Skip to Content
  • Language
  • End User
  • Educational Use
  • Time Required
(1,021)
(5,070)
(5,213)
(3,799)
(5,809)
(68)
(2,044)
(1,503)
(634)
(2,700)
(1,058)
(928)

Found 6,091 Collections

 

EWP Biographical Primary Sources Collection

Primary sources for my African American Biography unit

Evie Weinstein-Park
59
 

Engineering Flight

This is a master collection designed to be copied and adapted to your individual classroom needs. Included are three scalable student activities that teach students engineering skills using methods similar to those that made the Wright brothers pioneers of aviation. Feel free to pick and choose from the activities in creating your own collections:

1. The Four Forces of Flight

In this student activity, students will briefly go over the four forces of flight (lift, drag, weight, and thrust) and put them to the test in the Paper Airplane Challenge! This activity is suitable for Primary/Intermediate grade levels.

2. Engineering the Wright Way

The second student activity is an online interactive, "Engineering the Wright Way"*, where students will develop engineering skills to design and test all the different components of an airplane based on the the Wrights' methodology. Students can write down a save code generated in the interactive to store their progress and return to finish the activity later. This activity is suitable for Intermediate/Middle grade levels.

3. Take a Wright Flight

The third student activity is an online flight simulator to learn three controls of flight: yaw, pitch, and roll. The final segment is an online interactive** to test fly the original Wright Flyer in conditions similar to that cold December morning when the Wrights first achieved flight, using direct 3D scans of the original Wright Flyer made by the Smithsonian. This activity is suitable for all grades.


*The "Engineering the Wright Way" lesson plan and activity were created by the National Air and Space Museum, courtesy of the Alcoa Foundation.

**The Wright Brothers Flyer activity was created by the Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access.

This is one of 5 activities used in the Lenovo Week of Service event.

Carmella Doty
19
 

George Catlin: Lives of the Plains Indians

Long before the camera went west, artists like George Catlin were preserving the images of the native Americans on the western plains. Catlin's paintings are numerous and divide into two genre: the group activities and portraiture. This learning lab focuses on group activities of many plains indians including hunting, traditional dances, and recreation. #cgmd19

Carmella Doty
32
 

Life of Graser

Frank Graser is a high school teacher to some, a friend to most, and a mystery to all. He's done it all, from owning pigeons, to being a hypnotist, to owning a 36 year strong funnel cake business. The interview with him was eye opening and showed just how much he's done in his life. It seems like there isn't much Graser can't do.

Graser, Frank. Personal Interview. 29 April 2019.

Abigail Ottwell
3
 

Journey through an Exploded Star: An Online Interactive

In this collection, students will explore the life cycle of stars and learn about the connection between elements and space. They'll explore real data that provides evidence for the dispersal of several elements produced by the explosion of massive stars, specifically through the Cassiopeia A supernova. Then they’ll put their knowledge into practice by navigating the remains of the supernova in the online interactive “Journey through an Exploded Star.”

  1. The activity begins with “DISCOVER." The students will go through a series of slides, learning first how the visible spectrum of light is only a small part of the entire electromagnetic spectrum, about the different telescopes scientists use to view the electromagnetic radiation across that spectrum, and finally how they've used that data to form a composite view of our universe, specifically through a 3D model of the Cassiopeia A supernova.
  2. In the "EXPLORE" activity, students examine the 3D visualization of data, compiled by astrophysicist Tracey DeLaney, to understand how and why scientists study supernovas such as Cassiopeia A: to gain a comprehensive picture of the cosmos.
  3. The “PLAY” online interactive then takes the students on a first-person flight through the center of this exploded star. The interactive is split into two parts: The first part is a 2 minute guided fly-through, where Kim Arcand, project lead of the original 3D visualization found in the collection, explains the different forms of light and the elements that are traceable under those spectrums. The second is a free explore option, where students are able to manipulate the different spectrums by adjusting filters as they choose. Both parts of the interactive reinforce what they’ve previously learned within the collection about light across the EMS. This interactive works across browsers and requires no software downloads. Also included is a 360 video tour that works on mobile devices and Google Cardboard.
  4. Finally, three extension activities are included. The first allows students to take photographs using real MicroObservatory robotic telescopes located at Smithsonian Observatory sites in Cambridge, Massachusetts and Amado, Arizona to create their very own authentic astrophotographs. They’ll use specialized image processing software to bring out visual details from images of objects like the Moon, Sun, star clusters, nebulas, and galaxies. The second, "Recoloring the Universe," is a suite of resources that use astrophysical data to teach basic coding. The third resource, "How to Be a Scientist: Careers in Astronomy" highlights the career and data visualization work of astronomer Kimberly Arcand. 

