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Found 6,064 Collections

 

Women and Sports

What were the similarities and differences between old attire and nowaday, and how did the old attire setback women in these sports.?

Meghan Schmetzer
6
 

Women and Sports

How have American women impacted the world of sports?

Arina Dillinger
5
 

Women and sports

How did women have an impact on sports culture,the way we think about sports, and leave their place in history?

Abigail Wendel
5
 

Women and Sports

Essential Question :
How did the women at the forefront of the sporting frontier use sports as a career to help gain women acceptance?

Ryan Devoss
5
 

Women and sports in history

How did women have an impact on sports culture,the way we think about sports, and leave their place in history?

Jessica Rosenberry
6
 

Women and Television

In what ways did women influence and impact television?

Ivan Li
5
 

Women and the Fight for Women's Rights

How did women protest, fight, and gain equal rights in America?

Alexa Santucci
4
 

Women and the Fight for Women's Rights

How did women succeed in their fight for women's rights?

Isabella Mannino
5
 

Women and the Fight for Women's Rights

How did women accomplish change in society to gain their rights?

Brooke Carver
6
 

Women and the Olympics

How did women's success in the Olympics increase in the 1900s?

Julianna Paulin
5
 

Women and the White House

How did women leave an impression on the White House?

Piper Russell
5
 

Women and the White House (First Lady)

How did the First Ladies display posperity and set an example for the women of America during their time at the White House?

Giovanna Niccolai
4
 

Women and Their Literary Work in the Middle Ages

During the Middle Ages, the Church exerted the greatest influence over how women were perceived, women did not have the opportunity to raise as warriors or queens as in the Ancient Times. 

The two main alternatives for a medieval woman were to marry, or to 'take the veil' and become a nun. Almost all female orders required women to live behind the walls of a monastery or within an individual cell, living a life of contemplation, prayer and work. However, there were some women, who broke with the traditional roles assigned to them in several ways during a time when women had no legal rights and were considered a man's property.

Take Heloise for example, she scandalized the 12th century France by having an love affair with her tutor. The letters she exchanged with Abelard  are being read to this day, through them we follow their tragic and passionate love affair. Another women, Hildegard of Bingen is known for her writings and music, her music is still performed today, and her spiritual works are read as examples of a feminine interpretation of church and spiritual ideas. 

Marie de France, was considered the most revolutionary writer of her time, as it was not common practice for women to author any texts at all, and so was Christine de Pizan, who become the first women to support herself and her children through writing after her husband died and she was left alone.

I have also included a fictional character in this collection, Sheharazad, the narrator of The One Thousand and One Nights.  The female characters in the stories fight to make their own choices and live according to their beliefs about freedom, sexuality, and love, as the other women in this collection.













bbridgette
6
 

Women and War

How did women's suffrage affect women's representation in wars?

Marisa Captline
5
 

Women at the Forefront - Heian Japan

This module is designed to compliment a unit on Heian Japan or of feudalism in Japan in general. The goal of this collection is to purposely include the role of women within an evaluation of feudal Japanese society and history. The lesson plan highlights Japanese women in leading roles, with a focus on historical representations of women during Heian Japan; it also includes similar examples of female characters from the Kamakura and Edo period. The two main categories of the collection are warriors and noble women, with the inclusion of the writer Murasaki Shikibu and illustrations of The Tale of Genji. The idea is to study ‘women’ as its own historical component, and the group as actors exerting historical agency. 

Given that the purpose of this collection is to concentrate on the role of women, it includes artwork that was achieved after the Heian and Kamakura periods and that are representations of salient women from the feudal era. 


Lesson plan (3-4 hours) 

1. Teacher leads an introduction to the feudal system and its particularities in Japan. If the class is by topics, this discussion could easily stem from a general discussion of feudalism in Europe. In our particular case, we have already discussed feudalism in Europe earlier, and so the teachers highlight parallels between the two systems in order to activate the main keywords of the unit and review ideas of how the feudal economy worked. 

2. Students read a textbook chapter on feudal Japan and answer comprehension and analysis questions from the text. Key concepts are established following this reading such as: daimyo, samurai, land distribution, family clans, and feudal social pyramid, among others.  

See: 

Spielvogel, Jackson J. World History: Journey Across Time. New York: Glencoe/McGraw-Hill, 2008. Print.

3. In small groups, students analyze original documents from the feudal period. Documents from the book cited below include: the Bushido code, family letters, and excerpts of laws, among other primary sources. Each group of students is in charge of one particular document. Students should identify: main idea, intended audience, who wrote it, and how does this particular document help understand Japanese feudalism. These documents should also help activate many of the key concepts studied earlier. Once all tables have their findings, the class comes together to present and discuss all documents. 

See: 

Stearns, Peter N. World History in Documents. New York, USA: NYU Press, 2008. Print.

4. Use this collection to shine the light on women during the feudal period. Lead a "Step Inside" routine with the resource "Ohatsu avenging her mistress Onoe." 

Students may well have noticed the silence regarding women's role at this point in the unit. In my classes, for instance, students automatically assume that there are working women alongside male merchants and farmers, but they have doubts as to women occupying higher roles in society. This routine can clarify some doubts as to their presence among higher social ranks. 

