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Found 6,100 Collections

 

Who is Frances Mary Albrier?

This is a collection of items belonging to, or about, Frances M. Albrier. Although an important female leader and activist during the mid-20th century, many students may not have heard of Ms. Albrier. Encourage students to act as history detectives, exploring the collection to determine why this woman's belongings are in the collections of the Smithsonian.

Some questions to consider:

  • What are Albrier's main accomplishments? What types of occupations did she have?
  • Based on these, what values do you think were important to her?
  • How does Albrier's life reflect major changes for women during the 20th century? Changes for African-Americans?
  • What do these items tell us about challenges facing African-American women in the mid-century?
  • What remains unknown about Albrier based on this collection? Where else could you go to look for more information?
  • Look at an encyclopedia entry for Ms. Albrier. Are there any events mentioned not covered in this collection? What might be a good item to add in order to better show her life?


tags: activism, civil rights, union, labor, voter registration, 60s, world war II, shipyards, WW2, nursing, Red Cross, National Council of Negro Women, Nigeria, independence, peace, moral rearmament, #BecauseOfHerStory

Kate Harris
15
 

Who is to blame for WWI?

Who is to blame for WWI? Is it Gavrilo Princip, for assassinating the archduke? Surely that’s much too simple? We like to identify “good guys” and “bad guys,” but is there danger is that? The reparations laid on Germany in the Treaty of Versailles, most historians agree, contributed to WWII... Can any one person, group of people, country, truly take the blame for such a crisis? Should they? Who should have stopped it? #Teaching Inquiry

Melissa Kozlowski Ziobro
16
 

Who May Enter? Ellis Island and Angel Island Experiences

During this experience you will follow in the steps of immigrants whose immigration story took them to Angel Island and Ellis Island providing you a window into who came to the United States, why they came, the immigration process, their acceptance or denial as well as their legacy. You will find student instructions for each section on the arrow slide dividers. Click on each for instructions.  #APA2018

Throughout this experience consider the 3 Ys:

  1. Why might this snapshot of Angel Island & Ellis Island matter to me?
  2. Why might it matter to people around (family, friends, fellow students, community)
  3. What might it matter to the world?

---

Quotes / Poems to consider:

Angel Island Written on the walls in Chinese

I am distressed that we Chinese are
in this wooden building
It is actually racial barriers which cause
difficulties on Yingtai Island.
Even while they are tyrannical they still
claim to be humanitarian.
I should regret my taking the risks of
coming in the first place.

This is a message to those who live here not
to worry excessively.
Instead, you must cast your idle worries to
the flowing stream.
Experiencing a little ordeal is not hardship.
Napoleon was once a prisoner on an island.

Ellis Island

"Well, I came to America because I heard the streets were paved with gold. When I got here, I found out three things: first, the streets weren’t paved with gold; second, they weren’t paved at all; and third, I was expected to pave them." Italian Immigrant

"Island of Hope, Island of Tears"



Merri Weir
33
 

Who provoked the Korean War?

"On June 25, 1990, the North Korean Army launches it surprise assault on the South." But what led up to this moment? This activity asks students to read primary source documents and interpret historical events surrounding the Korean conflict. Students will look for motives and evidence in a variety of accounts and determine who was responsible for starting the Korean War.

There are resources with quiz questions that students can answer directly, or teachers may prefer to print documents and resources for in-class use. It is recommended that teachers preview the materials in this teaching collection as there are a variety of ways to structure the lesson.

Essential questions include:
-How would you describe the relationship between Kim Il Sung and Joseph Stalin?
-Was North Korea, a smaller country, pulling a superpower into a conflict?
-Was the Soviet Union using North Korea to further its goals?
-Why did the United States choose to respond via the United Nations forces instead of unilaterally? How did this decision impact the conflict?
-How does this incident reflect larger themes and issues of the Cold War, especially the role of the United Nations, over-arching foreign policy strategy, and nuclear fears?

Tags: Wilson Center, Cold War, Korea, China, Truman, Eisenhower, Macarthur, Soviet Union, USSR, Communism
Kate Harris
17
 

WHO TELLS YOUR STORY? EXPLORING WOMEN AND IDENTITY

Women’s identities are complex, intersecting with race, class, sexuality, etc., and have often been overlooked or erased from history. What is the importance of being able to express yourself and voice your story? 

This collection features resources related to the November 7, 2019, professional development webinar, "Who Tells Your Story? Exploring Women and Identity," hosted by educators from the Smithsonian American Art Museum and the National Portrait Gallery.  This joint webinar is one of three in the series A Woman’s Place Is in the Curriculum: Women’s History through American Art and Portraiture. Learn how American art and portraiture can bring diverse women’s stories into your classroom, connecting with themes you may already teach. Discover strategies for engaging your students in close looking and critical thinking across disciplines.  #SAAMTeach #NPGteach

This project received support from the Smithsonian American Women’s History Initiative. To learn more, visit the Smithsonian American Women History Initiative website. #BecauseOfHerStory


Anne Showalter
25
 

Who Was to Blame for World War 1

#teachinginquiry

Elizabeth Evans
6
 

Why are written laws so important? #TeachingInquiry

Hammurabi created the first set of written laws in Mesopotamia. Why was this a huge step for civilization?
Kim Counihan
21
 

Why did the Second Great Awakening inspire reform movements?

