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Found 807 Collections

 

Gatsby - (specifically) Valley of the Ashes

This is a pictorial collection of what the "Valley of the Ashes," from Chapter 2 of "The Great Gatsby," might look like. It is used for a Chapter 2 review and discussion. (Please see the attached short answer questions and assignment.) 

Annette Spahr
4
 

Rebel Without A Cause/ Fruitvale Station

This is my collection of images that connect with this film pairing,

ms.hughesteachesenglish
43
 

NATURE: Who Lives in the Trees?

Talk with Me!

Having conversations with young children contributes to their thinking and language development. All conversations are good, but research shows that the quality of words children hear matters more than the quantity. Further, what’s best is an exchange; in other words, talk with children, not at them.

The Talk with Me Toolkits give parents and caregivers thematically organized high-quality, authentic materials to make children their conversational partners in discussions that matter. Each online toolkit features captivating videos and real-world photographs, as well as intriguing paintings and other artworks to observe and discuss through conversation prompts.  Hands-on activities and books complete each toolkit. Simple instructions appear right in the toolkits, so you can jump right in. See what interests your child and get started. There’s a lot to talk about!

To read more, see, from the Harvard Graduate School of Education’s Usable Knowledge site, The Brain-Changing Power of Conversation.

Talk With Me Toolkit
20
 

Indian Education Media Arts Integration

Collection of Native American Ledger Art and drawings on hides. 

Would be used with other resources on modern Ledger Art being created today, as well as the history of ledger art and hide paintings in Plains Indian cultures. 

Kendall Griggs
11
 

FCPS Middle School English/Language Arts

Artworks aligned with concept-based units:

  1. Outside Influence
  2. Friendship & Relationships
  3. Resiliency
  4. The Impact of Choices
  5. Changing the World
  6. Competition and Challenge
  7. Overcoming Obstacles
  8. Survival & Dystopia
  9. Why Stories Matter
  10. Identity
Elizabeth Dale-Deines
94
 

FCPS High School English/Language Arts

Artworks grouped according to concept-based units:

  1. Role in  the Community
  2. Change & Transition
  3. Perspectives
  4. Self-Discovery
  5. Persuasion & Consumerism
  6. Art & Aesthetics
  7. Power
  8. Hope
  9. Innovation & Progress
  10. Alienation
Elizabeth Dale-Deines
86
 

Daniel Boone and American Ginseng: Truth and Legend

Who was Daniel Boone? Was he more than a stereotypical American frontier hero? Explore Daniel Boone and his relationship to the native plant, ginseng, through this collection and series of activities. 

Daniel Boone (1734-1820) spent much of his adult life blazing trails through the American wilderness. Through exploration and opening the wilderness, Boone and others were able to exploit its many rich resources, including the profitable plant American ginseng. He rose to the status of American legend, becoming known as someone who braved hardship and danger to bring the earth's resources to the market. The legend of Daniel Boone and his-lost-ginseng illustrates the way such stories can reflect historical fact. But become exaggerated or distorted through many generations of story tellers, and, now, via the internet. History and fiction become intertwined. 

While the days of American pioneers are long gone, people still search for and gather wild ginseng in the mountainous regions that Boone frequented. Learn more about Boone's adventures and American ginseng throughout this collection. Be sure to click the Information icon to learn more about each item. 

To learn more about Daniel Boone and his efforts to explore the wilderness, visit the Learning Lab collection -The Wilderness Road- .

Julia Eanes
25
 

Native American Children in Art

Elementary Classroom Collection 

See - Think - Wonder

Debbie Hagan
17
 

Exploring Food in Basque Culture

Get hungry while you explore the unique and delicious traditions of the Basque people through food. 

BasqueMuseumBoise
3
 

Cat's Cradle (Kurt Vonnegut)

Annette Spahr
17
 

Teaching The Great Gatsby with Informational Texts

#SAAMteach

This collection complements teaching The Great Gatsby using the lens of economics. Informational texts provide foundation for questions like: why should we care about economic inequality?



Cristi Marchetti
28
 

Gender

#SAAMteach

Cristi Marchetti
13
 

Exploring identity - Japan and the Western culture

Using "See, Think, Wonder" and "Parts, Perspective, me", this collection explores how cultural shock influences the way artists see themselves or are perceived by others. The careful analysis of 100 Pounds of Rice by the artist Saeri Kiritani provides an opportunity for students to reflect on the similarities and differences with the novel Fear and Trembling by the Belgian author Amelie Nothomb. It also invites students to reflect on their own cultural identity.

