Skip to Content
  • Language
  • End User
  • Educational Use
  • Time Required
(884)
(4,349)
(4,488)
(3,219)
(5,004)
(57)
(1,689)
(1,176)
(483)
(2,336)
(945)
(824)

Found 5,233 Collections

 

Tree Banding

Tree banding is one of the activities included in the SHOUT program, a two-year investigation of land and water issues led by Smithsonian scientists. Watch the videos to learn how to band trees and collect data about their growth and why this information matters.
Stephanie Norby
6
 
 

Designing Change with Postage Stamp

Resources available for teachers to challenge students to solve an interdisciplinary challenge, which is to have the students design a semi-postal stamp.
Motoko Hioki
6
 

Objects that Changed the Way We Live

In this collection, we'll explore everyday objects and their impacts on society. Students can begin by reading an illustrated essay from the National Museum of American History highlighting objects that capture several pivotal moments in innovation. Included in this collection are the clock, the iPod, the bicycle and the cellular phone. What other objects have changed the way we lived?
Ashley Naranjo
11
 

American Inventions and Innovation

Read an article about the opening of the "American Inventions" exhibition in the National Museum of American History. Examine some of the artifacts featured in the exhibition and select one that you believe had the greatest impact. Write a persuasive essay on why this invention is so important.
Stephanie Norby
12
 

Investigating a Place: Niagara Falls

What defines a place? Examine this collection of images from or about Niagara Falls to answer these questions: What are its unique set of physical and cultural conditions? How do these physical and cultural conditions interact? How is Niagara Falls connected to other places? What are the consequences of human activity on the cultural and physical landscape? Ask students individually or in small groups to create a collection in Learning Lab to represent the physical and cultural characteristics of another place. Using these collections, ask students to write summary statements describing the unique human and physical characteristics of places researched. In class discuss student collections and what makes each place unique.
Stephanie Norby
17
 

The Maya People Today

This collection includes many videos, in English and Spanish, and resources showing how the Mayan people living today have preserved their traditions while adjusting to modern life. Students can use the collection to learn about the values and traditions that remain important in Mayan life today.

Those who want to learn more about the ancient Maya should view this collection:
https://learninglab.si.edu/collections/the-achievements-of-ancient-mayan-civilization/Cb7G8r7LdVF6mGqm
Kate Harris
23
 

Droughts and Dust Bowls

This is a collection of teaching resources about droughts and the Dust Bowl. While it is mainly focused on 20th century American history, there are also some links to articles that cover droughts more broadly across time and cultures. I have included some artists (Woody Guthrie, John Steinbeck, nda Dorothea Lange) who recorded the effects of the Dust Bowl on American society. There is also a selection of lesson plans and videos that explain how farming practices and environmental changes lead to droughts, and how people have responded by changing practices and developing new technologies.

Resources in this collection might be used in Language Arts, Social Studies, or Science classrooms. Questions to consider might include:
-How do people impact their environment?
-How do changes to the environment impact peoples' lives?
-How did government and society respond to the disaster of the Dust Bowl?
-What is government's responsibility in times of natural disaster?
-What steps can be taken to prevent future environmental disasters?

Kate Harris
27
 

Aral Sea: Exploring Change Over Time with Satellite Imagery

This teaching collection includes maps and satellite images, complemented by image interpretation guides and related magazine articles, for students to discover what natural causes and human impacts have had consequences for the Aral Sea. The Aral Sea has been a continuously shrinking body of water over the last 50 years after the rivers that fed into it were diverted by irrigation projects. Learn what you can discover by annotating change through satellite imagery.
Ashley Naranjo
18
 

Student Activity: Music as an Environmental Advocacy Approach

In this student activity, explore five musical artists and their connections to environmental advocacy as shared by a Smithsonian Folkways archivist. Inspired by these songs about water issues, you will write lyrics for a song on an environmental theme, incorporating relevant words and imagery.
Ashley Naranjo
9
 

Civil War Deaths, Pictured and Remembered

Inspired by a reading of The Republic of Suffering: Death and the American Civil War, by Drew Gilpin Faust, this is a collection that shows some of the shocking images the public saw of battlefield death, memorials to the dead, and a lesson plan on the art of memorials.
Michelle Smith
11
 

The Achievements of Ancient Mayan Civilization

This collection reviews the major achievements of the ancient Mayan civilization, including its great cities, use of writing, calendar, religious beliefs, art, and architecture. Resources are provided as a basis for student research. Several of the videos are available in Spanish and English and would be useful for a Spanish language teacher who wants students to research the Maya.

Guiding questions to consider while reviewing this collection:
1) In what ways did observation of the sun influence multiple facets of ancient Mayan life?
2) Which elements of ancient Mayan life persist in Mayan culture today?
3) How are art, religion, and architecture seemingly intertwined in ancient Mayan culture?
4) What are the various theories about the demise of the ancient Mayans?

This collection focuses on the achievements of the ancient Mayans; however, it is critical to remember that the Maya are a living people and continue to preserve old traditions while building new ones in the modern world. For those interested, here is a collection on the modern Maya: https://learninglab.si.edu/collections/the-maya-people-today/yKMyzCEPMadkGgA8.
Kate Harris
25
 

How Radio Changed America

The technology for radio communications advanced during World War I, but it wasn't until the 1920s that commercial broadcasting grew and everyone wanted a radio for their home. Radio had a huge impact on creating a "mass media" that bound together the nation. As students explore this collection, they will look for evidence proving that radio changed America in four different areas:
-Politics
-Entertainment and Sports
-Religion
-Advertising

Possible assignments using this collection include:
1) Writing an essay evaluating the statement "Radio created a mass culture in America."
2) Researching a particular figure in radio's early history and sharing findings with classmates.
3) Creating a 1920s radio program that featured key people and trends from the decade. This could be recorded and shared in the form of a podcast.
4) Developing a chart comparing and contrasting the impact of radio with television or the internet.
Kate Harris
25
 

Meryl McMaster and George Catlin

This collection pairs photographs created by contemporary Canadian artist Meryl McMaster that utilize paintings by nineteenth century American painter George Catlin.

