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Found 943 Collections

 

Smithsonian Smithereens: Portrait of a Lady



In a Smithsonian Smithereens, something at the
Smithsonian has been blown up . . .            Click.

Smithsonian Smithereens
1
 

Smithsonian Smithereens: Coincidental Birds



In a Smithsonian Smithereens, something
at the Smithsonian has been blown up. Click.

Smithsonian Smithereens
1
 

Nutrition! Module

Coming Summer 2019!

Smithsonian Science for Global Goals
1
 

"Home and Away": Using museum objects to prompt stories and explore sense of place and belonging

"Home and Away" is a digital storytelling workshop that enhances the 4Cs (Creativity, Critical thinking, Collaboration, Communication) and improves literacy in second-language learners.  In this three-day workshop participants from Spain coming to Washington DC for an international exchange program with Oyster-Adams Bilingual School, supported by American students, will use museum objects as prompts to create videos of personal stories. No technical experience is necessary, but participants of all levels will:

  • learn about the variety of resources available in the Smithsonian Learning Lab.
  • experiment with storyboarding techniques for creative writing.
  • learn how to record and edit an audio file.
  • be supported in the selection of images and the production of a short video.
  • reflect on the Digital Storytelling 5-steps process
  • practice oral and written English language skills
  • enhance identity through personal stories
  • increase visual literacy through close looking at art

This workshop has been organised by the Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access (SCLDA) in collaboration with Oyster-Adams Bilingual School.

Workshop facilitators are Antonia Liguori (Loughborough University, UK) and Philippa Rappoport (SCLDA).

This activity is part of  “Storying” the Cultural Heritage: Digital Storytelling as a tool to enhance the 4Cs in formal and informal learning, a research project led by Dr Antonia Liguori, appointed as a Smithsonian Fellow with the Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access (SCLDA) from March 1 to June 30 2018, and is funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Council UK under the International Placement Scheme.

Antonia Liguori
18
 

"Pertenecer": Using Museum Objects to Prompt Stories and Explore Sense of Place and Belonging

Pertenecer is a digital storytelling workshop that enhances the 4Cs (Creativity, Critical thinking, Collaboration, Communication) and improves digital literacy.  In this three-day workshop participants attending Fairfax County Public School Family Literacy and/or the Parent Leadership programs will use museum objects as prompts to create videos of personal stories. No technical experience is necessary, but participants of all levels will:

  • learn about the variety of resources available in the Smithsonian Learning Lab.
  • experiment with story-boarding techniques for creative writing.
  • learn how to record and edit an audio file.
  • be supported in the selection of images and the production of a short video.
  • reflect on the Digital Storytelling 5-steps process
  • practice oral and written English language skills
  • enhance identity through personal stories
  • strengthen intergenerational family bond
  • increase visual literacy through close looking at art

_______________________________________________________________

This workshop is part of the research project "Storying the Cultural Heritage: Digital Storytelling as a tool to enhance the 4Cs in formal and informal learning" led by Dr Antonia Liguori, appointed as a Smithsonian Fellow with the Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access (SCLDA) from March 1 to June 30 2018, and is funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Council UK under the International Placement Scheme. Over the next months, Dr Antonia Liguori, in collaboration with Dr Philippa Rappoportwho has agreed to serve as principal mentor/advisor during Dr Liguori’s appointment – will work with Fairfax County Public School Family Literacy and Parent Leadership Programs to explore the use of Digital Storytelling in combination with the digital resources of the Smithsonian Learning Lab. 

Antonia Liguori
35
 

The Global Collection #TeachingInquiry

A collection focused on teaching about the power of diverse communities to Grades 3 and up. The artifacts found in this collection are intended to focus on the concept of cultural and artistic traditions by developing an understanding of diverse communities through the compelling question, “How does Culture make us similar or different?” Also, to help students build contextual knowledge under the supporting questions of (1) what is Culture, (2) how does Culture change over time, and (3) what can we learn about a Culture through their artistic traditions? #C3Framework #TeachingInquiry

lindi Ingram
14
 

Mandalas

Mandalas are an Asian form of art that are great for studying various types of symmetry.

