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Found 6,319 Collections

 

The Revolutionary War

The Revolutionary War or the American Revolution was one of the biggest turning points in world history as it marked the beginning of a world superpower. It showed the world that revolts were possible and the seemingly under powered colonists can stand up for themselves. It was a conflict that resulted from colonists realizing the conditions of their livelihood which was brought to light by the Enlightenment. A chain of laws and events would eventually lead to the colonists wanting to secede from England thus triggering the American Revolution.

The collection begins with the pamphlet Common Sense which sparked the reality of the colonists' livelihood. It'll feature prominent figures of the era such as Nathan Hale and the founding fathers in the painting of the signing of the Declaration of Independence. We will look at objects the Continental Army's men carried with them like weapons and their personal belongings in chests. Nearing the end, there will be examples of tea ceramics decorated with references to the war to celebrate it and even music. There are also postcards from the World War II era that refer to the American Revolution to show how symbolic it is to the country.

Randy Park
20
 

The Revolutionary War Era

Turning Points Review Project

Jeremy Valtairo
3
 

The Revolutionary War's Combat

During the Revolutionary War, many new weapons and battle strategies were created. The reasoning for the war was for freedom from the British. At the time the British was a powerful nation, so to have to go into war with them must have been terrifying. The colonies had to produce their own products at that time or get them from other countries, which was difficult due to the resources available and having the British attacking their ports. Many different weapons were used and new producers were formed to keep up with demands. The patriots had to use many tactics to defeat the British in battles.

The following items are examples to what was used in combat and how it started. Some of the items also reflect how journalists portrayed the battles and combat during the time. The first half of the collection is organized as actual items first with the most useful items placed first. The second half of the collection are the events during the Revolutionary War in order of date it occurred. 

Rafaan Ahsan
10
 

The Rise of the Nazi Party - Nazi Ideology

Within this collection, there are many primary sources that are representative of the rise of the Nazi party and ideology of the Nazi party as well. They aid in depicting the gain of power, how such events took place, and what previous events caused such a downfall. These photos portray both the desperation of the people in a time of struggle and the troubles people faced as the ideology of the Nazi party was underway in the country, for such ideas had a major impact on the way Germany was run.

CAROLYN ABRAMOWICH
4
 

The Rise of the Nazi Party - Nazi Ideology

Within this collection, there are many primary sources that are representative of the rise of the Nazi party and ideology of the Nazi party, as well. They aid in depicting the gain of power, how such events took place, and what previous events caused such a downfall. These photos portray both the desperation of the people in a time of struggle and the troubles people faced as the ideology of the Nazi party was underway in the country, for such ideas had a major impact on the way Germany was run.

Makayla Bauer
4
 

The Road to Civil Rights

Sarah Billups
9
 

The Road to Civil Rights

Essential questions:

  • How can we learn more about history through a photograph?
  • How do social factors, such as racism, influence change?
  • How much power do American citizens have to change government policies?
  • What factors drove the Jim Crow era and segregation after the Civil War?
  • How did Americans push back against discrimination, specifically segregation, and fight for civil rights?

This series of lessons is designed as a broad introduction to the factors leading up to the Civil Rights Movement.  Students will look closely at the 13th, 4th, and 15th amendments to the Constitution. Students will then explore some of the factors leading to and consequences of the rise of segregated America during the Jim Crow era in the years following the Civil War. They will look closely at powerful images that exemplify some of the Jim Crow laws, and then explore some of the court cases and responses of citizens that helped to bring about some changes leading up to and during the Civil Rights Movement in the United States.

Time: 3-4 class periods with optional maker project assessment.

Day 1

Anticipatory set: Have students complete a chalk talk to unravel their definitions of equality vs. racism. Discuss and formally define equality and racism. 

Looking closely: Share the image of the water fountains and notice similarities and differences (Optional opportunity to use the See - Think - Wonder thinking routine). Discuss context of Jim Crow era and explain we will be exploring what factors led to these laws and how people fought to change them. 

Have students look closely at the 13th, 14th, and 15th amendments and dissect the language of the amendments to understand their meaning using the Parts, Purposes, Messages thinking routine. Read page one of iCivics Jim Crow handout. Students should record examples of equality and racism on post it notes as they read. When finished, they can add these post it notes to the chalk talk posters with definitions of equality and racism as they discuss their examples. 

Day 2

Anticipatory set: Use the Imagine if... thinking routine to have groups of students explore challenging Jim Crow era issues.

Looking closely: Read "Jim Crow and the Great Migration" and have students continue to record examples of equality vs. racism on post it notes to add to the chalk talk posters from yesterday. Explore powerful Jim Crow images with a chalk talk using the Reporter's Notebook thinking routine.

Discuss how some people began to speak out against the injustices of the Jim Crow laws, both directly and indirectly. Compare and contrast the approaches of Booker T. Washington and  W. E. B. Du Bois. Then read "I, too" by Langston Hughes. Students should complete the See/Hear - Think - Wonder during their first listen. Then students can deconstruct the poem in groups, paying attention to both the literal and figurative meaning of the metaphor of the kitchen in the poem. 

Exit ticket/Reflection: What are the multiple meanings of the kitchen in the poem, "I, too," by Langston Hughes? What was his purpose for writing this poem?

Day 3

Anticipatory set: Use the Making it Fair: Now, Then, Later thinking routine to start to identify how people could have made these Jim Crow restrictions more fair. 

