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Found 6,884 Collections

 

Discrimination of African American Hair

The purpose of this collection is to talk about the discrimination of African American hair. I will be explaining types of discrimination and how it has effected some people while in their work place, school and in their daily life. I also mention how some states have made laws to protect our people from these situations. 

kayla moore
5
 

People, Place, & Time: American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages 2019

This collection serves as a companion to the presentation People, Place, and Time: How Art Reflects Culture - Smithsonian Collections given at the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL) 2019 Annual Convention and World Languages Expo on November 23, 2019.  Targeted to language educators, this presentation explores how museum resources, Global Thinking Routines, and the Sustainable Development Goals can help students understand how art reflects culture, increase their language proficiency, and develop global competence and 21st century skills.  The presentation shares three case-study collections designed for the Spanish-language classroom: Night of the Dead by Alan CraneCaja De Memoria Viva II: Constancia Colón de  Clemente by Adrián Román, and Méndez v. Westminster 1947 

This collection includes presentation slides, links to the three case-study collections, museum resources, Project Zero thinking routines, examples of student work, and more. 

Presenters: Marcela Velikovsky (Bullis School), Tess Porter (Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access), and Vicky Masson (Norwood School).

#Arago #Rafael Lopez #Spanish / English #Mexican-American #California #Latino Civil Rights #Empathy #Desegregation #Critical thinking #Curiosity #Stamps #LatinoHAC 

Vicky Masson
38
 

H.G. Wells Time Machine- The symbolism of Machines

Machines are an important symbol in The Time Machine. The information in my collection is made up of 4 machines/modern technology of the past, and 4 machines/technology of the future. The information on the future is mostly about transportation, for example, future cars, planes, and travel in space. The information on artifacts of the past is about machines that were considered modern in new when they were invented. The Machines in the novel are in the Palace of Green Porcelain and they are falling apart, rusting, and old. It is hard to tell from what time periods they came from because the time traveler went so far into the future. The Machines in the museum could still be form far in the future from our point in time but in the past from where the time traveler is. They may also be from the past from our point in time. In the Time Machine, machines represent the hope the time traveler has that he might be able to go back in time. 

Caroline Fredey
11
 

H.G. Wells: The Time Machine

The White Sphinx both physically and psychologically plays an important role in the novel and the early 1900s.

Aashi Goel
9
 

H.G. Wells: The Time Machine

Just like the lever in the novel Time Machine by H.G. Wells, these objects mean more than just simple tools.

Ivy Kang
8
 

H.G. Wells The Time Traveler : Weapons

Weapons by Sean Gogolin

Sean Gogolin
8
 

Time Machine By H.G Wells: Age of Industrialization

This collection represents the age of industrialization in the eighteenth century.


William Chan
23
 

Who "Cares?"

What does a comparison of the collections of Smithsonian's  Museum of American History, Division of Science and Medicine   (Washington, D.C.) 

and its local affiliate the Western Reserve Historical Society (Cleveland, Ohio) 

tell us about Collecting and the recognition of women in medicine and Science?

Kimberly Lenahan
23
 

Cultural Communications: Telling Our Stories

Language is the very first tool that we use to understand the ideas that we are trying to share. But what about the monuments, art, and songs that we have created to share our ideas with one another? This exploration will focus on how American culture founded on the mixing of ethnicities and experiences used the skills and talents of its members to reveal its faults and celebrate its wonder and imagination. This collection focuses on the identities and expressions of 1st Nations People, African American, and White American cultures. There are so many other cultures that have contributed to this nations story, this is just one exploration of many that we should embark on to tell our stories of who we are as a people and a nation. This exploration will give students a way to examine the history of those around them, but also their place within this most extravagant quilt of this country. 

  • The purpose of this activity is to give students a better understanding of the American Indian identity of the United States as foundational to understanding this land. From that foundation they will journey through the musical/dance expressions of those who came to be known as White Americans and African Americans, who came to inhabit the US and through them some of the historical/contemporary realities and perspectives that make up a part of our society.

Please follow the lesson plan laid out at the beginning of the collection to see the best way to use it. #goglobal

Sean Felix
73
 

U.S. History: Code Talkers

The following collection contains a possible lesson plan with ideas on how to use the resources.  The collection consists of information that identifies the bravery and contributions of Native American Code Talkers.  

#EthnicStudies

Rick Bleemel
12
 

H. G. Wells Time Machine

Jessica Brassie
4
 

What does it mean to be human in the Anthropocene?

This collection was designed to serve as a bridge between the high school biology units of evolution and ecology as students explore the evolution of humanity through both a biological and moral lens.  Students will use Project Zero Thinking Routines to examine various artifacts from the Smithsonian Museum of Natural History as they grapple with answering the overarching question: What does it mean to be human in the Anthropocene?  #GoGlobal

What does it mean to be human in the Anthropocene? : Students answer/revise their initial answers to the overarching question after gaining additional knowledge from various learning activities: 

  • Claim/Support/Question:  Students use the Claim/Support/Question thinking routine to frame their thinking around and grapple with this question.
  • Skull Analysis > Human Evolution Misconceptions: After the discussion on human evolution misconceptions, students can revise their thoughts on "what it means to be human" and begin to develop a class list on the characteristics shared by humans.
  • Constructing an Ancestral Timeline: After constructing their timeline, students will have gained additional an understanding of specific morphological and behavioral characteristics of humans. 