Ask: what kind of symmetry do you see?

Line Symmetry (reflection)

Rotational Symmetry

Are there any Translations (symmetry by copying/sliding)


#tcslowell #apa2018

Jeff Todd
9
 

Hawaii

Christina Ratatori
10
 

Symbols

Christina Ratatori
9
 

World War I

Christina Ratatori
10
 

African Diaspora

Christina Ratatori
12
 

iSpy: Storytelling in Presidential Portaiture

iSpy: Storytelling in Presidential Portraiture 

 

Objective: Students will explore how elements of a portrait tell the story of the subject’s identity by comparing portraits of Presidents Washington and Obama.

 

Procedure:

  1. Instruct students to look carefully at each portrait. They should read through the information for each portrait; follow the highlight instructions; and answer the quiz questions.
  2. Lead a discussion about the symbols included each portrait. What story is the artist trying to tell? What do they leave out? How does an artist contribute to our understanding of Washington and Obama’s identity? How does art help to shape our historical understanding of their subjects?
  3. Have students create a self-portrait and write an artist’s introduction explaining how they intentionally included/excluded/highlighted symbols to tell their story of identity. If making art isn’t possible, have students write a description of what their portrait would look like.

 

 

 

For more information and context:

http://www.georgewashington.si...

https://www.newyorker.com/cult...

 #NPGteach

Christy Ting
3
 

"Conversation Circles" across the Atlantic

This workshop is a collaboration between the Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access, the Smithsonian National Portrait Gallery in Washington D.C., the School of the Arts, English and Drama - Loughborough University (UK) and Tate Exchange in London.

"Conversations Circles" is an ongoing free drop-in program for adults to practice their English and learn about American history and culture through the art of portraiture, that is designed and coordinated by the National Portrait Gallery and the DC Public Library.

During this particular workshop, the group that meets weekly at the National Portrait Gallery in Washington DC will be virtually joined by a group in London, that is already involved in a one-day storytelling workshop facilitated by researchers from Loughborough University as part of the Tate Exchange program.

Tate Exchange is an entirely new program for Tate Modern that explores how art makes a difference in society. Tate Exchange will occupy an entire floor of the new Switch House building of the new Tate Modern in London and also has an online platform for wider public engagement. The program runs from September to June every year and aims to open up the museum to new, more diverse audiences. 

Loughborough University is one of the Associates that support Tate Modern to deliver this program.
More info on the program here: http://www.tate.org.uk/visit/t...


Antonia Liguori
12
 

More Than What Meets the Eye: Exploring the Many Layers of Works of Art

This collection focuses on Southeast Asian works of art that have layers of meaning. When looking at some of these works of art at first glance, you may create your own opinions about them. It is important though to look further into the work and find the true meanings behind each piece. The true meanings can be very surprising. 

#APA2018

#TCSLowell 


Brittany Brennan
8
 

The Science of Wind and Sound through Artwork

Artwork, museums, and the community are powerful resources to bring concepts to life with young children. This collection provides examples of how to utilize museums and the community to explore STEM concepts, specifically the science of wind and sound through artwork. 

This collection was created to support the 2018 CCSSO Teacher of the Year Day at the Smithsonian.  

#NTOY18

Brooke Shoemaker
18
 

Art as Argument: Contemporary Artists' Voices

This collection explores the ways in which four American artists have used visual tools to share a message. In Amendment #8, Mark Bradford uses his layered paper and mixed media technique to challenge the viewer to consider how we are living up to the ideals of our founding documents. In Portrait of Mnonja, Mickalene Thomas references the art historical canon to address African American representation in museums. In Life Magazine, April 19, 1968, Alfredo Jaar manipulates a historical photograph to make visible the racial disparities it contains. And with her installation Folding the Chesapeake, Maya Lin begs us to see the critical importance of caring for the waterways around us. 

