racism and hate crimes. While these incidents of increased prejudice and violence occur today, they reflect a long history of how power, prejudice, and public health have intersected throughout American history. For Asian Pacific American History Month, Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History held conversations in a series called Viral Histories: Stories of Racism, Resilience, and Resistance in Asian American Communities, with community leaders combating racism while serving on the front lines. Community leaders shared their first-hand experience with historians who connect these experiences to the past.  

In this topical collection, co-hosts Theodore S. Gonzalves, Smithsonian National Museum of American History Curator of Asian Pacific American History, and Lintaro Donovan, High School Student and Civic Leader, interview Max Leung, creator of the San Francisco Peace Collective, a volunteer civilian patrol group in San Francisco's Chinatown. Max discusses the impacts of COVID-19 on San Francisco's Chinatown community and how we can organize for our neighbors in the middle of a pandemic. 

This topical collection aims to contextualize what we learn from Max's interview by providing additional information about how Asian American communities have organized in the past and the present during COVID-19. As you explore the resources in this collection and reflect on Max's interview, we ask you to consider this question for self-reflection and discussion: What drives us to build community strength and resiliency during an emergency? 

#ViralHistories

Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center
20
 

Viral Histories: Asian American Resistance and Resilience

What is our responsibility to examine the assumptions we have about others? 

During the COVID-19 pandemic, Asian Americans have been experiencing increased racism and hate crimes. While these incidents of increased prejudice and violence occur today, they reflect a long history of how power, prejudice, and public health have intersected throughout American history. For Asian Pacific American History Month, Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History held conversations in a series called Viral Histories: Stories of Racism, Resilience, and Resistance in Asian American Communities, with community leaders combating racism while serving on the front lines. Community leaders shared their first-hand experience with historians who connect these experiences to the past.  

In this topical collection, co-hosts Theodore S. Gonzalves, Smithsonian National Museum of American History Curator of Asian Pacific American History, and Lintaro Donovan, High School Student and Civic Leader, interview Russell Jeung, Professor of Asian American Studies at San Francisco State University and creator of "Stop AAPI Hate," about the impacts of COVID-19 and the rise of anti-Asian racism. 

This topical collection aims to contextualize what we learn from Prof. Jeung's interview by providing additional information about the Chinese Exclusion Act, the Yellow Peril rhetoric from the 19th century, as well as moments of community resilience and resistance. As you explore the resources in the collection, we ask you to consider this question for self-reflection or discussion: What is our responsibility to examine the assumptions we have about others? 

#ViralHistories

Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center
17
 

Viral Histories: Asian Americans and the Food Service Industry

How do we maintain strength and community after an emergency is over? 

During the COVID-19 pandemic, Asian Americans have been experiencing increased racism and hate crimes. While these incidents of increased prejudice and violence occur today, they reflect a long history of how power, prejudice, and public health have intersected throughout American history. For Asian Pacific American History Month, Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History held conversations in a series called Viral Histories: Stories of Racism, Resilience, and Resistance in Asian American Communities, with community leaders combating racism while serving on the front lines. Community leaders shared their first-hand experience with historians who connect these experiences to the past.  

In this topical collection, co-hosts Theodore S. Gonzalves, Smithsonian National Museum of American History Curator of Asian Pacific American History, and Lintaro Donovan, High School Student and Civic Leader, interview Genevieve Villamora, co-owner of the Washington, DC-based restaurant Bad Saint, about the impacts of COVID-19 on the food service industry. 

This topical collection aims to contextualize what we learn from Genevieve Villamora's interview by providing additional information about the history of Asian Americans in the American food service industry and stories about Asian American foodways. As you explore the resources in this collection, and reflect on Genevieve Villamora's interview, we ask you to consider this question for self-reflection or discussion: How do we maintain strength and community after an emergency is over? 

#ViralHistories 

 

Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center
19
 

Viral Histories: Filipino American Nurses and Healthcare Workers

What do we take for granted? How does this inform the choices we make?

