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Found 6,964 Collections

 

The Fight to End Apartheid

This is a topical collection of resources related to the fight to end apartheid. Teachers and students can use this collection to explore strategies used to fight against apartheid as well as famous leaders in the fight. Strategies include economic sanctions, boycotts, and divestment, raising awareness through artists and musicians, nonviolent protest, armed resistance, and external political pressures on the South African government. This is a work-in-progress based on the digitized materials within the Smithsonian Learning Lab's collection--it is not meant to be wholly definitive or authoritative. Think of it as a starting point for further inquiry!

Possible student activities include:

-researching one strategy of resistance and/or one well-known leader in depth.

-drawing comparisons between political organizations and movements like the ANC, PAC, Black Consciousness Movement, and United Democratic Front.

-creating a timeline of resistance to apartheid.

-debating the use of armed resistance and "sabotage."

-interviewing adults who may remember the end of apartheid.

-drawing comparisons between the civil rights movement in the United States and the anti-apartheid movement.

-choose 1-3 events and make a case for them as turning points in the fight against apartheid. What makes these events so significant?

tags: apartheid, South Africa, Mandela, Tutu, Huddleston, Soweto, townships, Sharpeville, Defiance Campaign, Biko

Kate Harris
28
 

The Five Pillars of Islam

This collection includes artifacts and images that represent the Five Pillars of Islam. Students should complete the chart (included as the final resource) by first explaining what each pillar is. Then, after looking through the collection, they should identify an artifact that represents each one and explain why.

Tags: Islam, Muslim, religion, Muhammad, object analysis, practice, pilgrimage, hajj, fasting, Ramadan, Shahadah, zakat, tithe, salat, prayer

Jeffrey Theil
16
 

The Five Pillars of Islam

This collection includes artifacts and images that represent the Five Pillars of Islam. Students should complete the chart (included as the final resource) by first explaining what each pillar is. Then, after looking through the collection, they should identify an artifact that represents each one and explain why.

Tags: Islam, Muslim, religion, Muhammad, object analysis, practice, pilgrimage, hajj, fasting, Ramadan, Shahadah, zakat, tithe, salat, prayer

Kate Harris
16
 

The Five Pillars of Islam

This collection includes artifacts and images that represent the Five Pillars of Islam. Students should complete the chart (included as the final resource) by first explaining what each pillar is by creating an image that represents the pillar. Then, after looking through the collection, they should identify an artifact that represents each one and explain why.

Tags: Islam, Muslim, religion, Muhammad, object analysis, practice, pilgrimage, hajj, fasting, Ramadan, Shahadah, zakat, tithe, salat, prayer

Kristen Olson
16
 

The Flu

Understanding the Pandemic

Colleen Stevens
0
 

The Flu

Understanding the Pandemic
Colleen Stevens
3
 

The Four Freedoms

The "Four Freedoms" speech, as the 1941 State of the Union address came to be known, were goals outlined by President Franklin Delano Roosevelt on January 6, 1941 to Congress and the American people. He proposed four fundamental freedoms that people everywhere in the world should enjoy and described the "unprecedented" threat that Nazi domination of Europe presented to the security of the United States. This Learning Lab collection includes four Norman Rockwell paintings, alongside a portrait of Franklin Delano Roosevelt and a stamp with this iconic phrase. An audio excerpt of the speech is available via the National Archives and included here.
Glenn Wiebe
9
 

The Four Freedoms

The "Four Freedoms" speech, as the 1941 State of the Union address came to be known, were goals outlined by President Franklin Delano Roosevelt on January 6, 1941 to Congress and the American people. He proposed four fundamental freedoms that people everywhere in the world should enjoy and described the "unprecedented" threat that Nazi domination of Europe presented to the security of the United States. This Learning Lab collection includes four Norman Rockwell paintings, alongside a portrait of Franklin Delano Roosevelt and a stamp with this iconic phrase. An audio excerpt of the speech is available via the National Archives and included here.
Ashley Naranjo
11
 

The Framers of the Constitution

The people included in this collection are influential members of a prestigious group of members known as the "Framers" today. The Framers are known for designing the government we use to this day, and the majority of the group even signed the  document. This event took place at the Constitutional Convention in Pennsylvania at May 25 to Sept 25 of 1787. The designed document is known as the "The U.S. Constitution." "Around 55 members were included in this group, but only 39 members actually singed the Constitution or various reasons" (U.S. Archives Administration).

