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Found 6,881 Collections

 

American Indian Movement and the Traditional Way of Life

These resources provide examples of the role of traditions in the American Indian Movement and how American Indians have attempted to keep their traditional way of life viable. #ethnicstudies

Kip Harmon
8
 

American Indian Heritage Month Resources

These classroom resources from different Smithsonian museums focus on American Indian history and culture. 


Philippa Rappoport
11
 

American Indian Culture and Rights

#ethnicstudies

Meridith Manis
9
 

American Indian and Black Civil Rights: A Shared Legacy

This is a topical collection concerning Civil Rights activism led by the American Indian Movement (AIM) and the Black Panther Party. It includes photographs, videos, and documentation from both movements. The imagery in this collection addresses the shared legacy of American Indian and Black resistance efforts in the 20th century. It also shows the continued impact of these efforts and their modern reflections, like ongoing Indigenous led efforts against the Dakota Access Pipeline (DAPL) and Black Lives Matter.

This collection includes remarkable figures in both AIM and the BPP, like Russell Means (Oglala Lakota) and Angela Davis. The daily lives of those whom AIM and BPP stood up for is also addressed.

This collected was created and organized by Kenlontae' Turner, a visual artist and gallery coordinator, during his time as an intern at NMAI. Some additional context and editing was provided by Maria Ferraguto to support his work during her time time as an intern at NMAI. 

Maria Ferraguto
60
 

American Independence

The American Independence plays a crucial role, not only in America's history but also in the world history. The establishment of "The United States of America" was the first step towards the creation of one of the most powerful countries of the world. I also believe, as citizens of this country, each one of us should be aware of the circumstances that led to the conception of this nation. In this project. This is essential to appreciate the growth that the USA has gone through in the short span of over 200 years. It also draws a contrast between the life style and standard of living in the 1700s and our current lifestyle and standard of living. 

The first few items in the collection are the reason behind the American decision to declare Independence from the British. Then we will look at the two major components of American Independence: The American Revolution and the Declaration of Independence. 

Vinaya Namboodiri
12
 

American Immigration

Nelson Bolima
7
 

American History: Unstacked

UNSTACKED is a wonderful way to spark inquiry, analysis, and discussion. By visually exploring our images, you can bring the Smithsonian Libraries' collections into your classroom. Use UNSTACKED as a morning exercise, a way to introduce a new topic, or to discover your students' interests. Picture your world, dive into the stacks! 

Smithsonian Libraries
10
 

American history collection

This collection is about American histories. As you see this collection, you'll find out many different events occurred in American histories.

Woobin Jun
15
 

American Foundations

#NPGteach  Portraits of Early American Leaders

Elizabeth Corcoran
4
 

American Flag/Washington DC Flag Lesson, One or Two Part

With this collection, students will use a version of the Zoom In thinking routine to analyze several flags with an eye toward creating their own flag at the end of the lesson.

The Guiding Questions used in this lesson are:

-How did the United States flag change over time?

-Why do countries feel that it's important to have a single flag?

The Big Idea for this lesson is:

Simple symbols, like the those presented on flags, can represent a lot about a country's past and what makes that country unique.  

In this lesson, students will begin by exploring the collection and answering, using the quiz tool,  the questions embedded about the two early versions of the American flag.  The questions push students to analyze each flag, consider how versions of the American flag changed, and think critically about how symbolism can be used in a flag to represent unique and/or historical aspects of a country. 

Once students have completed the quiz questions, the teacher will call them together to discuss  the evolution of the American flag and what the elements of the flag's current and former designs represent.  The teacher will then turn the class's attention to the Washington DC flag and reiterate that its design was taken from George Washington's English ancestry.  Using this as another example of a flag drawing upon elements of history, the teacher will  make the point that the DC flag hasn't changed in appearance in over 80 years.  

The class will brainstorm what they feel are the most important and/or interesting aspects of DC history based on what they have studied.  They will then brainstorm symbols that could be used to abstractly represent elements of DC's unique past, status, and culture.  

Once a number of good ideas have been generated, each student will have the chance to create their own version of the DC flag, either modifying the exiting version of creating a completely new design.  On the draft sheets will be a checklist that focus's students attention on the  most important aspects of any flag, namely its symbolism and its connection to the history of the place it represents.  

If the teacher wishes to make this a longer activity featuring multiple drafts, he or she can consider looping in the art teacher to discuss concepts of sketching and design.  

#LearnwithTR



Peter Gamber
5
 

AMERICAN EXPERIMENTS Where Do You Stand? Voting

This collection contains supplemental artifacts and resources for Where Do You Stand? VOTING, part of the American Experiments suite of educational resources from the National Museum of American History.  

These interactive resources and games challenge students to think about their roles and responsibilities within their democracy. Where Do You Stand? VOTING invites students to critically think about the nuances and complexities of issues and learn from the experiences and reasoning of their peers as they form their own opinions and responses to a range of prompts. The learning begins with the guiding question: What does voting mean to you?

Visit Smithsonian's History Explorer to learn more!  

#historicalthinking

National Museum of American History
29
 

AMERICAN EXPERIMENTS Where Do You Stand? Protest

This collection contains supplemental artifacts and resources for Where Do You Stand? PROTEST, part of the American Experiments suite of educational resources from the National Museum of American History.  