This online activity could be used to augment study about the forms of radiation light can take, learning about supernovae and what happens after a star explodes, as well as learning about some of the different careers in science that are available (astrophysicists, astrophotographers, engineers, and visualization experts). As with all Learning Lab collections, it is built to be freely modified and adapted to fit your specific needs. 

Marce Rubio
22
 

Living Systems

Diverse living organisms fill our planet with beauty and wonder.  Plants, animals and many other creatures may seem to exist on their own, when in reality they are interdependent with the world that surrounds them, living and non-living.  Co-existing with other plants, animals, and man, each living organism is part of a grand, intricately woven web and system that allows for the flow of energy, food and life. Producers, consumers, predators and prey play vital roles in sustaining life on Earth.  This collection provides the opportunity to consider how each organism affects others. A Harvard University Project Zero routine has been included.

Nancy Butler
27
 

Teaching with Haitian Art and Heritage with Frost Collection

Understanding Haitian Culture though Art

This lesson will support teaching Haitian traditions and culture through the Frost Art Museum collections. It will also provide a look into cultural identity, Haitianite supported by research conducted by two FIU faculty members .  The PowerPoint will expand on Haitian history and the notes will add talking points. The  Miami Dade County Public School lessons support various investigations from the past to the present.

Connections to the Polish Black Virgin demonstrate the spread of culture and religious beliefs that traveled as countries were conquered.

Mirmac16
24
 

Webinar: Global Competence Strategies for World Language Classrooms

This collection was created for the webinar with SCLDA on May 8th, 2019. It is based on three collections created by Marcela Velikovsky (Bullis School) and Vicky Masson (Christ Episcopal School) as part of the  2018 Smithsonian Virtual Teacher Curricula Creation Opportunity with the Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access (SCLDA), and thanks to the Smithsonian Latino Center's Latino Initiative Pool funds.

These collections highlight Latin American works of art, that show how culture shapes the way we see the world, others, and ourselves, and they also raise awareness about Latinx diversity. They explore “People, Place, and Time: How Art Reflects Culture.” Products, practices and perspectives displayed in Latinx art, show how our place and history (past) influence who we are (present) and who we want to be (future) in geographical, social, economic, and/or historical contexts.

#LatinoHAC, #Global Competence, #SDGs, #TeachSDGs, #World Language, #Spanish, 

Vicky Masson
71
 

Gatsby - (specifically) Valley of the Ashes

This is a pictorial collection of what the "Valley of the Ashes," from Chapter 2 of "The Great Gatsby," might look like. It is used for a Chapter 2 review and discussion. (Please see the attached short answer questions and assignment.) 

Annette Spahr
4
 

Rebel Without A Cause/ Fruitvale Station

This is my collection of images that connect with this film pairing,

ms.hughesteachesenglish
43
 

Paintings for Writing

A collection of paintings to use with various writing prompts.

Tracy Robertson
7
 

Defining Moments

There are defining moments that forever change who we are in history.  This collection shares a few  events that significantly impacted the nation and beyond.  It includes Harvard's Project Zero thinking routines.  

Nancy Butler
23
 

Samantha's Collection - The Unique and Creative Design Process

While working at the Cooper Hewitt Design Scholars program, we did multiple workshops and activities! Here is a collection of photos of the creative design process while we participated in the workshops. We saw and heard and learned from many designers such as Lela Rose, a fashion designer who adds a cool, unique twist on her fashion and her fashion shows. I hope you enjoy viewing my collection! Here is The Unique and Creative Design Process.


Cooper Hewitt Design Scholars
13
 

Julia's collection

Cooper Hewitt Design Scholars
2
 

Area Architects--Quay Dorsey

This is an overview of an area and coding project 3rd grade students completed this year. 

Quay Dorsey
7
 

Webinar: Global Competence Strategies for World Language Classrooms

This collection was created for the webinar with SCLDA on May 8th, 2019. It is based on three collections created by Marcela Velikovsky (Bullis School) and Vicky Masson (Christ Episcopal School) as part of the  2018 Smithsonian Virtual Teacher Curricula Creation Opportunity with the Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access (SCLDA), and thanks to the Smithsonian Latino Center's Latino Initiative Pool funds.

These collections highlight Latin American works of art, that show how culture shapes the way we see the world, others, and ourselves, and they also raise awareness about Latinx diversity. They explore “People, Place, and Time: How Art Reflects Culture.” Products, practices and perspectives displayed in Latinx art, show how our place and history (past) influence who we are (present) and who we want to be (future) in geographical, social, economic, and/or historical contexts.