Time- 1 or 2 class periods with optional homework and extension activities

Guiding Questions:

  • How do art and literature shape our understanding of cultures?
  • What kind of knowledge about a literary text and about art do we gain when we compare and contrast them?
  • How does language in art and literature represent cultural distinctions and identities?

Context:

In Fear and trembling, Amélie, who is the main character of this autobiographical novel, shares her struggles as a foreign employee in a big Japanese corporation where she is confronted with Japanese protocols and habits that are culturally new to her. In her story, Japanese culture is exposed through a foreign perspective. The aim of the collection is to bring a different perspective to our study, these of a Japanese women living in the US, in order to build a better intercultural understanding of the Japanese culture.

Prior knowledge:

Students have read the novel Fear and Trembling and analysed the way Western and Japanese cultures are perceived by the different characters. They have explored how the autobiographical novel offers insights on the Japanese workplace culture and reflected on its limitations (a single story embedded in fiction). This teaching unit can be done without the comparative component of literature. It can also be adapted to any other literary work that explores the topic of identity. 

Day 1:

Step 1: Have them do "See, Think, Wonder"individually with 100 Pounds of Rice by Saeri Kiritani. Do not show the caption to students yet. The "See, Think, Wonder" routine is good to help students pay attention to details and unveil the artist's choices. It also encourages them to initiate a first interpretation.

Step 2: Debrief as a whole group- Discuss the self portrait of  Saeri Kiritani. 

Step 3: Show the Saeri Kiritani 's youtube video

Once students have discussed the sculpture, show them the video and ask them to take notes on the new information the artist provides.

Next, go back and look at the sculpture and see how their understanding has shifted from their initial interpretation.

Step 4: Read the caption

Have students read the caption and answer the questions of the Design Thinking routine "Parts, Perspectives, Me". The routine encourages students to consider the various viewpoints of an object, its users, and stakeholders, and reflect on their own connections and involvement with it. It helps them connect with the perspectives taken in the novel as they are complementary, yet different. It also lead them to reflect on their own identity and prepares them for possible extensions to the activity. 

Step 5: Debrief the questions as a group

Day 2 or Homework

Step 6: Have them write an individual synthesis:

  • What did I learn about Saeri Kiritani self-portrait? Fear and trembling? Me?
  • How do Saeri Kiritani and Amelie Nothomb express how they experience cultural differences?
  • What are the similarity and differences between them? How does it impact your understanding?

Step 7: Debrief in pair or small group, then as a whole group

Extensions

Creative project: 

Step 1 - Once they have completed these activities, ask them:

  • What material or fabric would better represent who you are? Why?
  • What part of you would better represent who you are? Why?

Step 2 - Debrief in group - reflect on the idea of cultural stereotypes: what role do cultural stereotypes play in the construction of self-identity? To what extent do cultural stereotypes limit or facilitate self-identification? Identification of others?

Step 3 - Have them sculpt their self-representation with the material of their choice.

Step 4 - Exhibition and presentation of the creative process.




Anne Leflot
7
 

Women of Japan

Time- 2 class periods

Description:

Using the Project Zero Design Thinking routines  "Parts, People, Interaction", this activity provides an understanding of the system of gender power at stake in the representation of Chapter 34 of Tales of Genji - Kashiwagi catches sight of the third Princess.  It then looks at a modernization of the illustrations and offers a reflection on what the new feminine contemporary perspective brings to the interpretation of the Third princess story. 

In exploring the representations of the tales of Genji, students have the opportunity to discover tales that have become a standard for Japanese culture. They look at the first known literature piece written by a woman, who shares a rare and intimate perspective of a woman on a world governed by men.  Students compare the representation of the tales from the XVIth century with one from the XXth century to identify in what ways they have been interpreted.

Day 1:

Step 1: Have students sketch The tale of Genji, chapter 34; Kashiwagi catches sight of the third Princess

Step 2: Debrief as a whole group

Discuss what the students have noticed.  Do not show the caption to the students yet. The observational drawing is good to help students pay attention to details and unveil the artist's choices. It also encourages them to initiate a first interpretation.

Step 3: Parts, People, Interaction

Once students have discussed the painting, guide them through the routine "Parts, People, Interaction". 