If one needs to know how United States came to be this great country, this world- power, they have to look down to its roots, and its roots come from the American Revolution, and the Constitutional ConventionPeople learn of the members, the very influential, and powerful members involved in designing this great world- power status of a country. One can understand, through this collection/ demonstration, the start of the roots of the modern United States of America. As an American, people should learn of their history, and should also know why their  society act as it does, because it always falls onto the government, which currently is the US Constitution.

Pavan Namani
10
 

The French Revolution: An Examination into its Causes

Examine these sources to help you answer the essential question: How did conditions in France lead to the revolution of 1789?
Molly Long
3
 

The Garden in Your Beer

On August 16th, Smithsonian Associates will a guided tasting with Doug Campbell, president of Brewery Ommegang. Hear about the innovative brewing practices of American craft brewers who interpret centuries-old traditions with a contemporary twist. Take a look at the garden through the lens of the botanicals, spices, wild yeasts, fruits, berries, and hops that flavor your favorite beer. Enjoy light food pairings with the beer samples. For more information and to purchase tickets, visit smithsonianassociates.org

Margaret O'Meara
51
 

The Gestapo

The Gestapo, also known as the SS, were Hitler's secret police force he was used to grow in power in Germany. The SS were formed as a security detail but then were sent to capture Jews and deport them to the numerous concentration camps across Europe to exterminate them. Hitler's enemies and political rivals were beaten and scared into submission by the Gestapo to further extend the Nazis Party's strength. They became a private army that served Hitler in carrying out his goals and were a massive instrument of his consolidation of power in Germany. The series of picture below represent key moments in the growth of the Nazis Party and the actions of the SS under Hitler's control. The brutality of the Holocaust was mainly caused by the Gestapo, who carried out mass executions and mistreatment of the Jewish people. Historians and people looking back at the Holocaust have to understand the terrible actions of the SS so that nothing like it will happen ever again.

Calvin Liang
4
 

The Gilded Age/ Transition into Modernism

Lesson Activity/Directions: 

This collection is used, through a See/Think/Wonder format, to launch a discussion about the "Gilded Age" and how the lifestyles, values, belief systems, and socioeconomic circumstances surrounding this era helped prompt the Modernism movement. Discussions revolve around the economic disparities, and some polarizing movements such as Prohibition. Therefore, in a sense, this collection helps launch the Modernism/Great Gatsby Unit.

Students are divided into small groups - usually  no more than 3 per group. Each are provided with one painting. During some lessons, I've printed out the pictures for them, but other times I've also provided them with a link and one student pulls up the painting on their computer - for the group; in this manner, they zoom in and really investigate the details. This works well for a small class. By this point in the school year, we've completed the "See - Think - Wonder" activity enough so that it is familiar. Groups go through this process on their own, and then their art work is on the smart board, and they walk the class through their discoveries, interpretations, and questions. Jointly as a class, we speculate about what this image might reveal to us about the time period, it's people, values, etc. How might we see this play out in literature?  Eventually I weave in a number of the facts provided below in "Notes to other users." 

I conclude with this statement by John D. Rockefeller on the smart board - - it seems to preview some of "The Great Gatsby" themes quite well. 

"I believe it is my duty to make money and still more money and to use the money I make for the good of my fellow man according to the dictates of my conscience." - - John D. Rockefeller, 1905

#SAAMteach

(For background/historical context notes, see below within "Notes to Other Users."


Annette Spahr
12
 

The Global Collection #TeachingInquiry

A collection focused on teaching about the power of diverse communities to Grades 3 and up. The artifacts found in this collection are intended to focus on the concept of cultural and artistic traditions by developing an understanding of diverse communities through the compelling question, “How does Culture make us similar or different?” Also, to help students build contextual knowledge under the supporting questions of (1) what is Culture, (2) how does Culture change over time, and (3) what can we learn about a Culture through their artistic traditions? #C3Framework #TeachingInquiry

lindi Ingram
14
 

The Global Implications of HIV/AIDS

This activity can be used on its own or as a starting point for an interdisciplinary exploration of the global implications of HIV/AIDS.

This collection includes a three-part activity that can be modified by choosing to spend more or less time considering other viewpoints on HIV/AIDS. It uses Project Zero Thinking Routines and several images that allow students to explore multiple perspectives on HIV/AIDS. I have also created a separate collection with more images that could be used as starting points for further conversation called “The Global Implications of HIV/AIDS - An Interdisciplinary Exploration.” 