#LatinoHAC, #Global Competence, #SDGs, #TeachSDGs, #World Language, #Spanish, 

Marcela Velikovsky
70
 

Sustainable by Design

Students identify needs in their community and design a building to fit that need using Agency by Design framework and protocols. Designed for a collaborative unit with Environmental Science and Sculpture High School students. #goglobal

Ashley Beck
33
 

Environmental Advocacy through Art

This collection was designed to enable students to reflect deeply on their understanding of local and global human impacts on the planet and how they can inspire others to care about/collectively work to solve one of these issues.  Students will use Project Zero Thinking Routines to examine various pieces of environmental art before they create their own visual call to action focused on the environmental issue that they care most about.

Global Competency Connection:

  • This project was designed to be the culminating learning experience in a high school Environmental Science class, thus it is the expectation that students have “investigated the world” as they explored environmental and social issues throughout the course.  
  • This project will incorporate a level of choice as students “communicate their ideas” on the environmental issue that resonated most with them.
  • As a part of the project, students will share their campaigns with their teachers, peers, and families, and through this awareness raising thus “take action” on issues of global significance.

Using the Collection: A detailed description of daily activities can be found within the "Lesson Sequence" document. Additionally, notes regarding the use of each Project Zero Thinking Routine are documented as annotations within each individual Thinking Routine tile and provide specific instructions on how align these routines with this collection.  

#GoGlobal #ProjectZero #EnvironmentalScience

Aleah Myers
40
 

Benefits and Challenges of the Industrial Revolution

This is a collection of images that represent the different aspects, issues, events, and people of the Industrial Age (1870-1910), including urbanization, immigration, working conditions, growth of industries, and technological innovations.

Melanie Kirchhof
11
 

Americanization - Impact on American Indians and Immigrants (1860-1920)

This collection includes before and after images of American Indians and Immigrants who have been"Americanized."

Melanie Kirchhof
7
 

AIR AND SPACE: Air Moves!

Talk with Me!

Having conversations with young children contributes to their thinking and language development. All conversations are good, but research shows that the quality of words children hear matters more than the quantity. Further, what’s best is an exchange; in other words, talk with children, not at them.

The Talk with Me Toolkits give parents and caregivers thematically organized high-quality, authentic materials to make children their conversational partners in discussions that matter. Each online toolkit features captivating videos and real-world photographs, as well as intriguing paintings and other artworks to observe and discuss through conversation prompts.  Hands-on activities and books complete each toolkit. Simple instructions appear right in the toolkits, so you can jump right in. See what interests your child and get started. There’s a lot to talk about!

To read more, see, from the Harvard Graduate School of Education’s Usable Knowledge site, The Brain-Changing Power of Conversation.

Talk With Me Toolkit
14
 

AIR & SPACE: Can it Fly?

Talk with Me!

Having conversations with young children contributes to their thinking and language development. All conversations are good, but research shows that the quality of words children hear matters more than the quantity. Further, what’s best is an exchange; in other words, talk with children, not at them.

The Talk with Me Toolkits give parents and caregivers thematically organized high-quality, authentic materials to make children their conversational partners in discussions that matter. Each online toolkit features captivating videos and real-world photographs, as well as intriguing paintings and other artworks to observe and discuss through conversation prompts.  Hands-on activities and books complete each toolkit. Simple instructions appear right in the toolkits, so you can jump right in. See what interests your child and get started. There’s a lot to talk about!

To read more, see, from the Harvard Graduate School of Education’s Usable Knowledge site, The Brain-Changing Power of Conversation.

Talk With Me Toolkit
14
 

AIR & SPACE: A Visit to the Museum

Museums are great places for seeing and experiencing new things. Your young scientist will love taking a trip to visit an air and space museum, astronomy museum, or planetarium. 

Your child may be excited to see airplanes, rockets, astronaut gear, or learn about our solar system. There are lots of opportunities to talk and have fun together. This collection provides strategies and activities for adult caregivers visiting the museum with a child.

Talk with Me!

Having conversations with young children contributes to their thinking and language development. All conversations are good, but research shows that the quality of words children hear matters more than the quantity. Further, what’s best is an exchange; in other words, talk with children, not at them.

The Talk with Me Toolkits give parents and caregivers thematically organized high-quality, authentic materials to make children their conversational partners in discussions that matter. Each online toolkit features captivating videos and real-world photographs, as well as intriguing paintings and other artworks to observe and discuss through conversation prompts.  Hands-on activities and books complete each toolkit. Simple instructions appear right in the toolkits, so you can jump right in. See what interests your child and get started. There’s a lot to talk about!

To read more, see, from the Harvard Graduate School of Education’s Usable Knowledge site, The Brain-Changing Power of Conversation.

Talk With Me Toolkit
24
 

Aesthetic and Structure of Design- By Aleah Leary

My collection shows the relationship between the aesthetics/ the visually appealing and the functionality of design. 

Cooper Hewitt Design Scholars
26
5089-5112 of 6,091 Collections