Created for an April 16, 2018 webinar with Montana teachers.

Phoebe Hillemann
11
 

Lowell's Cambodian American Performing Arts: Tradition & Innovation

This collection includes materials about Angkor Dance Troupe (classical and folk dance) and Flying Orb Productions (contemporary, hybrid performance and film), both located in Lowell, MA. 

Although the two organizations have different aesthetic styles, they both provide channels for Cambodian American youth and  young people of other ethnicities to connect with cultural traditions as well as to express themselves in new ways. 

Keywords: Asia* America*, Cambodia* America*, Khmer, dance, film, drama, performance, Angkor Dance Troupe, Flying Orb Productions, Southeast Asia*, Khmerica*, Southeast Asian America*

#APA2018 #TCSLowell 

Douglas StLawrence
17
 

Disabled Doesn't Mean Unable

George Pagano

Four – Six 45 minute Class Periods

Lesson Overview:

This lesson plan unit is built around the exploration of identity for individuals with disabilities. Students will be asked to examine several items in the collection and answer the following essential questions:  How can unfair/fair depictions of an individual with a disability affect their identity?  How can positive depictions empower an individual?

This theme will be combined with a component of advocacy and change: How can one advocate to make a difference? What causes a change in one's belief system? How can a portrait or image inspire change? How can a portrait or image document change?

Lessons are designed for an 8th grade interdisciplinary team approach: English, social studies, and art class. The plan for this unit includes the synthesis of visual images within the historical context of the promotion of rights for individuals with disabilities.

The subject of self-identity - the recognition of one's potential and qualities as an individual will be explored as well.  

George Pagano
16
 

Unlikely Friendships II

Additional friendships to accompany the April 2018 workshop at the National Portrait Gallery #NPGteach

These are:

Frederick Douglas and Susan B. Anthony

Mary McLeod Bethune and Eleanor Roosevelt

Mary Todd Lincoln and her seamstress and confidante Elizabeth Keckley

Entertainers Marilyn Monroe and Ella Fitzgerald

Entertainers Marilyn Monroe and Eartha Kitt

Boxers Joe Louis and Max Schmeling

Jan Rubenstein
85
 

Cambodian Traditional Crafts and Religious Ceremonies

This collection was created in 1987. It explores the traditional crafts and religious ceremonies of the Cambodian refugees who settled in Lowell in the aftermath of the Cambodian Genocide. 

Below is the list of links to the accompanying photographs also found in this collection. Please note that the chapters on the Rain Retreat Ceremony, and the Money Tree Fundraising Celebration are comprised entirely of photographs and have no accompanying text.

Keywords: Asia* America*, Cambodia*, Khmer, kite, crafts, religion, Southeast Asia*, Southeast Asian America*

#APA2018 #TCSLowell 

Southeast Asian Digital Archive
10
 

Lowell's Cambodian American Performing Arts: Tradition & Innovation

This collection includes materials about Angkor Dance Troupe (classical and folk dance) and Flying Orb Productions (contemporary, hybrid performance and film), both located in Lowell, MA. 

Although the two organizations have different aesthetic styles, they both provide channels for Cambodian American youth and  young people of other ethnicities to connect with cultural traditions as well as to express themselves in new ways. 

Keywords: Asia* America*, Cambodia* America*, Khmer, dance, film, drama, performance, Angkor Dance Troupe, Flying Orb Productions, Southeast Asia*, Khmerica*, Southeast Asian America*

#APA2018 #TCSLowell 

Southeast Asian Digital Archive
17
 

Southeast Asian American Films

This collection includes links to documentaries by & about Southeast Asian Americans. The videos are of varying lengths and cover a range of topics.