During the COVID-19 pandemic, Asian Americans have been experiencing increased racism and hate crimes. While these incidents of increased prejudice and violence occur today, they reflect a long history of how power, prejudice, and public health have intersected throughout American history. For Asian Pacific American History Month, Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History held conversations in a series called Viral Histories: Stories of Racism, Resilience, and Resistance in Asian American Communitieswith community leaders combating racism while serving on the front lines. Community leaders shared their first-hand experience with historians who connect these experiences to the past.  

In this topical collection, Viral Histories co-hosts Theodore S. Gonzalves, Smithsonian National Museum of American History Curator of Asian Pacific American History, and Lintaro Donovan, High School Student and Civic Leader, interview Abigaile De Mesa, a supervising nurse from New Jersey about the impacts of COVID-19 on healthcare workers. 

This topical collection aims to contextualize what we learn from Abigaile De Mesa's interview by providing additional information about the US Philippine War, the migration of Filipino nurses to the United States, and how COVID-19 is impacting nurses today. As you explore the resources in this collection, and reflect on Abigaile's interview, we ask you to consider this question for self-reflection or discussion: What do we take for granted? How does this inform the choices we make? 

Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center
19
 

Anna May Wong x Sally Wen Mao

How can you be a changemaker in society? 

This topical collection honors the life of film icon Anna May Wong by pairing images from the Smithsonian National Portrait Gallery collections with poetry by celebrated contemporary poet Sally Wen Mao. Wong's film and television career spanned from 1919 to 1960, and included numerous star turns, transnational celebrity, and an array of firsts for an Asian American actress. It was also a career forged in the shadow of--and in defiance of--widespread xenophobia, leaving a legacy that takes on a new cast and consequence today, in an era of COVID-19 and virulent anti-Asian racism. 

After viewing this topical collection, visit https://smithsonianapa.org/anna-may-wong/ to:

  • download a set of postcards that include portraits of Anna May Wong and Sally Wen Mao's poetry
  • watch a short video by Sally Wen Mao about her "patron saint," and
  • instructions for making your own postcards.
Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center
29
 

#ColorOurCollections at the National Portrait Gallery

This Learning Lab collection has been created to encourage learners of all ages to #ColorOurCollections and engage with our portraits! Each coloring page is followed by the portrait in our collection that the coloring page is based on. We invite you to compare and contrast your creation with our collections! What might you add to your portrait? What colors would you use? What choices did you make that were the same as  the choices the original artist made? What choices did you make that were different?

#NPGteach #myNPG

Ashley M. Paxton
47
 

Smithsonian Arctic Studies Center in Alaska (https://learninglab.si.edu/org/sasc-ak)

Alaska Native heritage is woven from the beliefs, values, knowledge and arts of the Iñupiaq, Athabascan, St. Lawrence Island Yupik, Yup'ik, Unangax̂, Sugpiaq, Eyak, Tlingit, Haida and Tsimshian peoples. Their diverse languages, cultures and histories are the foundation for contemporary lives. 

We invite teachers, students, parents and lifelong learners to explore Alaska Native cultures, museum objects, communities, videos and educational resources shared here. Learn about the peoples of this northern world from elders, culture-bearers, scholars and artists: https://learninglab.si.edu/org/sasc-ak.

About Us: In 1994, the Smithsonian Institution’s Arctic Studies Center (ASC) opened an office in Alaska at the Anchorage Museum, where staff members work with Alaska Natives on collaborative research and educational programs. In 2010, ASC opened the long-term exhibition Living Our Cultures, Sharing Our Heritage: The First Peoples of Alaska. It presents Indigenous voices, perspectives and knowledge through more than 600 masterworks of Alaska Native art and design from the Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History and National Museum of the American Indian collections. Through their ongoing work, the ASC makes Smithsonian resources accessible to Alaska Natives and the general public.

Smithsonian Arctic Studies Center in Alaska
1
 

Making a "Kitchen Memories" Family Recipe and Storybook

This collection includes an easy-to-do book project designed to get families talking, creating, and enjoying food together. It can be used as a home project, in the classroom (English, art, social studies), or in an informal learning setting, and can be combined with a family interviewing video project. 

