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Found 6,884 Collections

 

An Introduction to Japanese Painting

This collection was designed by the Education Department of the Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery as a basic introduction to Japanese painting for educators. It is a collection of artworks from the museum's permanent collection that draw from a wide variety of formats, styles, media, and subjects that represent many of the major trends in Japanese painting. Each image includes key information about the artwork, as well as ideas for class discussion, lesson components, and/or links to resources such as videos and articles which provide additional information about the artwork. Feel free to copy the collection and adapt it to your own use. 

Keywords: Buddha, Hokusai, Mount Fuji, watercolor, bodhisattva, Fugen, Sōtatsu, cherry blossoms, seasons, Genji, crane, emakibyobukakemono, ukiyo-e, map, teacher, student, autumn, Japan, Japanese art, landscape, Edo period, Buddhism, Heian period, water, ocean, wave, boat, flower, insect, Muromachi period, river, surimono



Freer and Sackler Galleries
12
 

An Introduction to Hawai'ian Lei Making

All Polynesians have a history of making and giving of lei. From early times, Hawaiians have fashioned lei from shells, seeds, bone, and feathers and from more temporary materials such as leaves, vines, and a few indigenous flowers. Colorful flowers and greenery are braided, twisted, wrapped, or strung together to create lei for the neck, head, wrists and ankles. Lei are made and given for marriages, birthdays, luaus, and funerals. Leis are also given on informal occasions to express gratitude or warmth of friendship. In this collection, you’ll learn how to make your own lei and explore other examples of leis made from a variety of natural materials.
Ashley Naranjo
6
 

An Evolution of Expression

The eclectic and time-honored art form of quilting has been used as a material expression of ideologies, social stances, and culture. Though the basic process of quilting involves the sewing of two or more layers of fabric, quilters have increasingly integrated materials, symbols, words, and individual styles with communicative, celebratory, and decorative intentions.

This collection displays digitized images of quilts that reflect the diversity of the quilting tradition in America. Some quilts have been displayed at the National Museum of African American History and Culture and others at the National Museum of the American Indian. The Smithsonian’s National Quilt Collection is housed at the National Museum of American History. 

This collection includes an article that explores the evolution and artistry of quilting and a list of discussion questions that can be used to analyze the collection.

Keywords: African American, NMAAHC, American History, Quilts

Le'Passion Darby
9
 

An 11 year old's Letter and Lincoln's Beard

This teaching collection includes videos, portraits and lesson plans from the National Portrait Gallery and the National Museum of American History. During Abraham Lincoln's campaign to become president, an 11-year-old girl named Grace Bedell wrote a letter suggesting he grow a beard to gain more votes. Of course, Lincoln's beard became iconic in imagery during his Presidency and throughout the Civil War.

Ashley Naranjo
11
 

Amy Wu's Collection

Cooper Hewitt Design Scholars
34
 

Amy Wang 1920s and 1930s Artifacts

To learn more about what happen in 1920s and 1930s

Amy Wang
7
 

Amphibians and Reptiles: Unstacked

UNSTACKED is a wonderful way to spark inquiry, analysis, and discussion. By visually exploring our images, you can bring the Smithsonian Libraries' collections into your classroom. Use UNSTACKED as a morning exercise, a way to introduce a new topic, or to discover your students' interests. Picture your world, dive into the stacks! 

Smithsonian Libraries
11
 

Americans in WWII battles

Jaacob Wiggins
10
 

Americanization - Impact on American Indians and Immigrants (1860-1920)

This collection includes before and after images of American Indians and Immigrants who have been"Americanized."

Melanie Kirchhof
7
 

American/Colonial Music from the 18th Century

The 18th century in the colonies was a time filled with war and turmoil, so one would think that the arts would take a back seat to all the bloodshed. While war was at the forefront of the century, music still played a vital role in people's lives. 

Because of Americas colonial status with Britain, a lot of music was from the U.K., but as the nation became more independent, native composers began creating music. The first native composer was even a signer of the Declaration of Independence, Francis Hopkins. George Washington himself pronounced him as the first American composer. Hymns were important to early American music. 

Because music tends to parallel currents events in society, we see war affecting early American music. Many of the early American musicians wrote about war and war figures like George Washington. Besides war, religion also was relevant in society which therefore means it was relevant in music.

The second American composer, James Lyon, wrote many hymns, anthems, and psalms. But hymns and psalms were about all that was tolerated in much of early America. Religion was actually one of the biggest inhibitors of music in the 18th century with many colonies prohibiting music in their towns. Puritans in New England, for example, banned musical interments and only allowed singing if it was worship. This also followed in colonies within Pennsylvania, New York, and the South who may have been more openminded, but still felt uncomfortable with secular music. This was shown in the Quaker denomination who had problems with all forms of artistic expression whether it be dancing, music, or theater.

