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Found 746 Collections

 

Asian Pacific American Authors

This topical collection about Asian Pacific American authors includes portraits, interviews, and book reviews. 

Teachers and students may use this collection as a springboard for classroom discussions. This collection is not comprehensive but rather provides a launching point for research and study. 

This Smithsonian Learning Lab collection received Federal support from the Asian Pacific American Initiatives Pool, administered by the Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center.  

Keywords: Jhumpa Lahiri, Indian American, Carlos Bulosan, America is in the Heart, Filipino American, Maxine Hong Kingston, Chinese American, Julie Otsuka, Japanese American, Chang-rae Lee, Korean American, Anor Lin, Sadakichi Hartmann, A.X. Ahmad, Ava Chin, P. S. Duffy, Eddie Huang, Yiyun Li, Valynne Maetani, Viet Thanh Nguyen, Vietnamese American, Ellen Oh, Vu Tran, Thrity Umrigar, literature

#APA2018

Tess Porter
28
 

Asian Americans with Disabilities in America

This collection was created by Mark Ferrer, a Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center intern. "My name is Mark Ferrer. I was the first deaf intern at APAC. I practically researched issues that I thought might help people with disabilities like me. I was resourceful and used the opportunities to create awareness for Asians with disabilities. I entitled my research as Asian Americans with Disabilities in America."


About the Asian Americans with Disabilities in America, Asian is one of the fastest-growing racial groups in the U.S. and the growth rate of Asians with disabilities progressively swelling (worsening). They were being categorized and called the handicapped, the disabled and the feeble-minded. The language barriers, not enough support, being the model minority and confusion between two cultures were only a few of the many challenges they faced. It was during the 19th and 20th centuries that they suffer from discrimination but became beneficiaries when ADA was passed in 1990. It is truly remarkable that this collection will give you information and awareness about the status of the Asians and disabled in America.

Mark Ferrer
20
 

Asian American Modernism

This collection is meant to build on two earlier collections, "Asian American Art: Emerging from the Shadows"  and "Asian American Artists and World War II" and to introduce the viewer to artists of Asian ancestry in America using Chang, Johnson & Karlstrom's text, Asian American Art: A History, 1850-1970 (2008), the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco's exhibition catalog "Asian/American/Modern Art: Shifting Currents, 1900-1970" (2008),the vast resources of the Smithsonian Learning Lab, Project Zero's Global Thinking Routines and other resources.  This collection is part two of four that I have organized, chronologically, on Asian American Art.  The other three collections are "Asian American Art: Emerging from the Shadows",  "Asian American Artists and World War II" and "Asian American Contemporary Art".  It is my hope that these collections will serve as entry points to understanding the many contributions of Asian American artists in the U.S. from 1850 until the present time.

Visual art is a language that is socially and culturally constructed.  Socially constructed learning values diverse perspectives, engages with local and global experts, and employs inquiry, discovery and exploration to move students toward global citizenship.  Because the visual arts leverage the power of dialogue and debate to sharpen critical thinking, starting with the arts is a logical place to help students develop cultural intelligence.

Other purposes of these collections are to explore tangible and intangible cultural heritage; as well as jumpstart brave conversations about race, identity and immigration in the U.S. with teachers, tutors of English Language Learners and others who are interested in becoming cultural leaders in our public schools.

As Gordon H. Chang and Mark Dean Johnson state in the introduction of the exhibition catalog, "Asian/American/Modern Art: Shifting Currents, 1900-1970" (2008):

"Forty years ago there were no Asian Americans.  There were Chinese, Japanese, Koreans, Filipinos, and others of Asian ancestry in the United States, but no 'Asian Americans,' as that term was coined only in 1968.  This population was commonly seen as foreign, alien, not of America.  Their lives and experiences were not generally accepted as part of the fabric of the country, even though Asians had begun settling here steadily in the mid-nineteenth century.

Then, in the late 1960s, as part of the upsurge in the self-assertion of marginalized communities,  'Asian America' emerged to challenge the stigma of perpetual foreignness.  'Asian American' was a claim of belonging, of rootedness, of pride and identity, and of history and community; it was also a recognition of distinctive cultural achievement"  (Chang, Johnson, 2008).

