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Found 629 Collections

 

University of Brasilia - Ancient Greek Art (Universidade de Brasília - Arte Grega Antiga)

Coleção sobre arte grega antiga e representações posteriores de sua cultura.

Jaqueline Ribeiro
29
 

University of Brasilia - Animal Representation Through The Ages

Different types of statues, paintings, and other artistic representation of animals from the past and the present.

Tiago Carvalho
38
 

University of Brasilia - Brasões/Coat of Arms

Coleção de Brasões e Escudos para serem estudados por estudantes de Heráldica em seu estudo dessa ciência.

Jade Deus
14
 

University of Brasilia - comics

desenhos em quadrinhos que não possuem cores

Joana Diniz
26
 

University of Brasilia - Famous People

Famous and important people that made history.

Tiago Carvalho
15
 

University of Brasilia - Fotos antigas da Bahia

Coleção que reúne fotos antigas da Bahia, Brasil.

Gabriel Amaral
17
 

University of Brasilia - Gods of Greece

Obras de arte representando alguns deuses gregos

Omar Silva
15
 

University of Brasilia - O hábito da leitura

Coleção sobre a representação do hábito da leitura em pinturas, gravuras, etc.

Ariel Carvalho Gomes
31
 

University of Brasilia - Picasso

Collection about Picasso, life and work. (IDEIA: Sou bibliotecária e a instituição para qual trabalho irá lançar uma exposição sobre o pintor Pablo Picasso, logo para chamar a atenção dos usuários foram selecionadas imagens e videos que serão postadas na homepage da instituição demonstrando o tema da exposição.)

Isabela Borges de Matos
18
 

University of Brasilia - Pixar Warehouse

Collection of sketchs and characters from the Pixar Animation Studios.

Tiago Carvalho
37
 

University of Brasilia - Sufrágio Feminino

O movimento pelo sufrágio feminino é um movimento social, político e econômico de reforma, com o objetivo de estender o sufrágio (o direito de votar) às mulheres. Participam do sufrágio, mulheres ou homens, denominados sufragistas.


Nair Oliveira
14
 

University of Brasilia -> Cartoons

Random Cartoons can lead to some reflection or not.

Gabriel Fonseca Correia
12
 

University of Brasilia Photographic Equipment and Production Records/Archival

Photographic equipment as instruments to production of archival information

Cristiane Santos
7
 

University of Brasilia- Brazilian music

Esta coleção está destinada a mostrar um pouco da diversidade musical do Brasil

Adriana Dornellas
25
 

University of Brasilia; Brazilian Flora and Fauna

A collection about Brazilian Nature, mainly Cerrado to use with students from public schools in Taguatinga with Catholic University of Brasilia teachers support.

Nita P.
13
 

University of Brasilia; History and Culture through food

The collection had approached the story through food

Francelle Cavalcante
9
 

Unlikely friendships

"Culture is often difficult to define, but it influences everything from who you are as an individual to how you relate to other people at home and around the world. " from Cultural Conversations (2014)

Cultural conversations have been important to the development of the United States since its inception. To start cultural conversations among my students, I have gathered a collection of artifacts that give a brief history of Frederick Douglass and Abraham Lincoln during the Civil War. Douglass and Lincoln would ordinarily have not been friends,  but because of their relationship, history was changed forever! Other Friendships worth investigating: WEB DuBois and Woodrow Wilson (as well as William Monroe Trotter), Lyndon B Johnson and Martin Luther King, Jr., Thomas Jefferson and Benjamin Banneker, and Eleanor Roosevelt and Mary McLeod Bethune.

#NPGteach

#visiblethinking


Jeryl Payne
25
 

Unpacking Sol LeWitt’s Open Cubes

Students will analyze Sol LeWitt's variations of the open cube to apply their knowledge of drawing cubes using isometric paper and nets of cubes. Students will extend their knowledge of surface area while observing LeWitt's Cube without a cube and make a generalization for two formulas.

This is an activity for a grade 6 or 7 geometry class. Prerequisite knowledge: volume, surface area and nets of cubes.

Students can do the work in groups of 2-3 there are sections for thinking routines and prompts for students to upload photos of their work.

Amanda Riske
8
 

Unveiling Stories: Children at Work

I created this collection to have my students understand better the role children played in the past. Considering how quickly I have to teach history to my 4th graders I wanted to rely on photographs to help orient the students into time and place. I focused on the late 1800s into the mid-1900s. The students in my class wanted to know more about children's lives during the time period we were learning about. The purpose of the collection is to push the students to think beyond what they immediately see and consider the bigger ideas captured in these photographs.

#goglobal

Students engaged in thinking routines during this activity:

See, Think, Wonder

  • What do you see?
  • What do you think?
  • What do you wonder?

Unveiling Stories

  • What is the story?
  • What is the human story?
  • What is the world story?
  • What is the new story?
  • What is the hidden story?

Ellen Rogers
15
 

Upward Bound Tech & Tour - Intro to the Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access' Learning Lab

Taking a great portrait is more than just taking a quick snap of a face. It requires thoughtful contemplation and a variety of choices by the photographer. We'll examine a collection of photographs that illustrate various principles of portrait photography and that will help students to understand the parts of a digital artifact. 

