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Found 6,394 Collections

 

American Weapons During the Revolutionary Era

The Revolution in the 1700's brought innovations to the American colonies. Because of this, America was able to endure hardships and adapted to resist the British by taking their technologies, along with a variety of French and Native American technologies, and refurbishing them to fit the American ideal.  America had become immensely dependent on the British throughout the 18th century, that it was a struggle for the people of America to strive for independence, as gathering natural resources was a challenge and learning to craft their own supplies was an additional skill the people were required to learn; as before, the British would simply import their goods into America for people to purchase. Another major resource that America lacked was experienced soldiers. The vast majority of Americans fighting in the Revolutionary War were simple townspeople who were drafted or volunteered, meaning that the army's skills would not be as polished as the British and would be required to figure out clever ways to win battles with tactics such as guerrilla warfare. They used the fact that the soldiers were extraordinarily unorganized they could successfully confuse the proper, formulated British armies to be victorious. Tactics such as these, combine with pure American craftsmanship was what brought America to its freedom and shaped the America we witness today.

Katherine Holcombe
10
 

American Transcendentalism

Transcendentalism is a philosophy that is rooted in the belief that man is inherently good but has been corrupted by society. Self reliance, self improvement, and peaceful protest were some methods practiced to reverse this effect. 

Linked in this collection are examples of the movement's influence in society, writings, and art.

Katie ODell
10
 

American Transcendentalism

This collection contains artwork, photography, and more that are indicative of the American movement of Transcendentalism.

Jacob Carlson
11
 

American stereotype: All Black Pilgrim Attire

Every year near Thanksgiving, images of our Pilgrims father begin to proliferate showing them as very austere and wearing only black clothing. This learning lab introduces images of Pilgrims that are compared with written primary sources. It was customary in the 17th century to inventory all the belongings of the deceased before they were distributed to the heirs. These inventories and the wills themselves provide detailed information about the attire of everyday Pilgrims of this period.

Arthur Glaser
21
 

American Schoolhouses

Andrea Ahlert Scroggy
42
 

american revolutionary war coin

project
Matthew Muldowney
10
 

american revolutionary war

revolutionary war

dakota redich
4
 

American Revolution: Western & Southern Campaign

This Smithsonian Learning Lab Collection coincides with the EFMS: The War Moves South website. Students will navigate the website and investigate the following topics:

  • US Navy & Privateers
  • The gunboat Philadelphia
  • Native Americans & the American Revolution
  • Southern Campaign
  • Aid from Spain
Students will utilize this Smithsonian Learning Lab Collection to complete a blog question on the aforementioned website.
Steven Hartnett
7
 

American Revolution, Investigation 2, Retellings of History

This collection is intended to follow a study of the major events of the American Revolution. Students will examine different artistic interpretations of the American Revolution in order to consider how events are portrayed differently based on the author's perspective. In this study the following goals are targeted: 

Big Ideas: 

  • We must be alert, questioning, and thoughtful readers of history. 
  • All retelling of history is an interpretation. 
  • Historical context is critical for understanding artifacts and historical interpretations. 
  • History is multifaceted and can be understood differently from multiple perspectives. 
  • Historical events are connected to current events.

Expert Thinking: 

  • Analyze primary and secondary sources for relevant historical details.
  • Synthesize details to understand the story of America’s founding.
  • Explain and analyze cause and effect relationships across historical events. 
  • Interpret history using a variety of sources and understanding of perspectives, including: personal stories, events, and factual knowledge.

Guiding Questions: 

  • What criteria should be used to evaluate a historical interpretation? 
  • Why is a single source insufficient for understanding a period of history?

Standards: 

  • SSA.3. Students explain how the present is connected to the past, identifying both similarities and differences between the two, and how some things change over time and some things stay the same. 
  • SSA.5. Students distinguish cause from effect and identify and interpret the multiple causes and effects of historical events
  • CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.5.5 Compare and contrast the overall structure (e.g., chronology, comparison, cause/effect, problem/solution) of events, ideas, concepts, or information in two or more texts.
  • CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.5.6 Analyze multiple accounts of the same event or topic, noting important similarities and differences in the point of view they represent.
  • CCSS.ELA.LITERACY.RL.5.4 Interpret words and phrases as they are used in a text, including determining technical, connotative, and figurative meanings, and analyze how specific word choices shape meaning or tone.

#LearnwithTR

Kathryn Mancino
9
 

American Revolution, Investigation 1, Events of the Revolution

This collection is intended to accompany a study of the major events of the American Revolution. In this study the following goals are targeted: 

Big Ideas: 

  • We must be alert, questioning, and thoughtful readers of history. 
  • All retelling of history is an interpretation. 
  • Historical context is critical for understanding artifacts and historical interpretations. 
  • History is multifaceted and can be understood differently from multiple perspectives. 
  • Historical events are connected to current events.

Expert Thinking: 

  • Analyze primary and secondary sources for relevant historical details.
  • Synthesize details to understand the story of America’s founding.
  • Explain and analyze cause and effect relationships across historical events. 
  • Interpret history using a variety of sources and understanding of perspectives, including: personal stories, events, and factual knowledge.

Guiding Questions: 

  • What forces affect historical change? (i.e. people, events, and ideas)
  • What are the important historical facts in the American Revolution? 
  • What events led to the American Revolution?