The book is made from a single, large sheet of paper. Click on the demo and accompanying downloadable instructions to get started!

tags: art, crafts, crafting, how-to

Philippa Rappoport
7
 

#ColorOurCollections at the National Portrait Gallery

This Learning Lab collection has been created to encourage learners of all ages to #ColorOurCollections and engage with our portraits! Each coloring page is followed by the portrait in our collection that the coloring page is based on. We invite you to compare and contrast your creation with our collections! What might you add to your portrait? What colors would you use? What choices did you make that were the same as  the choices the original artist made? What choices did you make that were different?

#NPGteach #myNPG

Melissa Sorrells
47
 

Picasso vs. Matisse

I created this collection for families to do together while schools are closed. I will be making a collection a day while we are out of school. Today we will be exploring Pablo Picasso and Henri Matisse. The idea is for families to look at the items in the collection and consider what they see in the objects and paintings, what they think, and what they wonder. Families can also watch a free Brainpop video about cubism. Families can explore a Make It Collection from the Hirshhorn. At the end of the collection I have provided a few ideas for families about what to do next.

If you want to learn more about more about See Think Wonder you can click here to see a video of a teacher using the routine in her classroom.

Henri Matisse (1869–1954) and Pablo Picasso (1881–1973) met in 1906 and for more than half a century followed each other’s creative developments and achievements.

Ellen Rogers
34
 

Beguiling Busy Bees

I created this collection for families to do together while schools are closed. I will be making a collection a day while we are out of school. Today we will be exploring bees. The idea is for families to look at the items in the collection and consider what they see in the objects and paintings, what they think, and what they wonder. Families can also watch a free Brainpop video about bees as well as explore bee behavior. Families can watch science videos and read articles about bees. At the end of the collection I have provided a few ideas for families about what to do next.

If you want to learn more about more about See Think Wonder you can click here to see a video of a teacher using the routine in her classroom.

Ellen Rogers
26
 

James Smithson: What's in a Name?

Do you know how the Smithsonian got its name?  If you answered "no" you are not alone.  A lot of people know about the Smithsonian Institution, but they don't know about the man who gave his name and bequest to create what has become the largest museum complex and research center in the world.

Curious?  Well, here's the story...

Laura Shafer
11
 

Design It Yourself: Design a School

Follow along to design a school inspired by 2017 National Design Award Winner for Architecture Design, Mass Design Group.

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
25
 

No Bones About It: Cephalopods Are Cool!

I created this collection for families to do together while schools are closed. I will be making a collection a day while we are out of school. Today we will be exploring cephalopods. (Squid and Octopus) The idea is for families to look at the items in the collection and consider what they see in the objects and paintings, what they think, and what they wonder. Families can also watch a free Brainpop video about squids as well as explore OctoCam with live video of the Pacific Octopus tank. Families can watch science videos and read articles about cephalopods. At the end of the collection I have provided a few ideas for families about what to do next.

If you want to learn more about more about See Think Wonder you can click here to see a video of a teacher using the routine in her classroom.

Ellen Rogers
45
 

Skateboarding: To Shred or Not To Shred

I created this collection for families to do together while schools are closed. I will be making a collection a day while we are out of school. Today we will be exploring skateboarding. The idea is for families to look at the items in the collection and consider what they see in the objects and paintings, what they think, and what they wonder. Families can also watch a video about skateboarding as well as a video about making a modified skateboard. At the end of the collection I have provided a few ideas for families about what to do next.

If you want to learn more about more about See Think Wonder you can click here to see a video of a teacher using the routine in her classroom.

Ellen Rogers
27
 

Donut Worry, Be Happy

I created this collection for families to do together while schools are closed. I will be making a collection a day while we are out of school. Today we will be exploring donuts. The idea is for families to look at the items in the collection and consider what they see in the objects and paintings, what they think, and what they wonder. Families can also watch a video about the history of donuts as well as podcast episodes about donuts. At the end of the collection I have provided a few ideas for families about what to do next.

If you want to learn more about more about See Think Wonder you can click here to see a video of a teacher using the routine in her classroom.

Ellen Rogers
18
 

Catching Some Zs

I created this collection for families to do together while schools are closed. I will be making a collection a day while we are out of school. Today we will be exploring sleeping. The idea is for families to look at the items in the collection and consider what they see in the objects and paintings, what they think, and what they wonder. Families can also listen to kids' podcast about sleeping as well as a video about dreaming. At the end of the collection I have provided a few ideas for families about what to do next.