McMaster images from Katzman Contemporary (http://www.katzmancontemporary.com/merylmcmaster/ ):
"Meryl McMaster is a Canadian-based artist and a graduate in photography from the Ontario College of Art and Design. Her work explores questions of identity, representation, perception, myth, memory and the environment. Meryl is the recipient of the Canon Canada Prize, the Nora E. Vaughan Award, the Design Medal from OCAD, the Vistek Photography Award, Heartline Pictures Award, and SNAP!Stars TD Award. Her scholarships include the K.M. Hunter Scholarship, the Doris McCarthy Scholarship and the OCAD Admissions Scholarship. McMaster is currently preparing for two concurrent solo new shows in early fall with Katzman Contemporary and the Museum of Contemporary Native Arts in Santa Fe, and prolifically is featuring her past work in solo and group exhibitions across Canada (Art Gallery of Greater Victoria, Dunlop Art Gallery, Mendel Art Gallery, and FOFA Gallery)."
Darren Milligan
8
 

Sports and the African-American Civil Rights Movement

Popular athletes can reflect the broader societal change that is going on around them; they can also be instigators of that change. This collection traces the African-American civil rights movement through the 20th century and touches on athletes like Jack Johnson, Jackie Robinson, and Muhammad Ali. Students can use the collection independently to learn about this subject and complete the timeline worksheet included at the end.

Students will be asked to generalize about the civil rights movement during different time periods in American history, noting the shifts in focus, strategies, and success. In addition, they will draw parallels between events in sports history and the civil rights movement.
Kate Harris
18
 

What do Anthropologists Do?

There are a number of lesson plans devoted to anthropology available from the Smithsonian. This collection links to several of the best lessons and teaching resources and, where necessary, provides short summaries of what each are, so teachers can easily use them in their own classrooms.

It is focused on lessons and resources appropriate for middle and high school classrooms. The last four resources reference the case of Ishi, originally described as "the last Yahi Indian," and an example of flaws in the early approach to anthropology. The Smithsonian housed his brain, which had been donated to science by the University of California, from 1917 to 2000, when it was repatriated to his tribe.
Kate Harris
18
 

Archaeology Lessons

This collection includes lesson plans and artifact collections that would be useful for any K-12 study of archaeology. Brief descriptions of the resources are included where necessary, so that teachers can quickly determine what might be applicable to their own classrooms.
Kate Harris
14
 

Florence Merriam Bailey

Florence Augusta Merriam Bailey (August 8, 1863 – September 22, 1948) was an American ornithologist and nature writer. She was very influential in the conservation of birds and an entertaining writer. One of my favourite naturalists, along with her husband Vernon Orlando Bailey and her brother C. Hart Merriam.
Siobhan Leachman
15
 

Tools of the Labor Movement

The United States labor movement began in full force during the late 19th century and peaked during World War II. Workers learned that by joining together in unions, they could exert more pressure on employers and the government to protect their rights and improve labor conditions. This collection includes a variety of resources related to the United States labor movement, particularly the various tools and strategies used to create change.

Guiding questions to consider are:
-What rights do workers desire?
-How can labor unions influence employers, government, and the public?
-What tools and strategies are most effective for improving working conditions? Consider: boycotts, picketing, appeals to the media, strikes, walk-outs, and slow-downs.
-How does the public perceive labor unions? How does this impact their results?
-Are women and minorities included in the labor movement? Were they always?
Kate Harris
25
 

U.S. Presidential Inauguration Resources

This teaching collection includes resources, such as video interviews with expert historians, artworks, memorabilia and photographs of the American tradition of presidential inaugurations, including the Oath of Office, the Inaugural Address, the Inauguration Parade and the Inaugural Ball.

Discussion Questions:
-How does a U.S. presidential inauguration compare to a royal coronation?
-How are these events populist (for ordinary citizens)? How are they elitist (for the high class elite)?
-Where can inauguration traditions be traced?
-What is required by the Constitution to occur at a presidential inauguration?
-What events have become a tradition over time?
-What objects help tell the story of inaugurations over time?
Ashley Naranjo
36
 

Was Reconstruction a Failure?

The period after the Civil War, known as Reconstruction, had lofty goals for reuniting the nation and preserving the new rights given to African-Americans. For a time, these goals were achieved and three important amendments were made to the Constitution. However, by 1876 Reconstruction was considered over and much of the progress that had been made was undone. This collection of detailed prints and cartoons highlight many different aspects of Reconstruction and asks students to consider the overall result of Reconstruction. Students can analyze each one using the embedded questions.
Kate Harris
8
 

Remembering the Holocaust

This collection looks at the way artists have used art, literature, and architecture to memorialize the victims of the Holocaust and explores the questions around how an artistic work, memorial, or museum can try to convey an understanding of genocide.

Questions to keep in mind as you observe each work:
1) What is the purpose of this memorial? Is it to honor, remember, educate others, or something else?
2) On what aspect of the Holocaust does this memorial focus?
3) What Jewish symbols are present? What national symbols are present? Are there human figures? Is it abstract? What other features do you notice about this memorial?
4) What is the setting of this memorial? How does that affect its purpose and design?
Kate Harris
24
 

Garfield, Medicine and Germ Theory in the US

A collection to be paired with Destiny of the Republic. A book about the presidency/assassination of Garfield and the doctors who failed to save him.
Sara Benis
6
5017-5040 of 5,233 Collections