"This thinking routine helps students slow down and look closely at a system ( here the system of gender power.) In doing so, young people are able to situate objects within systems and recognize the various people who participate—either directly or indirectly—within a particular system. 

Students also notice that a change in one aspect of the system may have both intended and unintended effects on another aspect of the system. When considering the parts, people, and interactions within a system, young people begin to notice the multitude of subsystems within systems. 

This thinking routine helps stimulate curiosity, raises questions, surfaces areas for further inquiry, and introduces systems thinking." (PZ)

Step 4: Read the PDF "More about Chapter 34" and go back to the questions 

Have students read the caption, go back and look at the painting and ask them to take notes on how their understanding has shifted from their initial interpretation.

Step 5: Debrief the "Parts, People and Interaction" routine as a whole group:

During the discussion, here are some specific question students may want to address:  

  • What does the illustration of Chapter 34, Kashiwagi catches sight of the third Princess says about the system of power gender in place at the Japanese court in the XIth century? 
  • To what extent the architecture in the painting play a role in facilitating the superiority of men? 
  • How does the system in place impact relationship between men and women?

Day 2:

Step 1: "See, Think, Wonder" - The third princess with her pet cat, Yamato Maki, 1987

Have them do a quick "See, Think, Wonder" to encourages them to reactivate prior knowledge, pay attention to details and reflect on the effects of the modernization of the illustration of The tales of Genji though manga. Identify the audience and the context of the illustration.

Step 2: Read the caption as a group - notice what is important.

Step 3: "Layers"

This routine will encourage students to refine their first analysis of the illustration by looking at it through different angles (Aesthetic, Mechanical, Connections, Narrative, Dynamic). It will allow them to draw upon their prior knowledge and consider the impact of modernization of art on the public. 

Students can work in small group and cover between 3 and 5 of the categories.

Step 4: Each group of students present their learning to the class 


Anne Leflot
7
 

Harlem Renaissance: Style and Subject

This collection is meant to be used as an introductory activity to the novel Their Eyes Were Watching God by Zora Neale Hurston. Specifically, it focuses on the different styles employed by artist Aaron Douglas, most notably in his Scottsboro Boys portrait and in his 1925 self-portrait. In doing so, it asks students to consider when and why an artist who is more than capable of creating within the boundaries of classically beautiful art or writing might chose to create in this style at some times and at other times to create in more radical or avante-garde styles. It uses a Compare and Contrast looking technique before revealing to students that all four distinct pieces are created by the same artist. 

Ideally, teachers can end the unit by facilitating discussion of the social change Douglas aims for with his Scottsboro portrait and of the bridge that Hurston creates with her prose narrator before launching into the dialect of her characters that earned her such scorn from the African American community of her era.

This collection was created in conjunction with the National Portrait Gallery's 2019 Learning to Look Summer Teacher Institute.

#NPGteach

Lindsay Van Loon
11
 

Behind every great man is a woman! Looking at the role the First Lady plays.

Opening:  Class Discussion:  What is a portrait?  What are the Elements of Portrayal?

Show Michelle Obama Portrait- Have students work in pairs to come up with a list of things the artist wants us to know about the sitter.

Discuss answers

Read Washington Post article - Add any ideas to list

Divide class into 6 groups - Each group is given a group of first ladies.  Students should come up with a list of attributes/characteristics/symbols for the group as a whole.

Small groups should then meet together and complete a Venn Diagram to show similarities and differences of the groups to distinguish how portraits may/may not have changed through time.  Does this portray how the role of the first lady has evolved over time?

Further questioning:  What roles will future first ladies (men, husband, partner) play in the U.S.

Extension activity:  Portrait - Create a portrait of someone of importance or even a self-portrait.  What style will it be in?  How will you use the elements of portrayal?


This collection was created in conjunction with the National Portrait Gallery's 2019 Learning to Look Summer Teacher Institute.

#NPGteach

Tammy Fitts
14
 

Connecting to Great Gatsby's Appearance vs. Reality in Self Portraiture

This lesson, integrated halfway through F. Scott Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby, will address both character analysis and the ever present theme of appearance vs. reality in the text.  By using Thomas Hart Benton's "Self Portrait with Rita" as a starting point students will study the specifics of a self portrait from the 1920s which highlights American dream centered ideals.  As a second step, students will make connections between the painting and the characters from our text.  As a final extension activity, students will further explore the inspiration, the biography, or another work by Benton.

