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Found 6,370 Collections

 

The Irish Experience in Pittsburgh

Created for the AIU3 workshop on 3/17/17, this topical collection includes images from Historic Pittsburgh (http://digital.library.pitt.edu/images/pittsburgh/), the Smithsonian Collection, the records of the Ancient Order of Hibernians in the Detre Library and Archives, Heinz History Center, and additional web resources. This large group of documents is intended to be shaped and whittled into useful collections for individual classrooms. Teachers might consider linking the documents to themes like:

•Immigration

•Push and Pull factors

•Growth of social networks

•Assimilation

•Nativism

•Contributions (Political, Cultural, Military, Philanthropy)

•Industry in Western PA

•Labor Movement


To make this collection your own, copy it and then use the edit feature to add and remove documents as well as contribute any annotations that might help your students.

Kate Harris
29
 

The Iñupiaq People and Their Culture

By Beverly Faye Hugo (Iñupiaq), 2009

(This is shortened version of a longer essay from the Smithsonian book Living Our Cultures, Sharing Our Heritage: The First Peoples of Alaska.)

Sea, Land, Rivers

There’s ice and snow, the ocean and darkness – darkness in the winter and twenty-four hours of daylight in the summer. Barrow was originally called Utqiaġvik (meaning, “the place where ukpik, the snowy owl, nests”). That’s where my people, the Iñupiat, have survived and lived, and I am doing as they have done. On the Arctic coast you can see vast distances in all directions, out over the ocean and across the land. The country is very flat, with thousands of ponds and lakes, stretching all the way to the Brooks Range in the south. It is often windy, and there are no natural windbreaks, no trees, only shrubs. Beautiful flowers grow during the brief summer season. The ocean is our garden, where we hunt the sea mammals that sustain us. Throughout the year some seasonal activity is going on. We are whaling in the spring and fall, when the bowheads migrate past Barrow, going out for seals and walrus, fishing, or hunting on the land for caribou, geese, and ducks.

Whaling crews are made up of family members and relatives, and everyone takes part. The spring is an exciting time when the whole community is focused on the whales, hoping to catch one. The number we are permitted to take each year is set by the Alaska Eskimo Whaling Commission and the International Whaling Commission. Whaling is not for the faint of heart. It can be dangerous and takes an incredible amount of effort – getting ready, waiting for the whales, striking and pulling and towing them. But the men go out and do it because they want to feed the community. Everyone has to work hard throughout the whaling season. People who aren’t able to go out on the ice help in other ways, such as buying supplies and gas or preparing food. You have to make clothing for them; they need warm parkas, boots, and snow pants.

We believe that a whale gives itself to a captain and crew who are worthy people, who have integrity – that is the gift of the whale. Caring for whales, even after you’ve caught them, is important. After a whale is caught and divided up, everyone can glean meat from the bones. Each gets his share, even those who don’t belong to a crew. No one is left out.

We are really noticing the effects of global warming. The shorefast ice is much thinner in spring than it used to be, and in a strong wind it will sometimes break away. If you are out on the ice, you have to be extremely conscious of changes in the wind and current so that you will not be carried off on a broken floe. We are concerned as well about the effects of offshore drilling and seismic testing by the oil companies. They try to work with the community to avoid problems, but those activities could frighten the whales and be detrimental to hunting.

 

Community and Family

Iñupiaq residents of Barrow, Wales, Point Hope, Wainwright, and other coastal communities, are the Taġiuqmiut, “people of the salt.” People who live in the interior are the Nunamiut, “people of the land.” The Nunamiut used to be nomadic, moving from camp to camp with their dog teams, hunting and fishing to take care of their families. They packed light and lived in skin tents, tracking the caribou and mountain sheep. My husband, Patrick Hugo, was one of them. For the first six years of his life his family traveled like that, but when the government built a school at Anaktuvuk Pass in 1959 they settled there.

My parents, Charlie and Mary Edwardson, were my foremost educators. They taught me my life skills and language. When I came to awareness as a young child, all the people who took care of me spoke Iñupiaq, so that was my first language. Our father would trap and hunt. We never went hungry and had the best furs for our parkas. Our mother was a fine seamstress, and we learned to sew by helping her. My mother and grandmother taught us to how to care for a family and to do things in a spirit of cooperation and harmony.