#APA2018

Julie Sawyer
18
 

Asian American Modernism

This collection is meant to build on two earlier collections, "Asian American Art: Emerging from the Shadows"  and "Asian American Artists and World War II" and to introduce the viewer to artists of Asian ancestry in America using Chang, Johnson & Karlstrom's text, Asian American Art: A History, 1850-1970 (2008), the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco's exhibition catalog "Asian/American/Modern Art: Shifting Currents, 1900-1970" (2008),the vast resources of the Smithsonian Learning Lab, Project Zero's Global Thinking Routines and other resources.  This collection is part two of four that I have organized, chronologically, on Asian American Art.  The other three collections are "Asian American Art: Emerging from the Shadows",  "Asian American Artists and World War II" and "Asian American Contemporary Art".  It is my hope that these collections will serve as entry points to understanding the many contributions of Asian American artists in the U.S. from 1850 until the present time.

Visual art is a language that is socially and culturally constructed.  Socially constructed learning values diverse perspectives, engages with local and global experts, and employs inquiry, discovery and exploration to move students toward global citizenship.  Because the visual arts leverage the power of dialogue and debate to sharpen critical thinking, starting with the arts is a logical place to help students develop cultural intelligence.

Other purposes of these collections are to explore tangible and intangible cultural heritage; as well as jumpstart brave conversations about race, identity and immigration in the U.S. with teachers, tutors of English Language Learners and others who are interested in becoming cultural leaders in our public schools.

As Gordon H. Chang and Mark Dean Johnson state in the introduction of the exhibition catalog, "Asian/American/Modern Art: Shifting Currents, 1900-1970" (2008):

"Forty years ago there were no Asian Americans.  There were Chinese, Japanese, Koreans, Filipinos, and others of Asian ancestry in the United States, but no 'Asian Americans,' as that term was coined only in 1968.  This population was commonly seen as foreign, alien, not of America.  Their lives and experiences were not generally accepted as part of the fabric of the country, even though Asians had begun settling here steadily in the mid-nineteenth century.

Then, in the late 1960s, as part of the upsurge in the self-assertion of marginalized communities,  'Asian America' emerged to challenge the stigma of perpetual foreignness.  'Asian American' was a claim of belonging, of rootedness, of pride and identity, and of history and community; it was also a recognition of distinctive cultural achievement"  (Chang, Johnson, 2008).

#APA2018

Rubina Pantoja
18
 

Asian American Artists and World War II

This collection is meant to build on "Asian American Art: Emerging from the Shadows" and to introduce the viewer to artists of Asian ancestry in America using Chang, Johnson & Karlstrom's text, Asian American Art: A History, 1850-1970 (2008), the vast resources of the Smithsonian Learning Lab, Project Zero's Global Thinking Routines and other resources.  This collection is part two of four that I have organized, chronologically, on Asian American Art.  The other three collections are "Asian American Art: Emerging from the Shadows",  "Asian American Modernism" and "Asian American Contemporary Art".  It is my hope that these collections will serve as entry points to understanding the many contributions of Asian American artists in the U.S. from 1850 until the present time.

Visual art is a language that is socially and culturally constructed.  Socially constructed learning values diverse perspectives, engages with local and global experts, and employs inquiry, discovery and exploration to move students toward global citizenship.  Because the visual arts leverage the power of dialogue and debate to sharpen critical thinking, starting with the arts is a logical place to help students develop cultural intelligence.

Other purposes of these collections are to explore tangible and intangible cultural heritage; as well as jumpstart brave conversations about race, identity and immigration in the U.S. with teachers, tutors of English Language Learners and others who are interested in becoming cultural leaders in our public schools.

"In the years before the American entry into World War II, many Chinese American artists, moved by the death and destruction caused by the Japanese invasion of China in the 1930s, depicted Japanese military atrocities in their artwork.  Yun Gee, Kem Lee, Nanying Stella Wong, and David P. Chun, among others, created anguishing images of Chinese suffering and Japanese military brutality.  These powerful images, though, had limited impact on the greater American public, whose attention was elsewhere.  Japanese American artists such as Hideo Date, Yasuo Kuniyoshi, and Isamu Noguchi also used their talents to condemn European and Japanese fascism and encourage American support for the Chinese victims of Japanese aggression.  But it was the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor in 1941 that established the indelible connection between art, race, and war for these and other Asian American artists."  (Chang, Johnson, Karlstrom, 2008).  