LENS 1 | One lens to consider when looking at an artifact is its context and the impression it gives you. Using "see, think, wonder" strategies, we consider:

  • What do you see?
  • What do you think about it?
  • What makes you say that -- what evidence is there for that - on what are you basing your opinion?
  • What does it make you wonder?
  • Why does something look the way it does or the way it is?


LENS 2 | Analyzing great photographs to provide inspiration for your own photography pursuits 

What makes a strong image?

  • angles (eye-level, high angle, low angle, and bird's eye);
  • light and shadow;
  • framing;
  • shot length (long-shot, medium-shot, close-up, & extreme close-up);
  • mood--capturing a feeling or emotion in a photograph; 
  • scale--how big or small subjects look; and
  • sense of place--capturing the feeling of a place. 

Click into each photo and on the "paper clip" annotation icon to read more information (metadata!)

We will then discuss publishing guidelines and other policies that will help students make their best collections.

Tags: portrait photography, decision-making, self-determination, student empowerment, Project Zero


Tracie Spinale
43
 

Video

#CIEDigitialStoryTelling.
OSMAR CHACON
1
 

Vietnam War for novel The Things They Carried

This collection has images of the Vietnam War to background the novel The Things They Carried.     This collection should help to answer the compelling question; was the Vietnam War justified?

#TeachingInquiry

June Bohr
5
 

Views on foreigners during the Edo Period - Intro Lesson

This lesson serves as an introduction to the Edo Period in Japan. The module is centered around the artwork "Southern Barbarians," a folding screen painting depicting the arrival of Portuguese traders to a Japanese port, a common scene previous to the Sakoku (closed country) period. After a close analysis of the folding screen, students contrast the scene depicted in the artwork with the proscriptions of the Sakoku edict of 1635 and the Portuguese exclusion edict of 1639. The stark contrast between these two trade scenarios will help students understand the nuance of the political and economic situation of Edo Japan. Additionally, transitioning from a scene where international trade is robust and ordinary, to the drafting of these two edicts severely curtailing this very trade, will lead students to inquire into the extent, as well as the limitations of the closed country period. 


Lesson plan (1 - 2 hours) 

1. "Southern Barbarians" illustrates and extends understanding of the ‘Nanbanjin’ as well as Nanban trade previous to Edo Japan. 'Nanbanjin' referred to Southern European, usually Spanish and Portuguese. The teacher will explain the main traits of Nanban art in order to elucidate further details of the artwork other than the ones that the students observe during the routine. 

For further reference on Nanban Art, read pages 71-142 of the book referenced here. The text contains multiple other examples of folding screens from the period.

See: 

Weston, Victoria. Portugal, Jesuits and Japan: Spiritual Beliefs and Earthly Goods. Chestnut Hill, MA: McMullen Museum of Art, Boston College, 2013. Print.

Link to online copy: https://archive.org/details/portugaljesuitsj00west 

2. Class completes a 'See, Think, Wonder' routine with the resource "Southern Barbarians in Japan." The artwork is full of details (such as the man carrying fabric from another Asian port because the Portuguese served as relay traders in the region). This routine might take 30 minutes or more to complete for this reason. 

As part of a World History class, the teacher could highlight these historic "easter eggs" in the artwork and tie in other topics from class such as cotton and silk trade, slavery, navigation technology, missionaries in the East or the Portuguese empire and extension among other subjects present in the folding screen.  

While at first, the Project Zero routines will help to understand the period, the actors and the reasons for drafting the two edicts, the teacher should also emphasize at the end of the routine why this type of art existed and how Japanese viewed Nanban trade. The purpose is to begin the discussion of Edo Japan with an understanding of the complex world of foreign relations, cultural forces and international commerce at the time.  

3. Following this analysis, students perform a close reading and discussion of the edicts of 1635 and 1639. The Project Zero routine 'Explanation Game' should help guide the reading of the edicts. Students first read the edicts on their own, clarify obtuse language, and highlight a few proscriptions that they believe define the Sakoku period. Following this, students complete the 'Explanation Game' routine in small groups. 

4. At the end of this introductory lesson, the teacher leads a group discussion on the edicts, establishing the main proscriptions and political reasons to ban the Portuguese traders. Teacher should clarify the political and social situation of Japan at the time, the presence of the Spanish and Portuguese traders in neighboring countries and the expansion of their respective empires. If class will continue exploring the nuances of the Edo Period, then the teacher could also briefly explain the difference in operations between the Dutch traders and the Portuguese traders. 


Additional resources

Mini-lesson plan (30 minutes)

The remaining resources in this collection allow to further explore the other foreigners in Edo Japan in order to nuance the discussion of international trade and foreign relations during the period. Smaller groups of 3-5 students can analyze separately various ukiyo-e of foreigners, while completing a 'Question Starts' visible thinking routine and discussing their findings at the end of class period with their classmates. 

Denise Rodriguez
11
 

Virginia History Told Through Stamps

Significant persons and events from Virginia History are told through U.S. Stamps.  Discover the history of the Old Dominion.

Nancy Butler
24
553-576 of 629 Collections