From religion to war, we see how early American music weaved itself into current societal events.  

Source: 

http://www.americanmusicpreser...

Austin Hale
10
 

American's Way of Displaying Mourning in the 18th Century to Mid 19th Century

In this collection, we will analyze different ways colonial Americans coped with death, particularly with attire and art. Attire is comprised of black or dark clothing to jewelry while art includes miniature portraits and embroidery which were both used to mourn. Mourning is a way for an individual to help themselves recover and to show the deceased respect. In colonial times, it began to be popular to show grievance socially. At first, mourning attire and art was a way for elites to socially show their grievance for their loved ones and for their loved ones to show what comes next for them. Through a social shift, mourning attire and art became more open for middle class people to show their grievance and to celebrate the deceased life. Moreover, women were often socially required to mourn. Women would frequently wear black gowns for a few months while men tended to wear minimal clothing for a shorter period of time. After a few months, women were allowed to wear shades of gray to white (A Cheerful and Comfortable Faith, 161). Furthermore, not only was clothing a part of mourning, but often colonists would wear jewelry to help them mourn. Jewelry includes necklaces, brooches, rings, and more. Mourning jewelry became popular originally in the 18th Century England where it quickly transferred to colonial America (Sentimental Cuts, 1).

Yaroslava Boyko
10
 

American Whaling Industry

In the early nineteenth century, America demanded a clean burning fuel that would supplant the candle as the primary tool for lighting in homes and businesses. Whale oil proved to be the answer. It was clean burning, odorless and more economical than candles. Hunting whales was adventurous and dangerous and it lured many young men to a life at sea. Whaling remained an important industry through the Civil War and began to decline with the discovery of oil and its by products at Drake's well and other sites in Western Pennsylvania.

Arthur Glaser
30
 

American Weapons During the Revolutionary Era

The Revolution in the 1700's brought innovations to the American colonies. Because of this, America was able to endure hardships and adapted to resist the British by taking their technologies, along with a variety of French and Native American technologies, and refurbishing them to fit the American ideal.  America had become immensely dependent on the British throughout the 18th century, that it was a struggle for the people of America to strive for independence, as gathering natural resources was a challenge and learning to craft their own supplies was an additional skill the people were required to learn; as before, the British would simply import their goods into America for people to purchase. Another major resource that America lacked was experienced soldiers. The vast majority of Americans fighting in the Revolutionary War were simple townspeople who were drafted or volunteered, meaning that the army's skills would not be as polished as the British and would be required to figure out clever ways to win battles with tactics such as guerrilla warfare. They used the fact that the soldiers were extraordinarily unorganized they could successfully confuse the proper, formulated British armies to be victorious. Tactics such as these, combine with pure American craftsmanship was what brought America to its freedom and shaped the America we witness today.

Katherine Holcombe
10
 

American Transcendentalism

Transcendentalism is a philosophy that is rooted in the belief that man is inherently good but has been corrupted by society. Self reliance, self improvement, and peaceful protest were some methods practiced to reverse this effect. 

Linked in this collection are examples of the movement's influence in society, writings, and art.

Katie ODell
10
 

American Transcendentalism

This collection contains artwork, photography, and more that are indicative of the American movement of Transcendentalism.

Jacob Carlson
11
 

American stereotype: All Black Pilgrim Attire

Every year near Thanksgiving, images of our Pilgrims father begin to proliferate showing them as very austere and wearing only black clothing. This learning lab introduces images of Pilgrims that are compared with written primary sources. It was customary in the 17th century to inventory all the belongings of the deceased before they were distributed to the heirs. These inventories and the wills themselves provide detailed information about the attire of everyday Pilgrims of this period.

Arthur Glaser
21
 

American Schoolhouses

Andrea Ahlert Scroggy
42
 

american revolutionary war coin

project
Matthew Muldowney
10
 

american revolutionary war

revolutionary war

dakota redich
4
 

American Revolution: Western & Southern Campaign

This Smithsonian Learning Lab Collection coincides with the EFMS: The War Moves South website. Students will navigate the website and investigate the following topics:

  • US Navy & Privateers
  • The gunboat Philadelphia
  • Native Americans & the American Revolution
  • Southern Campaign
  • Aid from Spain
Students will utilize this Smithsonian Learning Lab Collection to complete a blog question on the aforementioned website.
Steven Hartnett
7
 

American Revolution, Investigation 2, Retellings of History

This collection is intended to follow a study of the major events of the American Revolution. Students will examine different artistic interpretations of the American Revolution in order to consider how events are portrayed differently based on the author's perspective. In this study the following goals are targeted: 

Big Ideas: 

  • We must be alert, questioning, and thoughtful readers of history. 
  • All retelling of history is an interpretation. 
  • Historical context is critical for understanding artifacts and historical interpretations. 
  • History is multifaceted and can be understood differently from multiple perspectives. 
  • Historical events are connected to current events.