  #APA2018

Julie Sawyer
30
 

Asian American Art: "Emerging from the Shadows"

This collection is meant to build on "Socially Constructed Learning through Art" and to introduce the viewer to artists of Asian ancestry in America using Chang, Johnson & Karlstrom's text, Asian American Art: A History, 1850-1970 (2008), the vast resources of the Smithsonian Learning Lab, Project Zero's Global Thinking Routines and other resources.  This collection is part one of four that I have organized, chronologically, on Asian American Art.  The other three collections are "Asian American Artists and World War II",  "Asian American Modernism" and "Asian American Contemporary Art".  It is my hope that these collections will serve as entry points to understanding the many contributions of Asian American artists in the U.S. from 1850 until the present time.

Visual art is a language that is socially and culturally constructed.  Socially constructed learning values diverse perspectives, engages with local and global experts, and employs inquiry, discovery and exploration to move students toward global citizenship.  Because the visual arts leverage the power of dialogue and debate to sharpen critical thinking, starting with the arts is a logical place to help students develop cultural intelligence.

Other purposes of these collections are to explore tangible and intangible cultural heritage; as well as jumpstart brave conversations about race, identity and immigration in the U.S. with teachers, tutors of English Language Learners and others who are interested in becoming cultural leaders in our public schools.

In Asian American Art: A History, 1850-1970 (Chang, Johnson, Karlstrom, 2008), Gordon H. Chang writes about Asian American art "emerging from the shadows".  He asks, "Why has this treasure been outside our vision?"  Historically, those of Asian heritage faced discrimination in the United States.  For instance, the Chinese Exclusion Act of 1882 prevented Asian immigrants from entering the country.  In 1945, the U.S. government forced Japanese Americans to move to remote internment camps.  Most of these people of Japanese ancestry were U.S. citizens or legal residents and they were forced to abandon their homes and businesses until the war ended.  In 1965, the U.S. finally lifted the last of the immigration laws that overtly discriminated against Asians.  

Asian Americans are now the fastest-growing racial group in the U.S., outpacing both Latinos and African Americans.  In 2013, there were more than 17.3 million Asian Americans living in the U.S. -- 6% of the population.  

So although Asian Americans have been making and exhibiting art in the U.S. since 1850, why is it still so difficult to define the style or content of Asian American art?  We will come back to this question in each of the four collections.

For early Asian American art, as Chang states in his forward, "The fascination with modern abstraction and nonrepresentational art, especially after World War II, turned public eyes away from art that appeared to have social messages or overt ethnic connections.  Art produced by Asian Americans, other racial minorities, and women in America that displayed such markers now appeared nonmodern and was eclipsed by the interest in abstraction.  Art that reflected the quandary of exile (such as that suffered by Chinese diasporic artists -- Wang Ya-chen, Chang Shu-chi, and Chang Dai-chien, for example -- in the mid twentieth century), displacement (such as that experienced by artists who worked in the United States during the height of racial antagonism, such as Yun Gee or Chiura Obata), and persecution (the Japanese artists who suffered internment, Eitaro Ishigaki and others, hounded because of their political beliefs) fell out of fashion." 

#APA2018

Julie Sawyer
24
 

Artwork as Identity

An assignment for ESOL Level 4

mr.dater
2
 

Artists and Feminism

Women in mid-twentieth century and after made an enormous impact not only in arts, but also in literary forms.  

Matisse's Tea, which starts this collection shows the contrasting use of color, pattern, and line on Marguerite and Henriette creating a feeling of imbalance in the piece. This piece confronts the viewer with the tension between restraint and nature.

This tension is taken to  a different form in the artists displayed here.

Simone de Beauvoir, uses in promoting feminism, according to Simone de Beauvoir, women do not choose to think about their bodies and bodily processes negatively; rather they are forced to do so as a result of being embedded in a hostile patriarchal society. Andy Warhol , creator of Pop Art, used multiple images of American icon, Marilyn Monroe to produce art. 