These interactive resources and games challenge students to think about their roles and responsibilities within their democracy. Where Do You Stand? PROTEST invites students to critically think about the nuances and complexities of issues and learn from the experiences and reasoning of their peers as they form their own opinions and responses to a range of prompts. The learning begins with the guiding question: What would you do to support what you believe in? 

Visit Smithsonian's History Explorer to learn more!  

#historicalthinking

National Museum of American History
14
 

AMERICAN EXPERIMENTS Ideals and Images

This collection contains supplemental artifacts and resources for Ideals and Images, part of the American Experiments suite of educational resources from the National Museum of American History.  

These interactive resources and games challenge students to think about their roles and responsibilities within their democracy. Ideals and Images invites students to share their own understandings of and perspectives on core American concepts, through a playful and thought provoking dialogue-based game. The learning begins with the guiding questions: Do Americans have shared ideals? What do they look like? 

Visit Smithsonian's History Explorer to learn more!  

National Museum of American History
4
 

AMERICAN EXPERIMENTS Head to Head: History Makers

This collection contains supplemental artifacts and resources for Head to Head: History Makers, part of the American Experiments suite of educational resources from the National Museum of American History.  

These interactive resources and games challenge students to think about their roles and responsibilities within their democracy. Head to Head invites students to think deeply about how American history has been shaped by in innumerable ways by people in different eras and from diverse backgrounds. The learning begins with the guiding question: Who changed America more?

Visit Smithsonian's History Explorer to learn more! 

National Museum of American History
158
 

American Experience: Unstacked

UNSTACKED is a wonderful way to spark inquiry, analysis, and discussion. By visually exploring our images, you can bring the Smithsonian Libraries' collections into your classroom. Use UNSTACKED as a morning exercise, a way to introduce a new topic, or to discover your students' interests. Picture your world, dive into the stacks! 

Smithsonian Libraries
9
 

American Enterprise: Corporate Era (Great Depression, New Deal)

During the Corporate Era, the United States experienced its most serious economic crisis; in response, political leaders intervened in the economy in innovative ways. In this collection, you’ll explore life during the Great Depression and evaluate New Deal policies by participating in a learning activity the teacher specifies.
Zach Etsch
5
 

American Democracy

In conjunction with the Smithsonian Institutions Traveling Exhibition Services - American Democracy: A Great Leap of Faith exhibition

More than just waging a war of independence, American revolutionaries took a great leap of faith and established a new government based on the sovereignty of the people. It was truly a radical idea that entrusted the power of the nation not in a monarchy but in its citizens. Each generation since continues to question how to form "a more perfect union" around this radical idea.

Emma Garten
66
 

American Culture Changed by Basketball

Example collection of the impact basketball has played on development of culture in America.

James Klipa
22
 

American Constitution

vnvbnv ngnvf
5
 

American Colonies and Native Americans Musical Hobbies

During the colonial era in the United States, American Colonists and Native Americans, worked every single day if it is either with agriculture or as a merchant.   

Not only did people worked hard every day in their lives in America, they also had fun in many ways. Music is one of the many ways they enjoyed their past time. Colonists and Native Americans alike had their own ways in playing music.

Native Americans where the first people to inhabit the United States. They have done many things like constructing their tribes, going to war with other tribes, hunt, and help grow their agricultural lands. There are also ways they enjoyed their past times, for example music. In the artifacts of this collection show how Native Americans interacted with their environment, the type of instruments they used to play music, and how they played music.

Colonists, like Native Americans, also had to work. Some colonists were indentured servants working for many years to pay off their debt to someone.  Other colonists were farmers merchants, plantation owners, or blacksmiths. Each had to work hard for them and their family, but they enjoyed music in their free time. The artifacts in the collection shows the type of instruments they used, which are different form what the Native Americans use, and musical pieces they might have played at that time.

Yailin Pena-Martinez
12
 

american civil war history project

This collection is of a group of key points and "collections" of what made up the civil war.

Ashley Walker
10
 

American Civil War Battle of Gettysburg Historic Photo Analysis

Using the photos in this collection, students will work to answer analysis questions about the Civil War and the Battle of Gettysburg. Some of the photos in this collection are 3D. Students can use the the blue and red 3D glasses to see the images as they were meant to be viewed in the 1860's.  

Thomas Gray
29
 

American Children's Relics of 1700-1800s

This collection showcases furniture, clothing, paintings, etc. that represent the American children of the 1700-1800s. This period exhibits the transition time between being considered a 2nd class citizen living in a British colony to learning what it means to be an American. The American Revolution lasted from 1775 to 1783 ultimately ending in a victory for the patriots. With the war won and independence gained, America took her first steps into a journey of discovery. 

The first object in this collection starts from the beginning (or a little before) the Revolution and the last items is documented around 1859, well into American culture growing and forming into it's own. Specifically, the items here focus on the lives of the children of this historic moment that may not even understand the revolution going on around them. The objects reflect British influence and American pioneering. These relic grasp the material culture of the first generation of children that were born "Americans."

Heidi Chong
11
6337-6360 of 6,881 Collections