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Found 6,303 Collections

 

Symbolism, Story, and Art: Achelous & Hercules

A teacher's guide to the painting Achelous and Hercules, by Thomas Hart Benton. This 1947 mural retells an Ancient Greek myth in the context of the American Midwest. Includes the painting, a pdf of the myth "Achelous and Hercules," a website, and video discussions by curators and educators. The website includes an interactive exploring areas of interest on the piece, as well as lesson and activity ideas for the classroom.

Tags: greece
Tess Porter
6
 

Civil War

Soldiers of the Civil War
Sophie Chase
1
 

What Makes You Say That?: Interpretation with Justification Routine with a Poster

This collection uses the Harvard Project Zero Visible Thinking routine, highlighting interpretation with justification. The strategy is paired with a poster from the Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum. Once you have examined the poster and answered the questions, view the original resource and the related blog post to check and see how your interpretation compares with the expert. How does viewing the poster with the museum label change your interpretation?

Suggestions for teachers regarding visual clues for this image are in the "Notes to Other Users" section.
Ashley Naranjo
3
 

Hurricane Katrina

Materials about Hurricane Katrina
Blythe Hinitz
20
 

SummerVision @ SAAM (2016)

Artworks and activities from the Smithsonian American Art Museum.
Elizabeth Dale-Deines
8
 

Civil Rights

Drew Hammill
4
 

Kites

Did you know that the first aeronautical object in the National Air and Space Museum collection is a kite acquired in 1876? Kites aren’t only fun objects to fly at the beach or on the National Mall, they have a long and important history. The Wright brothers tested their wing warping theory with a kite and kites have also been used during wartime. In this episode of STEM in 30 we’ll look at not only how kites fly but their importance to aviation history.
Kerri Lambert
19
 

Pittsburgh 1932

This is a collection of images and documents that give historical context for the poem "Pittsburgh 1932." The poem itself tracks a city's changing economic landscape during war years and the Great Depression.

Students can use this collection directly to explore the literature and history.
Kate Harris
25
 

Hamilton!

Have your students (or you) caught the Hamilton bug inspired by Lin-Manuel Miranda's musical? This collection is filled with resources and teaching ideas about the founding father. With his musical, Miranda has transformed teaching the Founding Fathers from distant and un-relatable to a relevant story of a hustling immigrant whose rise helps progress the American Revolution and set the new nation on track to become the economic powerhouse that it remains today.
Tammi Light
14
 

Surrender at Appomattox

This is a lesson designed around the portrait "The Room in the McLean House, at Appomattox Court House, in which General Lee Surrendered to General Grant," and is intended to be used when teaching about General Lee's surrender. #npgteach
Jamie Grace
7
 

What Makes You Say That?: Interpretation with Justification Routine with a Historical Photograph

This collection uses the Harvard Project Zero Visible Thinking routine, highlighting interpretation with justification. The strategy is paired with a photograph from the National Portrait Gallery. Once you have examined the photograph and answered the questions, view the original resource and the short video with a curator to check and see if your interpretation was correct. How does viewing the photograph with the museum label change your interpretation?

Suggestions for teachers regarding visual clues for this image are in the "Notes to Other Users" section.
Ashley Naranjo
3
 

The Ancient Greeks Live On

A collection of artifacts showing how the ancient Greeks have influenced the modern world, combining both ancient Greek artifacts and modern objects and images. In some cases, the collection is incomplete and more modern examples could be identified. This is noted with some text and questions. Teachers might review this presentation with students, challenging them to identify modern examples that connect with the ancient objects that they see. Teachers are encouraged to ask students to compare and contrast, noting how time has changed certain concepts or ideas (e.g. our democracy is far more inclusive than Greek democracy was, although we use a representative democracy, not a true democracy.) Finally, teachers might consider using this activity as a precursor to further research on a specific topic addressing how the ancient Greeks continue to influence the modern world. Useful after students have had some introduction to the history and culture of Greece.
Kate Harris
29
 

The Remains at Pompeii

This is a collection of teaching resources that could be used to support a lesson on Pompeii and Mt. Vesuvius as well as life in ancient Rome. Included are artworks picturing Pompeii, archaeological artifacts, and links to "street views" of the ruins as well as magazine articles on the topic.

Some questions to consider are:
-What can we learn about the life of ancient Romans from the ruins at Pompeii?
-What are the strengths and weaknesses of learning from archaeological ruins?
-Why have the ruins at Pompeii continued to fascinate people over time?
Kate Harris
12
 

Ancient Rome: Discover the Story

This collection includes objects and artifacts representing life in ancient Rome. Students are challenged to write a creative story or narrative based on the objects in the collection, illustrating Roman life. The last two resources in the collection are a worksheet that teachers may use to frame the assignment and a grading rubric for the assignment.
Kate Harris
12
 

Paired Portraits

This lesson uses The "see, think, wonder" looking strategies to help students compare portraits on a field trip to the National Portrait Gallery. The lesson includes pre-museum visit activities, museum activities, and a follow up where students will create their own portraits.

This lesson was created in 2016 as part of the "Learning to Look" Teacher Workshop at the National Portrait Gallery. #npgteach
Kristin Enck
7
 

Language

languages of the world
Prashant Chauhan
1
 

General Robert E. Lee's Surrender at Appomattox Courthouse

Students will observe and analyze the portrait "The Room in the McLean House, at Appomattox C.H., in which Gen. Lee surrendered to Gen. Grant" by Major & Knapp Lithography Co.
#npgteach
Jennifer McGough
6
 

Thomas Alva Edison

Teri fulton
18
 

Unusual Material Portraits

Portraits using different materials. #npgteach
Caitlin Johns
15
 

Cartoon Analysis: Political "Blondins" Crossing Salt River

This lesson is geared towards 8th grade United States history. It can be used to teach about primary sources as well as the 1860 election. #npgteach
Rachel Heller
5
 

Monologues and Dialogues for the (out)WIN!

Lesson 2 of a currently 2-part series in creating characters and ideas from a portrait.

Following the improvised character discussions, students should be assigned one portrait from the collection "Thank You for Teaching Me English." Students will be told just a bit about the piece, specifically that the person portrayed is speaking the word that they taught the artist. Students will also be told the word for each portrait.

Using the strategy of "Peeling Back the Layers," students will create a character and either a monologue or a short scene devised from the portrait they were given. Each monologue or scene should show the sitter teaching the artist the word linked to the portrait. Students will create the story that necessitated the need to learn this word, how the word was received, and the appropriate definition of the word based on the story they create.
Katie McCreary
15
 

Αλφαβητάρια

A collection of alphabet books to inspire students to create their own. Alphabet books can be created using any subject and completed with any grade. They can be completed individually (one student makes a page for each letter of the alphabet) or as a group or class (each student takes one letter). Here are some ideas for topics or use with your students:
Kindergarden-1st--Pick a letter, write a sentence using that letter and illustrate.
2nd-4th--The class takes a topic such as insects and each student takes a page, researches and illustrates it.
5th-12th--Students take a topic (biography, historical topic, memoir about themselves, book that they've read) and creates an alphabet book with each page telling the story or giving information about the subject.
Met Kous
13
 

Αρχαία παιχνίδια

My first collection of ancient games.
Ourania Doula
7
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