#NPGteach

Leslie Reinhart
15
 

Metadata and Tagging Activity

This activity, designed as a group exercise, asks participants to assume the role of a college student researching American women's work in the early 20th century, as an entry point to consider what is useful when tagging, searching, and creating digital resources. The collection includes the images that participants considered, followed in each case by a PDF of their responses. For the activity instructions, see the second tile of the collection.

This activity was conducted at the inaugural meeting of the Smithsonian Digital Resources Steering Committee, a group convened to share knowledge and explore best practices, issues, and strategies that arise in using and creating digital cultural museum resources.  

Kayo Denda, Librarian for Women's, Gender and Sexuality Studies at Rutgers University and Visiting Fellow at the Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access, created the activity reproduced here.  As a Fellow, Ms. Denda is exploring how libraries, museums, and archives develop metadata for content on women in American history.  


#DCRSC



Philippa Rappoport
17
 

Slow Looking: Untitled, by El Anatsui

In this collection, students will explore an artwork by El Anatsui, a contemporary artist whose recent work addresses global ideas about the environment, consumerism, and the social history and memory of the "stuff" of our lives. After looking closely and exploring the artwork using an adapted version of Project Zero's "Parts, Purposes, and Complexities" routine, students will create a "diamante" poem using their observations of the artwork and knowledge they gained about El Anatsui's artistic influences. Additional resources about El Anatsui, how to look at African Art, and Project Zero Thinking Routines are located at the end of the collection.

This collection was created for the "Smithsonian Learning Lab, Focus on Global Arts and Humanities" session at the 2019 New Jersey Principals and Supervisors Association (NJPSA) Arts Integration Leadership Institute. 

Keywords: nigeria, african art, textile, poetry, creative writing, analysis

Tess Porter
20
 

I'm taking my ball and going HOME!

This collection will serve as the basis for a series of activities designed to promote global competence and to teach for understanding . Specifically, these activities focus on building competence in the domains of investigating the world and taking action. All of these experiences and tasks will use the concept of "HOME" as their point of nucleation or seed, and as a through-line to connect the students to the material and help them extend the material beyond the classroom. 

Resources in this learning lab include:

  1. A collection of global thinking routines to be applied during these encounters, as well as the rationales and goals for their use. 
  2. An example of thinking routines designed to foster global competence based on Homer's Odyssey (I use the Fagles translation) and the work of contemporary Korean-born artist, Do Ho Suh. 
  3. Suggestions for expansion, further interrogation, and fractal extension, including extension into further abstraction.
  4. A series of journal entries charting some of the thinking leading to the production of this learning lab. 
  5. A padlet including documentation of my thinking process and some photos of other pieces by Do Ho Suh: https://padlet.com/debic_mathieu/67572xigbcn 


Timeline:

  • This learning lab collection was originally conceived to be used in an English/Language Arts or composition class. As such, it favors written expression. These writing assignments could be altered, shortened, or dispensed with altogether. 
  • The timeline I had in mind when building this learning lab was about two or three weeks of class time. Obviously it could go longer or shorter, depending on the circumstances of teachers using it. 

#SAAMteach

Mathieu Debic
9
 

When Marian Sang: Using Portraiture for Pre-reading and Post-reading Activities

In this collection, portraits are used for both pre-reading and post-reading activities in connection with reading a biography of Marian Anderson. The pre-reading activity uses Betsy Graves Reyneau's oil on canvas portrait, Marian Anderson, to begin to reveal Anderson to students. Post-reading activities include the use of photographs, video and William H. Johnson's oil on paperboard Marian Anderson to enhance understanding of Anderson's 1939 concert and to informally access student learning.  

When Marian Sang: The True Recital of Marian Anderson: The Voice of a Century is a picture book written by Pam Munoz Ryan and illustrated by Brian Selznick. This biography shares the story of opera star Marian Anderson's historic concert of 1939 on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial to an integrated crowd of over 75,000 people. The book recounts Marian's life as a she trains to become an opera singer and as she struggles with the obstacles she faces in pre-Civil Rights America. This picture book is an excellent choice to use in the upper elementary classroom in the context of a unit that focuses on "challenges and obstacles."

This collection was created in conjunction with the National Portrait Gallery's 2019 Learning to Look Summer Teacher Institute. 

#NPGteach

Katie Oxnard
8
577-600 of 807 Collections