The Second Great Awakening was a religious revival movement in the first half of the 19th century. It emphasized emotion and enthusiasm, but also democracy: new religious denominations emerged that restructured churches to allow for more people involved in leadership, an emphasis on man's equality before god, and personal relationships with Christ (meaning less authority on the part of a minister or priest). There was also a belief that the Second Coming was imminent, and society must be improved before that time. Women were heavily involved in the 2nd Great Awakening movement, converting in large movements and taking on leadership roles in service committees and reform work.

Students and teachers might use this collection as a topical resource to explore: Why and how did the Second Great Awakening inspired a range of antebellum reform movements?

Other questions that might support this inquiry include:

  • How are concepts of democracy and equality important to both the Second Great Awakening and the rise of reform movements?
  • Why do you think women were often leaders in antebellum reform movements?
  • More Americans were moving westward during this period. How do you think that impacted the religious revival movement?
  • Can you hypothesize a connection between the increase in utopian societies during this time and the growing reform and religious movements?

Tags: abolition, temperance, women's rights, women's suffrage, second coming, antebellum reform, asylum and prison reform, education, 2GA

Kate Harris
35
 

Why is Art Important to Atta Hashmi

This is my collection.

Attaur Hashmi
4
 

Why is Art important?

Val Brodsky
4
 

Why Move West?

Each resource symbolizes a reason why Americans chose to move west.  For each one, complete the following activity:

1) Source it: Is it a primary or secondary source? Who made it? When was it made? What is the author's purpose (PIE)? Hint- click the i on the left side of the screen to learn more about the source.

2) Identify at least 4 details that you see in the image.

3) Why would this resource motivate people to move West? Use a specific detail that you saw to prove your point.

Michelle Moses
9
 

Why Move West?

Each resource symbolizes a reason why Americans chose to move west.  For EACH one, complete the following activity:

1) Source it: What is it? Who made it? When was it made? What is the author's purpose/why was it made? Hint- click the i on the left side of the screen to learn more about the source.

2) Identify at least 3 details that you see in EACH image.

3) Why would this resource motivate people to move West? Use a specific detail that you saw to prove your point.

Terri Duncan
12
 

Why some objects become cultural heritage and others don't?

This collection aims to discuss the reasons why some objects are elevated to the category of cultural heritage while others are not. Museums are important institutions in this process and the collection of a museum is by nature a collection of cultural heritages. From the survey of some objects safeguarded in the Smithsonian, we will reflect on the immaterial character of all cultural heritages. After all, the value of an asset does not lie only in its physical nature or in its function and market value.

Wellcome!



João Victor Camara
2
 

Wilbur and Orville Wright: The Process of Invention

Before they built airplanes, the Wright brothers built bicycles. This episode of STEM in 30 will be broadcast live from inside the Wright brothers' bicycle shop at Greenfield Village in Dearborn, Michigan. We'll take a look at their workshop and see how their fascination with solving the problem of human flight led to the invention of the airplane.

December 17, 2015

STEM in 30 at National Air and Space Museum
14
 

Wild Children

Katie Cahill
2
 

Will, Darius, Jonathon War DBQ

To what extent did economic, political, and social aspects of society change after the War of 1812? Focus on the time period of 1800-1825.

Will Colenbrander
8
 

Willi Smith

Willi Smith (1958-1987)

Willi Smith was an African American fashion designer whose street wear line known as WilliWear was and experiment of democracy in fashion. WilliWear designs were known to be bold, blurring the lines between high and low culture, and his work often involved collaborations with other artists and designers. The openly gay designer's career was cut short when he died in 1987 from complications from HIV/AIDS.

This collection is a representation of the 2020 exhibition Willi Smith: Street Couture at the Cooper Hewitt Design Museum, which features over 200 pieces from Smith’s work and career and his numerous collaborations with artists, dancers, choreographers, graphic designers, architects, and more. The works on view include video, sketches, patterns, photographs, and garments.

Cooper Hewitt Education Department
67
 

William Faulkner: Examining Portraiture

This teacher's guide provides portraits and analysis questions to enrich students' examination of William Faulkner, an American author and Nobel Prize laureate. Includes the video "Defining Portraiture: How are portraits both fact and fiction?" and the National Portrait Gallery's "Reading" Portraiture Guide for Educators, both of which provide suggestions and questions for analyzing portraiture.  

Consider:

  • What do these portraits have in common? How are they different?
  • How are these portraits both fact and fiction?
  • How do these portraits reflect how they wanted to be seen, or how others wanted them to be seen? Consider for what purpose these portraits were created (such as the caricature, stamp, etc.).
  • Having read one of his stories, does the portrait capture your image of William Faulkner? Why, or why not?
  • If you were creating your own portrait of William Faulkner, what characteristics would you emphasize, and why?

Keywords: mississippi, ms, the sound and the fury, writer

Tess Porter
6
 

William H. Johnson

Jean-Marie Galing
12
 

William Healey Dall

A sampling from the Smithsonian pan-institutional collections documenting the work of William Healey Dall.
Stephanie Norby
12
 

Wilma Rudolph

Wilma Rudolph defied the odds and paved the way for African American female athletes. Discover her strength and courage.

This collection was created in conjunction with the National Portrait Gallery’s 2017 Learning to Look Summer Teacher Institute.

 

TAGS: #NPGteach, portrait, learning to look, National Portrait Gallery


Jennifer Houston
6
 

Wind

Meredith Osborne
6
 

Wind

Smithsonian Early Enrichment Center
6
5809-5832 of 6,100 Collections