Keywords: Asia* America*, Southeast Asia*, Southeast Asian America*

Southeast Asian Digital Archive
9
 

Southeast Asian Americans in Lowell, MA

Lowell, Massachusetts is home to the second-largest Cambodian American population in the United States, with significant numbers of Vietnamese, Lao, Hmong, and more recent Burmese refugees (of varying ethnicities). The materials in this collection, compiled by the UMass Lowell Center for Asian American Studies and Southeast Asian Digital Archive, provide an overview of this diverse population.

BACKGROUND: The wars in Southeast Asia (SEA), stretching from the last 1950s to the late 1970s, involved Cambodia, Vietnam, and Laos, as well as other countries embroiled in the Cold War, including the United States and China. The conflicts resulted in over 1.2 million Southeast Asian refugees to the U.S. since 1975. 

In the late 1970s, Lowell, Massachusetts, served as a relocation center and secondary migration hub for SEA refugees. The 1980 U.S. Refugee Act  amended the earlier Immigration and Nationality Act and the Migration and Refugee Assistance Act. It raised the annual ceiling for refugees from 17,400 to 50,000, created a process for reviewing and adjusting the refugee ceiling to meet emergencies, and required annual consultation between Congress and the President. 

According to the US Census Bureau, Lowell's population of 106,519 residents is over 20% Asian American, with approximately 14,470 Cambodian Americans, ~2,057 Vietnamese American, and ~1,500 Lao Americans. (The Census also records 2,472 South Asian Americans and 322 Filipino Americans in Lowell). Community estimates are that approximately 300 Burmese refugees (including Karen, Karenni, Kachin, and other ethnic groups) reside in Lowell.

But community leaders actually believe that greater numbers live in this city; some immigrants and refugees do not report their numbers due to fears of deportation or fears of governmental officials. So the estimates of the Asian American population in Lowell range from 25,000-35,000.

Nearby Lynn, MA, is home to the third-largest Cambodian American population in the US, while Boston, MA, is home to a significant number of Vietnamese Americans, particularly in the Dorchester neighborhood. Providence, RI, is home to a large Lao Amerian population.

For a 2012 overview of Asian American communities in Massachusetts, please visit "Asian Americans in Massachusetts: A Census Profile." 

Keywords: Asia* America*, Cambodia* America*, Lao* America*, Laotian, Vietnam* America*, Burm* America*, Chin* America*, Bhutan* America*, Bhutanese, Southeast Asia*, politic*, cultur*, oral histor*, newspaper*, Khmer Post

#APA2018 #TCSLowell 

Southeast Asian Digital Archive
35
 

Japanese American Incarceration: Images of Camp Life

This topical collection includes photographs and inmate-created artwork of life in Japanese American Incarceration camps.  It is one in a series of collections, each containing different types of resources, about the Japanese American Incarceration; see also Japanese Incarceration: Publications, Letters, and Other DocumentsJapanese American Incarceration: Camp Objects, and Japanese American Incarceration: Articles and Videos about Inmate Experiences.

In February 1942, following the bombing of Pearl Harbor, President Roosevelt signed Executive Order 9066 and authorized the imprisonment of approximately 75,000 Americans of Japanese ancestry and 45,000 Japanese nationals in incarceration camps.  This order was not rescinded until 1945.

Teachers and students may use this collection as a springboard for classroom discussion; for example, how these images may reveal experiences of children and teenagers growing up in the camps. This collection is not comprehensive but rather provides a launching point for research and study.

This Smithsonian Learning Lab collection received Federal support from the Asian Pacific American Initiatives Pool, administered by the Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center.

Keywords: internment camp, Akio Ujihara, Yosh Kuromiya, world war ii, ww2, wwii, Jerome, Arkansas, Heart Mountain, Wyoming, Rohwer, Manzanar, California, Gila River, Arizona, Amache, Colorado, Tule Lake, Topaz, Utah, Minidoka, Idaho

#APA2018

Tess Porter
54
649-672 of 943 Collections