I was a child during the Bureau of Indian Affairs era, when we were punished for speaking Iñupiaq in school. My first day in class was the saddest one of my young life. I had to learn English, and that was important, but my own language is something that I value dearly and have always guarded. It is a gift from my parents and ancestors, and I want to pass it on to my children and grandchildren and anyone who wants to learn.

 

Ceremony and Celebration

Nalukataq (blanket toss) is a time of celebration when spring whaling has been successful. It is a kind of all-day picnic. People visit with friends and family at the windbreaks that the crews set up by tipping the whale boats onto their sides. At noon they serve niġliq (goose) soup, dinner rolls, and tea. At around 3:00 P.M. we have mikigaq, made of fermented whale meat, tongue, and skin. At 5:00 they serve frozen maktak (whale skin and blubber) and quaq (raw frozen fish). It’s wonderful to enjoy these foods, to talk, and catch up with everyone at the end of the busy whaling season.

Kivgik, the Messenger Feast, was held in the qargi (ceremonial house). The umialgich (whaling captains) in one community sent messengers to the leaders of another, inviting them and their families to come for days of feasting, dances, and gift giving. They exchanged great quantities of valuable things – piles of furs, sealskins filled with oil, weapons, boats, and sleds. That took place until the early years of the twentieth century, when Presbyterian missionaries suppressed our traditional ceremonies, and many of the communal qargich in the villages were closed down.

In 1988, Mayor George Ahmaogak Sr. thought it was important to revitalize some of the traditions from before the Christian era, and Kivgik was started again. Today it is held in the high school gymnasium. People come to Barrow from many different communities to take part in the dancing and maġgalak, the exchange of gifts. You give presents to people who may have helped you or to those whom you want to honor.  Kivgiq brings us together as one people, just as it did in the time of our ancestors.

Tags: Iñupiaq, Inupiaq, Alaska Native, Indigenous, Smithsonian Arctic Studies Center in Alaska, whale, whaling, human geography

Smithsonian Arctic Studies Center in Alaska
20
 

The Kennedys

This is a topical collection of resources depicting the Kennedy family.
Linda Muller
21
 

The KKK

This is a collection with at least 5 "artifacts" giving a basic knowledge on what the KKK is. This is for a presentation, made by Liam and I.

Nathan Stillwell
5
 

The Korean War Collection

A short collection with a few interesting things in regards to the Korean War

Frank Gutierrez
7
 

The Leaders of a New World

This collection explores George Washington's personal achievements as well as his personal life. The role of presidency has evolved significantly since his time during the Revolutionary War. He and his wife, Martha Washington, had a relationship unlike any other. She held a crucial role as First Lady and was George's partner through thick and thin, even starting a women's movement to aid soldiers during the war. This collection depicts the struggles of a couple who had to create the foundation of a nation after it was nearly destroyed. Originally a land surveyor in Virginia, George Washington would soon become the leader of the Continental Army and Britain's greatest foe. The impact he and his family made on the U.S. still lingers to this day.

Caleb Floyd
11
 

The Lewis and Clark Expedition

Idaho State Museum
21
 

The Living Room War-How the Vietnam War changed American culture

Resources to exemplify how the war in Vietnam shaped the culture of our country, including art, book excerpts, song lyrics, op-eds, and stories about how even the Vietnam War memorial caused controversy.

#SAAMTeach

Amanda Dillard
12
 

The Louvre

Collections from the Louvre

Christy LaGue
3
 

The Luxurious Consumer Revolution.

This exhibit provides a look into the Consumer Revolution of England. The collection illustrates the consumerism culture of the English during the 1700's and 1800's. A dramatic change in lifestyles between the classes we're shown through materialistics means. Many factors contributed to this such as new consumer goods, more money,  and impulsitivity to buy. The goods were a way to show off one's wealth during this time.


All images shown are not mine.

Henny Dominguez Gomez
10
 

The Magic Boxes of D-Day: How One Humble Invention Helped Make Operation Neptune Possible

This presentation will focus on how technology can be simple but when employed in an innovative fashion, also transformative.

Presenter: Frank Blazich, Jr., PhD; Lead Curator of Military History at the National Museum of American History

#112MCF

Smithsonian Material Culture Forum
37
 

The Making of a Champion

Students will look beyond physical characteristics to determine how individuals are labeled "champions" by modern society. 