Another artist, Judy Chicago wanted to demonstrate women's achievements through history in the collaborated installation The Dinner Party. Her goal was to ensure that this tribute to women becomes a permanent part of our cultural heritage.


bbridgette
6
 

Artifacts tell stories of the Encounter and Frontier

A collection of artifacts from which our students will choose an object of study for their first project cycle. Student swill be using historical, scientific, literary, mathematical and artistic techniques to help their chosen artifact tell a story of an encounter in history between two groups and/or cultures.

Andrew Meyers
47
 

Artifact Analysis

In this collection we explore the definition of an artifact and analyze various artifacts from multiple cultural periods.

Idaho State Museum
18
 

Artful Animals: Storytelling and Symbol

This student activity explores African animal symbolism through visual art and folktales. Twelve animals are profiled, including leopards, primates, spiders, chameleons, and the mythical chi wara. Includes objects, an audio folktale ('The Leopard’s Drum’), short answer questions, a creative writing exercise, and opportunities to learn more.

Tag: Africa

This collection was created to support the 2016 CCSSO Teachers of the Year Day at the Smithsonian.
Deborah Stokes
20
 

Artful Animals: Leadership

What traits make a good leader? What can we learn about ourselves by looking at our relationship with animals? This student activity explores these questions through animal symbolism in African art, focusing on an embroidered Fante “Cloth of the Great.” Includes multiple objects, short-answer questions, an mp3 of a folktale read aloud, and a creative writing activity.

Tag: Africa

This collection was created to support the 2016 CCSSO Teachers of the Year Day at the Smithsonian.
Deborah Stokes
14
 

Art reflecting Life

Art, posters and artifacts that reflect events and viewpoints changing over time. Make sure you refer back to the questions on canvas!

magough
7
 

Art as Resistance (2)

  • How may art be a tool of resistance? 
  • How have  historical movements used art to further their causes? 
  • How might current movements use art to further their causes?
Sher Anderson Petty
16
 

Art as Argument: Contemporary Artists' Voices

This collection explores the ways in which four American artists have used visual tools to share a message. In Amendment #8, Mark Bradford uses his layered paper and mixed media technique to challenge the viewer to consider how we are living up to the ideals of our founding documents. In Portrait of Mnonja, Mickalene Thomas references the art historical canon to address African American representation in museums. In Life Magazine, April 19, 1968, Alfredo Jaar manipulates a historical photograph to make visible the racial disparities it contains. And with her installation Folding the Chesapeake, Maya Lin begs us to see the critical importance of caring for the waterways around us. 

Created for an April 16, 2018 webinar with Montana teachers.

Phoebe Hillemann
11
 

Art and Technology Projects for Museums and Classrooms: From "Today I Am Here" to "Discovering US/Descubriéndonos"

This collection contains assets and resources designed to help teachers (art, English, ESOL, social studies, and media technology), museum educators, and community-based informal learning educators recreate their own "Today I Am Here" project, based on the specific needs of their classroom or learning community. 

"Today I Am Here" is a project in which students make a handmade book from one piece of paper, that tells the story of how they got to where they are today. This project is wonderful in a classroom to show the breadth and diversity of the class, and to encourage cross-cultural understanding. 

Inside you will find instructions and images for the various components of the project, as well as samples of student work. 

#LatinoHAC

Philippa Rappoport
14
 

Art & Resistance: Frederick Douglass

Why art & resistance in a novel study of The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass

  • This lesson may be used as a pre-reading activity for a study of the Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass.  My two year literature course begins junior year with the reading and interrogation of Douglass' Narrative.  
  • Students often have a limited view of the author, the historical context of 19th century America and especially the resistance against oppression and struggle for agency of racialized groups (like the kidnapped Africans who were stolen from their homes, trafficked and enslaved).  
  • This collection is designed to help students construct meaning around one of Douglass' many means of resistance to oppression by the careful curation of his image.

Why resistance?  

  • My rationale for centering our literature study on the concept of resistance was born from conversations with students last year that revealed their false beliefs that enslaved people (specifically the kidnapped and enslaved Africans trafficked and sold into the American Slave Trade) did not by and large resist.  There was large scale ignorance across all my classes of the scale of acts of resistance as well. 
  •  Additionally,I thought since my students are developmentally at a stage of differentiating themselves from their parents/ families (often looking like resistance to norms) that they would find relevance and resonance with a unit centered on resistance.