5. Allow students to browse the collection, play one of the videos on female samurais or lead other Project Zero routines with the other paintings of female warriors and writers. Once the class is familiar with the resources in the collection, lead the visible thinking routine "People/Parts/Interactions" to reevaluate society as a whole. 

Discuss how their reading of the texts in Step 2 and Step 3 has changed based on this new information. How do they now imagine women in feudal society?

6. Close the unit with the visible thinking routine "Circle of viewpoints." In our class, we use the routine's questions as a prompt for a one-page essay. Students answer the questions of the routine as if they were a person living in feudal Japan; they can choose to write a journal entry or an essay in the third person. Students should use the resources in this collection and in the texts provided to describe the life of their chosen character. This exercise allows students to explore context, society, thoughts, limitations and daily life from the point of view of a historical actor.


Extension activity (1 hour) 

Instead of leading a written routine of "Circle of viewpoints" students can create postcards written from the point of view of their historical characters. Students also design the flip side of their postcards and the artwork should illustrate the environment or experiences of their historical character. 


Denise Rodriguez
18
 

Women Before 1865

This collection is about how women were viewed and how they presented themselves before the year of 1865. There are many indirect ways to show how women were looked at during this time. During this time, there were no electronics, so pictures of women were actually paintings. In majority of the paintings of women, they all posed the same way; Facing forwards, Straight peaceful faces, with their hands positioned in front of them. In many paintings women wore jewelry, which indirectly suggested a higher social class. A lot of paintings found during this time period were paintings of white women, black women were rarely painted, if painted at all. The reason being is that this was the period during slavery. Black women were not respected or thought of as people like how white women were. There were also paintings of women and children. Women were more family oriented, they were the one's to take care of the household while men worked to take care of their households, although, around 1865 is when women started to take a stance for what they believed in and women's rights. 

Women during this time were completely different from women of today; how they dressed, why they dressed the way they did, their body figures, and etc. How women dressed during this time period correlated mainly with their social class. Women of a higher social class wore more expensive jewelry, mainly pearls. They also wore higher heels, while lower class women wore shorter pump heels. Women during this time period were also smaller. They had smaller waists, smaller feet, and smaller body parts in general. 

All this information is important because it not only shows how much women have evolved from this time period, but also shows how some things remained the same. 

Destiny Boyd
12
 

Women During the Revolutionary War

The Revolutionary War commenced shorty after the British parliament put in place the "intolerable acts" which were a series of seven acts that the American colonist dubbed "intolerable" and the British as "coercive". The acts were put in place to essentially punish the colonist after their Boston Tea Party protest. The Revolutionary War would most likely not have been able to progress without the support of women concerning various aspects. 

The Revolutionary War was an interesting time for women, women served in a lot of conventional ways such as cooks, maids, and nurses; however, women also served in a lot of unconventional ways such as spies and even soldiers. Race was also a factor in when accounting for the roles that women played as well. The following items are a small symbolic representation of the many various contributions that women made during the Revolutionary War.

http://www.history.org/History...

http://score.rims.k12.ca.us/sc...

http://www.historycentral.com/...

https://allthingsliberty.com/2...

https://www.revolutionary-war....

Hanif Fudaeel
10
 

Women in 1950s America

A learning resource to help develop students' ability to analyze an image and form an argument. The images in this collection are different portrayals of women in the United States during the 1950s. As you look through them, have your students think about these three key questions:

-What is being shown in the image?

-How is the woman represented in the image? Use concrete details from the image.

-Does the image compare to modern representations of women? Why or why not?

The collection ends with a quiz that can either be used as assignment to gauge the students' ability to pull together their analysis into a conclusion or a class discussion.

Alexander Graves
7
 

Women in Art

This collection will explore the depiction of women in art throughout different periods of time. The collection begins with the prehistoric art and ends with contemporary art. #AHMC2019 

Tasia McCoy
23
 

Women in Baseball and the Post Office

Issues of gender inequality have had profound effects on all aspects of American society and its many institutions. In conjunction with the National Postal Museum’s upcoming exhibition Baseball: America’s Home Run, this collection will assist teachers in examining this issue with their students through two important institutions of the 20th Century: Major League Baseball and the United States Postal Service. The collection explores this essential question: How was the changing status of women in American society during the late 19th and early 20th centuries represented in professional baseball and the United States Postal Service? In small groups, students will discuss this underlying question through the variety of resources in this collection, examining the historical access women have had to these institutions, their divergent experiences compared to their male counterparts, and how women have historically been depicted on USPS stamps. Some supporting questions to scaffold inquiry can be found in the “Notes to Other Users” section.

#BecauseOfHerStory

National Postal Museum
31
 

Women in Baseball and the Post Office

This collection explores this essential question: How was the changing status of women in American society during the late 19th and early 20th century represented in professional baseball and the United States Postal Service. In small groups, students will discuss this underlying question through the variety of resources in this collection, examining the historical access women have had to these institutions, their divergent experiences compared to their male counterparts, and how women have historically been depicted on USPS stamps. Some supporting questions to scaffold inquiry can be found in the “Notes to Other Users” section.

Jessica Rosenberry
28
 

Women in Business

What is the difference with women in business's in the 1890's compared to the 1920's?

Marissa Deltondo
5
 

Women in Education

How did women use resources and use their voices to adcance in education?

Livia Bookwood
1
5833-5856 of 6,064 Collections