Expert Thinking: 

  • Analyze primary and secondary sources for relevant historical details.
  • Synthesize details to understand the story of America’s founding.
  • Explain and analyze cause and effect relationships across historical events. 
  • Interpret history using a variety of sources and understanding of perspectives, including: personal stories, events, and factual knowledge.

Guiding Questions: 

  • What criteria should be used to evaluate a historical interpretation? 
  • Why is a single source insufficient for understanding a period of history?

Standards: 

  • SSA.3. Students explain how the present is connected to the past, identifying both similarities and differences between the two, and how some things change over time and some things stay the same. 
  • SSA.5. Students distinguish cause from effect and identify and interpret the multiple causes and effects of historical events
  • CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.5.5 Compare and contrast the overall structure (e.g., chronology, comparison, cause/effect, problem/solution) of events, ideas, concepts, or information in two or more texts.
  • CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.5.6 Analyze multiple accounts of the same event or topic, noting important similarities and differences in the point of view they represent.
  • CCSS.ELA.LITERACY.RL.5.4 Interpret words and phrases as they are used in a text, including determining technical, connotative, and figurative meanings, and analyze how specific word choices shape meaning or tone.

#LearnwithTR

Kathryn Mancino
9
 

American Revolution, Investigation 1, Events of the Revolution

This collection is intended to accompany a study of the major events of the American Revolution. In this study the following goals are targeted: 

Big Ideas: 

  • We must be alert, questioning, and thoughtful readers of history. 
  • All retelling of history is an interpretation. 
  • Historical context is critical for understanding artifacts and historical interpretations. 
  • History is multifaceted and can be understood differently from multiple perspectives. 
  • Historical events are connected to current events.

Expert Thinking: 

  • Analyze primary and secondary sources for relevant historical details.
  • Synthesize details to understand the story of America’s founding.
  • Explain and analyze cause and effect relationships across historical events. 
  • Interpret history using a variety of sources and understanding of perspectives, including: personal stories, events, and factual knowledge.

Guiding Questions: 

  • What forces affect historical change? (i.e. people, events, and ideas)
  • What are the important historical facts in the American Revolution? 
  • What events led to the American Revolution?

Standards: 

Section 1:  Colonial America and the French and Indian War

  • 4.7.1. Locate and identify the first 13 colonies and explain how their location and natural environment influenced their development. 
  • 4.7.10. Explain how the British colonial period created the basis for the development of political self-government and a free-market economic system. 
  • 4.8.2 Explain how political, religious, and economic ideas and interests brought about the Revolution. 

Section 2: Conflicting Interests 

  • 4.8.2 Explain how political, religious, and economic ideas and interests brought about the Revolution (e.g., resistance to imperial policy, the Stamp Act, the Townshend Acts, taxes on tea, and Coercive Acts). 
  • 4.8.3. Describe the significance of the First and Second Continental Congresses and of the Committees of Correspondence.

Section 3: Declaring Independence 

  • 4.8.4. Identify the people and events associated with the drafting and signing of the Declaration of Independence and the document’s significance, including the key political concepts it embodies, the origins of those concepts, and its role in severing ties with Great Britain. 
  • 4.9.6. Explain how the ideals set forth in the Declaration of Independence changed the way people viewed slavery.

Section 4: The Revolution, Briefly 

  • 4.9 Describe the course and consequences of the American Revolution. 
  • 4.9.1. Locate and identify the major military battles, campaigns, and turning points of the Revolutionary War. 
  •  4.9.2. Understand the roles of the American and British leaders, and the Indian leaders’ alliances on both sides. 
  • 4.9.3. Understand the roles of African Americans, including their alliances on both sides (especially the case of Lord Dunmore’s Proclamation and its impact on the war).

Section 5: Building the New Nation 

  • 4.10. Students describe the people and events associated with the development of the U.S. Constitution. 
  • 4.10.1. Describe the significance of the new Constitution of 1787, including the struggles over its ratification and the reasons for the Bill of Rights.  
  • 4.10.2. Describe the direct and indirect (or enabling) statements of the conditions on slavery in the Constitution and their impact on the emerging U.S. nation-state. 
  • 4.10.3. Describe how the Constitution is designed to secure our liberty by both empowering and limiting central government. 
  • 4.10.4. Understand the meaning of the American creed that calls on citizens to safeguard the liberty of individual Americans within a unified nation, to respect the rule of law, and to preserve the Constitution.

Usage: 

These artifacts are intended to provide students with a consistent opportunity to examine historical artifacts in order to make observations and connections to events of the time period. it is suggested that students examine 1-2 items at a time on a regular basis in order to evaluate each item as a historical source using a See-Think-Wonder routine. 

#LearnwithTR



Kathryn Mancino
27
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