#goglobal #andersonpetty

Sher Anderson Petty
66
 

Art & Resistance 2: Black Women Subjects Free from the Gaze

Why art & resistance with Black women as subjects in a novel study of Beloved

  • This lesson may be used as a pre-reading and/ or during reading activity for a study of Toni Morrison's Beloved.  
  • The second of my eight quarter (2yr) literature course begins with the reading and critical interrogation of this Pulitzer Prize and American Book Award winning masterpiece.  
  • Since many learners carry the misperception that our world may be characterized as post-racial, they have a grossly limited view of how perceptions from so-called dominant groups may oppress racialized groups.  
  • This lesson/ collection is designed to help students construct meaning around the intersection of  Black women as creatives/ subjects in literature & art and the concept of the gaze (i.e. the white gaze in the literary canon).
  • For students who misperceive the small degree of diversity in the authors studied in their literature classes as post-racialism, it is important to acknowledge the space between where we presently are with respect where we aspire to be as prosumers of literature and art.
  • The impetus for continuing to center our literature study in resistance stems from out study of the works of Toni Morrison and her professional ethos that her "sovereignty & authority as a racialized person...be struck immediately" in her writing while  "...not  speak[ing] for Black people;...[but]..speak[ing] to and be[ing] among [black people]".  Her determination "to make sure that the white gaze was not the dominant one in any of [her] books" is an example of the importance and power of authentic creation.


#goglobal #andersonpetty #mgg #wissit2019 #tonimorrison #blackwomen

Sher Anderson Petty
53
 

Arguments to meditate: an introduction through American Art

This collection is for use with an introductory lesson for a 12th-grade rhetoric course's unit on "arguments to meditate," which are defined in the text "Everything's an Argument" by Andrea Lunsford and John Ruszkiewicz as, to paraphrase, those arguments which are abstract and/or which lack a clear, explicitly stated thesis and that therefore depend on thoughtful meditation by the audience to arrive at an understanding of the rhetorician's intent. The purpose of this lesson is to (1) establish students' understanding of the definition of an argument to meditate and (2) provide students with a beginning ability to assess the thesis and supporting ideas that comprise arguments to meditate in the form of American Art. The details of the lesson itself are included in a document within the collection.

#SAAMteach

Marshall Harris
10
 

Argument & Art

Understanding what makes a text effective in terms of rhetorical strategies in increasingly important for students, especially as the ACT/SAT writing exams become more analytical. By pairing a visual stimulus with a somewhat abstract, difficult-to-place concept such as that of Rhetoric, students should be able to more wholly understand what comprises and defines each canon and be able to apply the canons to a broad range of texts, both traditional and contemporary. 

#SAAMteach

Kimberly Siemsen
12
 

Are student rights protected in school?

This collection explores a number of Supreme Court cases all looking at the rights students have in the American public school system. Students will encounter these court cases through primary and secondary sources, videos, photographs, podcasts, and historical objects. At the end of the lesson, students should be able construct an argument based off the compelling question "Are student rights protected in school?"

Leah Knecht
16
 

Archives of American Art

Lists: To-dos, Illustrated Inventories, Collected Thoughts and Other Artists' Enumerations

Archives of American Art
62
 

Arachne

Visual representations related to the Greek myth of Arachne
Rosalyn Greene
5
 

APUSH WWI Propaganda

This student activity includes a variety of types of propaganda related to World War I. The United States government took great action when it came to World War I—they helped organize workers, recruit military members, and regulate the economy so that American could have a successful impact on the war. The Committee of Public Information formed by George Creel and other propaganda-producers used advertising techniques from businesses to make appeals to the average citizen and encourage them to make a difference. This assignment will ask you to connect each piece of propaganda to one of four major goals of the U.S. government during the war and to analyze a few specific pieces for author, audience, purpose, and even the medium/form.

Essential questions include:

  • What are the four main goals of the government during World War I?
  • Why and how did propaganda creators target specific audiences with their messages?
  • What are the effects of changing the medium or form of propaganda on how it might be received?

Tags: World War I, WWI, selective service, draft, liberty bonds, propaganda, music, Uncle Sam, persuasive writing, cause effect

Molly Chester
14
649-672 of 746 Collections