Standards: 

Section 1:  Colonial America and the French and Indian War

  • 4.7.1. Locate and identify the first 13 colonies and explain how their location and natural environment influenced their development. 
  • 4.7.10. Explain how the British colonial period created the basis for the development of political self-government and a free-market economic system. 
  • 4.8.2 Explain how political, religious, and economic ideas and interests brought about the Revolution. 

Section 2: Conflicting Interests 

  • 4.8.2 Explain how political, religious, and economic ideas and interests brought about the Revolution (e.g., resistance to imperial policy, the Stamp Act, the Townshend Acts, taxes on tea, and Coercive Acts). 
  • 4.8.3. Describe the significance of the First and Second Continental Congresses and of the Committees of Correspondence.

Section 3: Declaring Independence 

  • 4.8.4. Identify the people and events associated with the drafting and signing of the Declaration of Independence and the document’s significance, including the key political concepts it embodies, the origins of those concepts, and its role in severing ties with Great Britain. 
  • 4.9.6. Explain how the ideals set forth in the Declaration of Independence changed the way people viewed slavery.

Section 4: The Revolution, Briefly 

  • 4.9 Describe the course and consequences of the American Revolution. 
  • 4.9.1. Locate and identify the major military battles, campaigns, and turning points of the Revolutionary War. 
  •  4.9.2. Understand the roles of the American and British leaders, and the Indian leaders’ alliances on both sides. 
  • 4.9.3. Understand the roles of African Americans, including their alliances on both sides (especially the case of Lord Dunmore’s Proclamation and its impact on the war).

Section 5: Building the New Nation 

  • 4.10. Students describe the people and events associated with the development of the U.S. Constitution. 
  • 4.10.1. Describe the significance of the new Constitution of 1787, including the struggles over its ratification and the reasons for the Bill of Rights.  
  • 4.10.2. Describe the direct and indirect (or enabling) statements of the conditions on slavery in the Constitution and their impact on the emerging U.S. nation-state. 
  • 4.10.3. Describe how the Constitution is designed to secure our liberty by both empowering and limiting central government. 
  • 4.10.4. Understand the meaning of the American creed that calls on citizens to safeguard the liberty of individual Americans within a unified nation, to respect the rule of law, and to preserve the Constitution.

Usage: 

These artifacts are intended to provide students with a consistent opportunity to examine historical artifacts in order to make observations and connections to events of the time period. it is suggested that students examine 1-2 items at a time on a regular basis in order to evaluate each item as a historical source using a See-Think-Wonder routine. 

#LearnwithTR



Kathryn Mancino
27
 

American Revolution Era

The following objects are important symbols of the American Revolutionary era. All these objects either lead up to the revolution, were used during the war, or were vital in the success of the war. The American Revolution marked the urgency for independence amongst the colonies from Great Britain. This call for Independence has brought us to where we are today. 

vasthy gonzalez
10
 

American Revolution

Lesson plan for 5th grade (90 minutes) for use with Mike Wilkins Preamble, Schoolhouse Rock video, etc. #SAAMteach

laurawest200
5
 

American Revolution

#TeachingInquiry

Sarah Rafalowitz
6
 

American revolution

A surge for independence against the British fought by militia men of the 13 colonies. The American revolution was a costly, but necessary war waged for religious, financial, and social freedoms. These people initially came to the United States for these same freedoms, and instead faced tyranny from the same leader, just overseas in this case. Their goals with this revolution were to finally rid themselves of tyrannical governments. As a result of the revolution, many wanted a government that would protect them, but wasn't powerful enough to impose any tyrannical laws or restrictions on people. This American Revolutionary war was the start to what would later become the America we know and love today: the world's most powerful nation. 

Noah Shiffman
10
 

American Revolution

The American Revolution marked the point in history when the colonist finally felt it was time to demolish the current government in the colonies since their existence was to only make money for England and they knew that there was more to them then that.

Omar Arreola
7
 

American Revolution

Library/Social Studies Curriculum Crosswalk Resources
Erin Kizziar
5
 

American Response to the Holocaust in the Media

With America's memory of the holocaust slowly fading away, now it is more important than ever to spread information about the holocaust. In the words of George Santayana "Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it." We must continue to teach the next generations of Americans about this horrific event so that nothing of its kind will ever happen again. This collection is centered around America's response to the holocaust. It has a focus around media and public opinion. Within this curated exhibit are photos and artifacts pertaining to this topic. 

Maggie Heuer
16
 

American Protest to the Vietnam Conflict

This collection addresses the protest from Americans concerning the Vietnam Conflict throughout the 60s and 70s
Tyler Hofer
6
 

American Nationalism

By: Natasha, Seve, Brianna, and Colleen

Natasha De Silva
19
 

American Melting Pot - American Corner Trieste

ESL Lesson Plan - Middle School
Denise Tecchio
12
 

American Life in the 1960s Megan Rapp

This small collection of artifacts is meant to represent the decade of the 1960s in America. Through this collection, key points and events of the decade are highlighted, along with the social aspects of the 60s. Through this collection, you will be able to see the main ideas and themes of the 1960s in America. The 1960s were a tumultuous time for many Americans as The U.S was involved in both the Vietnam War and the Cold War, the feminist movement gained momentum, African Americans began standing up for themselves and their rights causing the Civil Rights Movement, the sexual revolution took place, and there was much poverty throughout the country. 

Megan Rapp
10
 

American Landscape

Images of landscapes can tell you about how the artist views his or her nation in the moment. What does it value? What does it aspire to be? What are its strengths and limitations? 

Evaluate to what extent views of American Identity changed from 1800-1980.

Sarah Wiseman
8
5833-5856 of 6,394 Collections