Using this Collection: 

  • Detailed suggestions on how to implement the learning activities are found in the "information" section of each of the Blue Activity Tiles as well as the Project Zero Thinking Routine Tiles.
  • Notes regarding the use of each Project Zero Thinking Routine are documented as annotations within each individual Thinking Routine tile and provide specific instructions on how align these routines with this collection.  

Global Competence Connection:

  • Students will be challenged to “investigate the world” both in a modern and prehistoric sense as they explore this the resources in this collection.
  • One goal of this collection is to inspire students to take action as a result of considering the impacts that modern humans have had on the planet. 

Additional Questions Explored through this Collection:

  • What (specific behaviors, adaptations, etc.) allow species to survive?
    • This question can be highlighted during the skull sorting and analysis activities in order to help students review the concepts of adaptation, evolution by natural selection, etc. 
      • Extension: Teachers can project photos of these species in their natural environments and ask students to identify the adaptations that aid them in survival. This exploration can be used to explore full-body morphological differences between humans and non-humans.    
    • This question can also be explored as students analyze the Human Evolution Timeline Interactive. Teachers can ask students to compare and contrast the adaptations of various hominid species and propose ways in which these adaptations aided species to survive in their various environments. 
  • How have climatic changes impacted the survival of species over time?
    • This question can be presented as students explore the Interactive Human Evolution Timeline. The timeline presents data showing how the Earth's climate has fluctuated over the 8 million years of human evolution and highlights the fact that some of the most important milestones in human evolution occurred during the greatest climatic fluctuations. 
    • Teachers can use this exploration to foreshadow upcoming discussions of modern climate change.
  • How fragile is human life?
    • The Human Family Tree and Human Evolution Timeline interactives allow for thoughtful exploration of this question as they provide visualizations of hominid existence, individual species' lifespans in geologic time, and extinctions. 
    • Teachers can highlight the small amount of time that modern humans have existed in comparison to early humans as well as points in history that modern humans were faced with events that nearly caused extinction and ask students to grapple with the fragility of human life.  
  • Why do we matter as humans in the anthropocene?
    • This question serves as the bridge into the study of ecology and human impacts on the environment and challenges students to deeply consider their importance to their world. 


Aleah Myers
32
 

American Indian Culture and Rights

#ethnicstudies

Meridith Manis
9
 

Investigating the Layers of a Korean Buddhist Sculpture

This Learning Lab Collection focuses on a single Buddhist object from the National Museum of Korea.  Students will formulate questions about this work of art using Project Zero's Layers Visible Thinking Routine.  They will investigate answers to their questions by researching the exhibition website and engaging with videos, virtual tours, and other digital resources provided.  

#AsiaTeachers
Tags:  Art; Buddhism; Korea; Project Zero; research; National Museum of Korea


About the exhibition:

Sacred Dedication:  A Korean Buddhist Masterpiece
September 21, 2019–March 22, 2020
Arthur M. Sackler Gallery

A single object—a beautiful gilt wood sculpture of Gwaneum, the bodhisattva of compassion and the most popular deity in Korean Buddhism—is the focus of this loan exhibition from the National Museum of Korea. Carved in the late Goryeo period (918–1392), this crowned image is now known to be the oldest surviving gilded wood figure in an informal pose. Its posture, with one leg raised and the other lowered, is associated with the deity’s dwelling place, where he sits calmly on rocks above the crashing waves of the sea. The same subject in a similar pose was common in devotional paintings, such as the hanging scroll of Suwol Gwaneum bosal (Water-Moon Avalokiteshvara) now in the collection of the Freer Gallery.

Sacred texts and potent symbolic objects were sealed inside this hollow religious sculpture when it was first placed into worship in the thirteenth century. The practice of adding dedication material to a Buddhist sculpture during consecration ceremonies was believed to transform it into a living body. Recent research conducted by the National Museum of Korea provides new information about this rare sculpture, its hidden contents, and the special rituals that surrounded image consecration in Korea centuries ago.

We thank our colleagues at the National Museum of Korea for sharing their research and facilitating this exhibition.

Freer and Sackler Galleries
12
 

PBA Example Project: HG Wells's Time Machine and Shelley's Frankenstein

This is an example collection for a project on Time Travel.   For this collection, I'm using artifacts from Mary Shelley's Frankenstein, so that I do not inspire my students to borrow my content.  I want them to see this collection as an inspiration, not as a direct analogue. 

Eric Lister
9
 

Not So Still Life

#ethnicstudies #UShistory

Malin Lindelow
6
 

Using Authentic Resources: American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages 2019

This collection gathers resources to help language students understand how art reflects culture, increase their language proficiency, and develop global competence and 21st century skills.  This collection includes artwork relevant to exploring and learning about cultural topics, guiding questions to help with lesson planning, Project Zero Global Thinking Routines, and the Sustainable Development Goals. 

The second resource in this collection gives instructions for use and was specifically created to guide participants' collection development during the presentation People, Place, and Time: How Art Reflects Culture - Smithsonian Collections.  A collection containing the full presentation slides is available here.

This presentation was given at the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL) 2019 Annual Convention and World Languages Expo on November 23, 2019. Presenters: Marcela Velikovsky (Bullis School), Tess Porter (Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access), and Vicky Masson (Norwood School).

Vicky Masson
31
 

My ethnic studies musings

This collection was started as a way to share resources related to Mexican American Studies.  It has now morphed into a larger collection for anyone interested in ethnic studies.  It is still very much a work in progress.

Rubina Pantoja
30
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