If you want to learn more about more about See Think Wonder you can click here to see a video of a teacher using the routine in her classroom.

Ellen Rogers
27
 

Kids Can Cook!

I created this collection for families to do together while schools are closed. I will be making a collection a day while we are out of school. Today we will be exploring cooking. The idea is for families to look at the items in the collection and consider what they see in the objects and paintings, what they think, and what they wonder. Families can also listen to kids' podcast about cooking as well as design a new utensil. At the end of the collection I have provided a few ideas for families about what to do next.

If you want to learn more about more about See Think Wonder you can click here to see a video of a teacher using the routine in her classroom.

Ellen Rogers
35
 

Tuia te here tangata waka | Binding the ties of humanity canoe

This collection is built around a waka Māori currently on display in the National Museum of Natural History.
waka is a traditional canoe. It is designed as a portal to Te Ao Māori - The indigenous worldview  Māori are the native people of New Zealand. Its traditional name is Aotearoa meaning Land of the long white cloud.

This waka was made from a single 100-year old Tōtara tree. Tōtara is a large native New Zealand hardwood that grows throughout the North and South Island. It is light weighted and high natural oil content which prevents rotting or deterioration. Waka are extensions of Māori tribal history and are the traditional technology responsible for mobilising navigators across the Pacific Ocean. The infamous explorer Kupe, discovered New Zealand in 925 AD.

The name of the waka is Tuia te here tangata meaning Binding the ties of humanity. It celebrates the connection established in 1840 between the US Exploring expedition and Māori. The name and physical artefact hope to inspire understanding. The collection aims to digitally illustrate the mauri or life force of the waka. We can transform our wounds into wisdom by seeking first to understand, and then to be understood.

Anahera Hare
66
 

Design It Yourself: Design a Park

Follow along to design a park inspired by 2017 National Design Award Winner for Landscape Architecture, Surfacedesign.

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
24
 

The 1920s: A Decade of Change

This playlist on the 1920s is designed for self-guided learning with intermittent check-ins for middle school age students. The learning tasks are divided over five days, designed for 30-35 minutes per day, and build on each other. However, students are able to work on this playlist at their own pace. They will engage with primary and secondary sources as well as online exhibitions, videos, and written texts. Students can complete the tasks online by connecting through Google classroom for each formative and summative assessment.

By the end of the week, students will create an original art piece to express their understanding of the social, cultural and economic changes of the 1920s. 

  • Formative assessments are represented by a chevron (Learning Check Ins and Daily Check Ins).
  • Google Doc versions of all formative and summative assessments are in the tiles immediately after the digital versions. 
National Museum of American History
64
 

Strength vs Weight

This collection includes a design challenge that explores engineering concepts and the use of lightweight structures that are also strong. 

Students will explore the benefits of a lightweight, strong structure and build within parameters to meet a challenge. Strong, light structures are necessary in constructing buildings (especially in areas with extreme weather) as well as air and space craft. 

Keywords: #airandspace, National Air and Space Museum, NASM, keva plank, 

National Air and Space Museum Smithsonian
4
 

Soccer/Football/Futbol: The World's Game

I created this collection for families to do together while schools are closed. I will be making a collection a day while we are out of school. Today we will be exploring soccer. The idea is for families to look at the items in the collection and consider what they see in the objects and paintings, what they think, and what they wonder. Families can also watch videos about soccer and learn about some famous players. At the end of the collection I have provided a few ideas for families about what to do next.

If you want to learn more about more about See Think Wonder you can click here to see a video of a teacher using the routine in her classroom.

Ellen Rogers
23
 

May the 4th Be With You

I created this collection for families to do together while schools are closed. I will be making a collection a day while we are out of school. Today we will be exploring Star Wars. The idea is for families to look at the items in the collection and consider what they see in the objects and paintings, what they think, and what they wonder. Families can also listen to Star Wars Music as well as exploring the stamps made about the movies. At the end of the collection I have provided a few ideas for families about what to do next.

If you want to learn more about more about See Think Wonder you can click here to see a video of a teacher using the routine in her classroom.

Ellen Rogers
35
49-72 of 885 Collections