Susan Sturdy-Posner
8
 

The March on Washington

The Civil Rights Movement of the 1950s and 60s tackled many problems facing African-Americans at the time. This collection offers a brief video introduction into the March on Washington in 1963, which brought national attention to many of these issues, and asks students to analyze a photograph and three artifacts from the March. Students will answer the question "What problems did participants in the March on Washington aim to solve?" and consider how these issues continue to have relevance in the United States today.

tags: Civil Rights, Martin Luther King, A. Phillip Randolph
Carol Sponholtz
7
 

The March on Washington

The Civil Rights Movement of the 1950s and 60s tackled many problems facing African-Americans at the time. This collection offers a brief video introduction into the March on Washington in 1963, which brought national attention to many of these issues, and asks students to analyze a photograph and three artifacts from the March. Students will answer the question "What problems did participants in the March on Washington aim to solve?" and consider how these issues continue to have relevance in the United States today.

tags: Civil Rights, Martin Luther King, A. Phillip Randolph
Kate Harris
6
 

The Maya People Today

This collection includes many videos, in English and Spanish, and resources showing how the Mayan people living today have preserved their traditions while adjusting to modern life. Students can use the collection to learn about the values and traditions that remain important in Mayan life today.

Those who want to learn more about the ancient Maya should view this collection:
https://learninglab.si.edu/collections/the-achievements-of-ancient-mayan-civilization/Cb7G8r7LdVF6mGqm
Kate Harris
23
 

The Mayans

This collection was created for Honors World Studies to be an introduction to the Maya Civilization. Items in this collection were found via Smithsonian Learning Lab and additional outside research. Appropriate citations have been included.

Amelia Ingraham
12
 

The Mayans

This collection was created for Honors World Studies to be an introduction to the Maya Civilization.  Items in this collection were found via Smithsonian Learning Lab and additional outside research.  Appropriate citations have been included.

Isaiah Hyser
10
 

The Memorable Bike Accident

These few photographs are mostly people drawn photos. They are all consisting around my memory of my bike accident. These photos resemble the scenery to where i was headed. Some of the pictures resemble the pain i was in and the help people tried to offer me.

Samantha Barone
10
 

The Mexican - American War

The Mexican-American War, which took place from 1846 to 1848, marked the United States first battle on foreign soil. Under the presidency of James K. Polk, the 11th president, America would expand more than one-third (History.com).
The main causes of the Mexican – American War was disputes of land. President James K. Polk belied in the idea of the Manifest Destiny, and ideal that America not only  had the God given right to occupy and civilize North America, but was destined to. He had his sights set on what is known today as the American Southwest; California, Utah, Nevada, Arizona, New Mexico, and Western Colorado (Mt. Holyoke College). 
After an offer from President Polk to buy the land along California and New Mexico was rejected, Polk proceeded to place troops along the Rio Grande and the Neuces River, therefore instigating the first battle of the Mexican American War (Gordon). 
The first attack broke out on April 25th, 1846, on General Zachary Taylor and his soldiers, killing about a sixteen people (Stevenson). 
After two years of battle, on February 2, 1848, the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo established the Rio Grande as the United States- American border. Mexico also recognized that the United States had possession of Texas, and sold California and the rest of the Northern Territory of the Rio Grande for $15 million (Stevenson). 

Kayla McIntyre
10
 

The Mexican-American War: Before, During, and After

The purpose of this collection is to have students consider the causes and consequences of the Mexican-American War. Students will analyze each item in the collection and determine whether it represents the time period before the war, during, or after. Then students will answer a set of broad questions about the war. While most items in the collection have accompanying text, students may need to consult their textbooks or outside resources in order to answer some questions.
Kate Harris
18
 

The Middle Ages: Discover the Story

This collection includes objects and artifacts representing life in the Middle Ages. Students are challenged to write a creative story or narrative based on the objects in the collection, illustrating life at the time. The last two resources in the collection are a worksheet that teachers may use to frame the assignment and a grading rubric for the assignment.
Kate Harris
12
 

The Middle East

A collection of resources depicting the countries that make up the Middle East.
Linda Muller
26
 

The Military Draft

This collection can be used for a teaching activity on the military draft in the United States and how it has changed over time from the Civil War to the Vietnam War. Students will consider attitudes towards the draft, its effects, and means of avoiding the draft in different eras. What trends or patterns emerge? What changes? Why is the draft no longer in use?

Tags: conscription, draft, selective service, Civil War, World War I, World War II, WWI, WWII, WW2, Vietnam War, change over time, continuity and change, exemption

Kate Harris
23
 

The Mondales

Collections related to Walter and Joan Mondale. #iste2016
Shana Crosson
13
5305-5328 of 6,370 Collections