The focus of this particular collection is to allow students to begin exploring at the individual level and then keep zooming out to the global level to engage with HIV/AIDS as a global issue.

Part I: The individual and Individuals within a Society

Using a work by Felix Gonzalez-Torres and the Project Zero Thinking Routine “See, Think, Wonder,” students can begin the conversation about the toll of HIV/AIDS on the individual level. Depending on student comments, this could also involve individuals within a society.  The video included here could be shown as a follow-up explanation or could simply be used to help the teacher and not shown to students. The images of the quilt panel and the poster could both be used with the Project Zero Thinking Routine “Circle of Viewpoints” to help further the society or systems approach. These images allow students to explore the political complexities and how this can directly impact individuals within a group. Again, the video included could be used to enhance teacher and/or student knowledge.

 

Part II: Engaging in conversations about Society and Global Issues

Students will use the Project Zero Thinking Routine “See, Think, Wonder” to explore the Gapminder HIV Chart graphic (axes have been removed). If the group of students you are working with have less experience with thinking routines in general or are less inclined to take risks in sharing out, skip to the original version of the Gapminder HIV Chart graphic instead. At either starting point, more information can be revealed as students pose thoughts and wonders about the data provided. The link to the TedTalk can help students better understand what the graph is showing and perhaps be another starting point for a dialogue on the complexities of HIV/AIDS.

 

Part III: Reflection

There is some reflection built into the “Circle of Viewpoints” Thinking Routine but it is worthwhile to also reflect at the end of the activity. I have provided the Project Zero “I used to think…But now I think” Thinking Routine slide but a teacher could also choose to return to the Wrap Up questions provided from the earlier “Circle of Viewpoints” Thinking Routine and revisit what the students had mentioned from Part II. 

Emily Veres
13
 

The Global Implications of HIV/AIDS - An Interdisciplinary Exploration

This collection includes several images that could be used as starting points for students to engage in a dialogue about the complexities of HIV/AIDS. I would very much encourage students to be given choice when exploring a topic from an interdisciplinary approach, but often it can be helpful to provide a starting point.  Works of art can be used, as there are opportunities for students to engage in conversations in pairs or small/large groups about multifaceted issues such as this.  A painting or photograph can provide a low-risk way of beginning a discussion about challenging topics. 

Students should feel free to use other areas of knowledge beyond what I have included such as Geography and History or more detailed topics such as stigma or virology.  Data from the local Department of Health could also be used in addition to or in place of the Gapminder HIV Chart. To see a sample exploration that could be used in place of a much larger interdisciplinary exploration, please see the collection titled "The Global Implications of HIV/AIDS."

Emily Veres
18
 

The Golden Years

Space songs by Elton John and David Bowie #ISTE2016
Kyle-Pierre Nfr, NIT
2
 

THE GREAT CHANGE OF AMERICA: THE REVOLUTIONARY WAR

Starting in 1650, Great Britain began to control and limit the settlers in America by constraining them to cling to the Navigation Acts. In the vicinity of 1650 and 1776, numerous more confinements were put on the pilgrims and they at long last joined together and defied their nation of origin. Both physical and verbal strikes from America were coordinated towards the British. Parliamentary tax collection, confinement of common freedoms, and the inheritance of pilgrim political thoughts all assumed an equivalent part in the prompting of the American Revolution. 

My collection will represent the events and materials, that has ignited the Revolutionary War to the Declaration of Independence from the European/British.

Syed Ahmed
12
 

The Great Debate: Portraiture and Primary Sources

This collection is created in conjunction with a professional development workshop facilitated by the National Portrait Gallery and Teaching with Primary Sources Northern Virginia (TPSNVA is funded by a grant from the Library of Congress). 

Have you ever wondered if a portrait is a primary source? In this workshop, we will examine portraits from the Portrait Gallery, along with primary sources from the Library of Congress, to consider this question and explore connections between the two distinct collections. Participants will brainstorm and come up with strategies to incorporate these rich resources into their English and social studies curriculum.  

#NPGteach

Briana White
66
 

The Great Depression

Christina Ratatori
15
 

The great depression

Mabi Aleman
2
 

The Great Depression

Ben Kane
17
 

The Great Depression Ichile

Iyelli Ichile
1
 

The Great Gatsby

Rachel Tran
7
5761-5784 of 6,964 Collections