Looking closely: Read "The Road to Civil Rights" handout from iCivics. Students can add equality vs. racism post its to their original chalk talks. Watch the video of the sit-in reenactment (optional - reenact a sit-in in the classroom). Look closely at images of marches, sit-ins, boycotts, and court cases and use the Reporter's Notebook thinking routine to notice the layers of interactions during the events. 

Optional assessment: Introduce the Journey to Civil Rights maker project. Allow students 3-4 days to work on their artifacts and essay explaining their choices.

#PZPGH

Lara Grogan
31
 

The Roaring 1920's

By: Alek Kuzniarski

Alek Kuzniarski
6
 

The Roaring 1920's

By: Alek Kuzniarski

Alek Kuzniarski
6
 

The Roaring 20's

Grace Smakosz
16
 

The Roaring 20's

Elizabeth Readshaw
15
 

The Roaring 20's Collection

Payton Moore
16
 

The Roaring Twenties

The 1920s were a period of tension between new and changing attitudes on the one hand and traditional values and nostalgia on the other. What led to the tension between old and new AND in what ways was the tension manifested?

Molly Chester
44
 

The Roaring Twenties

Anthony Detomo
30
 

The Roaring Twenties

The 1920s were a period of tension between new and changing attitudes on the one hand and traditional values and nostalgia on the other.

Enisa Shoshi
5
 

The Roaring Twenties :)

For APUSH class

Calvin Zheng
8
 

The Roles of Women in the Revolutionary War

This collection represents the many different roles and jobs women had during the Revolutionary War. Many women had to step up during this time and take on certain roles that they were not normally used to. This collection is designed to show the importance of women during this time period and the huge role that they played.

The beginning of the collection shows how even though women were not allowed to serve in the military during this time, many still served as secret soldiers. They would cut their hair and disguise themselves as men. The next few images show the more common roles that women had during this period. Most of them were seamstresses, cooks, and maids. While the man of the household was gone due to war, the women had to take care of the children as well as keep up the house and chores. Lastly, women also served as nurses during this war. Although they didn't perform the actual medical procedures, they would mostly do the cleaning, cooking, and bathing of the patients.

http://historyofmassachusetts....

http://www.womenhistoryblog.co...

https://study.com/academy/less...

Angelica Bufano
10
 

The Roman Empire

As I am writing this I am sitting in a cafe shop in a small town on an island Sardinia in Italy. To this day, the remains of the Roman Empire and it's architecture can be found all over the island, which sparked an interest in me for that great culture and it makes me want to focus this project on that. This project focuses on the architecture of the great Roman empire and the influence that the architecture of the Roman Empire, changes in the way this Culture express itself trough architecture and art work within that architecture. When traveling to a new place, I believe the first thing people notice is the architecture and then they look within. This is exactly what this project will try to do.   

This collection will focus on art throughout of history or Roman Empire and Italy as we know it today. It will start from the Ancient Greece where early Roman Empire drew most of it’s inspiration for art  and architecture and connect various different forms of art and how it interacted with the history of this great nation. I hope you enjoy the collection. 

 #AHMC2019

Ivan Abramovic
18
 

The Romantic Era ♥

The Romantic Era can be characterized as a time for "release." The writers at the time embraced nature and considered nature to hold the truth. The Romantic era was also a backlash against "the enlightenment values of reason in the aftermath of the French Revolution of 1789." (metmuseum.org) This time period reflected the blooming of America as a nation, there was strong anti-British sentiment and much excitement about democracy. The Romantic era highlighted the creative capabilities of America and is responsible for giving us literary giants such as Edgar Allan Poe, Walt Whitman and Nathaniel Hawthorne. 

Victoria Ajao
15
 

the rosewood massacre

a white women accused a black man of attacking her witch set off a weeks worth of shooting and burnings as whites from sumner rampaged through rosewood by the end six black and two whites died

devon english
2
 

The Royal Proclamation of 1763

The Royal Proclamation of 1763, opened the Western Frontier, when the French surrendered the land to Britain, after the French and Indiana War, also known as the Seven Years War. The Western Frontier line was all of the land West of the Appalachian Mountains. Britain did not want the colonists and the Indians fighting; therefore, Britain put out the Royal Proclamation of 1763, stating that the colonists could not occupy, or even go past the Western Frontier. The colonists that had already established homes past these boundaries were demanded to leave. The Proclamation gave relief to the Indians that feared that the colonists would run them off of their land again. The colonists did not like the idea of Britain putting limitations on them from thousands of miles away; consequently, the colonists rebelled (Proclamation of 1763 proc63.html ). 

Bradon Cobb
10
 

The Salem Witch Trials

The Salem Witch Trials was a mass-hysteria event that started in February 1692 to May 1693 in Salem, Massachusetts. However, many historians have argued that it first took place some time in the spring. It all started when a group of young girls were diagnosed with "strange behavior" by a doctor-- and the only doctor-- in Salem. These girls showed signs of hallucinations, jolting movements, and occasional screaming and tantrums, as the doctor proved that it was all due to "supernatural causes." After the diagnosis of those girls, they were taken to court soon after for a testimony of their behavior but was eventually proved not guilty. People began to see others acting in strange manners in a span of a few months, saying that these people have been controlled by the devil. As these people continued to be condemned for witchcraft, the population of Salem decreased due for a crime that was perceived punishable by death. 

As you move into this collection, you will be able to note the artifacts, and the people involved in the Salem Witch Trials. For each item in the collection, it will explain how these items influenced how the Puritans saw witches as people who sided with the devil, and how much they want to keep their land as pure, or holy as possible. 

Anna Dinh
10
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