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Found 543 Collections

 

Plastic Pollution & Coral Reefs: A Calamity of Global Proportions

This collection was designed to provide students with an independent learning experience on the relationship between coral reefs and plastic pollution.  Students are presented with the following challenge: 

"You are part of a team that is trying to protect corals from plastic pollution. Billions of plastic items are trapped in coral reefs, and experts predict that number will increase by 40 percent by 2025. It is your goal to identify solutions to this global problem."

Students will use Project Zero Thinking Routines to examine various sources before they create a research-based proposal that addresses solutions to this issue.

Global Competency Connection:

  • Students will “investigate the world” as they explore the importance of coral reefs and the threat of plastics.   
  • This project will allow students to “communicate their ideas” in writing as they design a proposal to "take action" on these issues of global significance. 

Using the Collection

A detailed description of learning activities can be found by clicking the information icon on each resource.  Additionally, notes regarding the use of each Project Zero Thinking Routine are documented as annotations within each individual Thinking Routine tile and provide specific instructions on how align these routines with this collection. 

A handout that students can use to document their thinking can be found here. Note: This handout contains questions specific to Washington, DC, but can be modified to suit any location. 

#ProjectZero #EnvironmentalScience

Aleah Myers
11
 

Easy PZ: Looking: Ten Times Two (Mary Lord's Civil War Autograph Quilt)

Each Easy PZ collection includes an artwork or museum object and a recorded webinar demonstrating how to use it to develop students' skills with a Harvard Project Zero thinking routine. Supplementary resources provide context relevant to understanding the featured artwork or object.

This collection models the routine "Looking Ten Times Two" with an object from the National Museum of American History. #visiblethinking

Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access
19
 

Exploring Art with Quilts at the Anacostia Community Museum

This collection of quilts offers material to challenge conventional definitions of art and artists, explore the many different ways to tell a visual story and spark discussions about the traditions that are passed down in families. This resource is structured around 2 hour-long lessons in art analysis, a creative task and a reflection session.

A range of styles and traditions are represented here, as each quilt and quilter has their own story to tell. The story can be evident in the visual content of the quilt, but the context in which it was created can be equally important. Quilting is an art form taught between generations and amongst friends, bridging the gap between material culture and intangible heritage.

By encouraging young learners to look closely and develop evidence-based arguments, we can hope to build their skills to think deeply about the interrelationship of art, memory and community.

Enclosed in the Teacher's Resource is a list of quilts, short biographies of the artists and potential discussion questions. Also included are suggested art and craft activities, and an annotated bibliography for educators who want to do more research on the topic.

Goals:

  • How can we express things that are important to us?
  • How can quilts teach us about community?

Objectives:

  • Challenge and expand definitions of “art” and “artist.”
  • Develop a toolkit for visual analysis.
  • Understand different forms of creative self-expression.
  • Learn about traditions we share in our communities and pass between generations.
  • Empower students’ creativity.
Celine Romano
14
 

Design It Yourself: Design a Poster

Follow along to use elements such as color, line, and composition to design a poster. 

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
24
 

The Artist in the American Landscape

Built or natural, densely populated or sparsely inhabited, the landscape around us always affects us. Artists across the world and throughout all periods of human history have represented or incorporated landscape.

This collection uses artworks from the collection of The Rockwell Museum, a Smithsonian Affiliate museum located in Corning, NY. American art is particularly defined by landscapes since the lands America comprises are unique and diverse. In this collection we demonstrate how landscape permeates art by indigenous Americans, Hudson River School artists and contemporary artists. Explore this collection to learn how these varied representations of landscapes compare and contrast. There may be more similarities across different periods of history than you might have imagined. 

TheRockwellMuseum
19
 

Easy PZ: See, Wonder, Connect (Theme: Sports Heroes)

Each Easy PZ collection includes an artwork or museum object and a recorded webinar demonstrating how to use it to develop students' skills with a Harvard Project Zero thinking routine. Supplementary resources provide context relevant to understanding the featured artwork or object.

This collection models the routine "See Wonder Connect" with a group of museum resources from the National Museum of American History and the National Portrait Gallery. #visiblethinking

Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access
16
 

Easy PZ: See, Wonder, Connect (Theme: Conservation and Human Impact on the Environment)

Each Easy PZ collection includes an artwork or museum object and a recorded webinar demonstrating how to use it to develop students' skills with a Harvard Project Zero thinking routine. Supplementary resources provide context relevant to understanding the featured artwork or object.

This collection models the routine "See Wonder Connect" with a group of museum resources from the Smithsonian American Art Museum, National Museum of American History and the National Postal Museum. #visiblethinking #earthoptimism

Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access
15
 

Immigrant Literature

art used for 12th grade literature class

Katie Belanger
3
 

Life in DC: Then and Now

Explore images of Washington, DC, using artworks in the Smithsonian American Art Museum. Compare them to the present, learning about changing neighborhoods, people and daily life, natural resources, and arts & culture. This collection can be adapted for students of different grade levels learning about DC history.

Phoebe Hillemann
38
 

Learning Lab Training Collection on the Theme: “Humans and the Footprints We Leave: Climate Change and Other Critical Challenges"

This collection is designed to help educators bridge the classroom experience to a museum visit. It is intended to demonstrate various ways to use the Learning Lab and its tools, while offering specific, replicable, pre-engagement activities that can simply be copied to a new collection and used to help students engage with museum resources. 

Included here: 

  • Section 1: a set of flashcards, a template document so that teachers can create and print their own specific sets, and strategies for their use in their classrooms. 
  • Section 2: a variety of student activities and resources to explore artist Luis Cruz Azaceta's "Shifting States: Iraq," a metaphorical representation of the unrest taking place in Iraq, and more broadly, an exploration of the human condition during times of crisis.  This section includes an image of the work from the Smithsonian American Art Museum, an explanatory video with curator E. Carmen Ramos, two  Thinking Routines - "See, Think, Wonder" and "The 3 Y's" - from Harvard's Project Zero Visible Thinking and Global Thinking materials, and  an array of prompts and Learning Lab tools to help students think critically and globally.  
  • Section 3: a short assignment to get participants started using the Learning Lab.
  • Section 4: spacer tile template to serve as chapter headings in longer collections.

This collection is adapted from a teaching collection on the same theme (Luis Cruz Azaceta's "Shifting States: Iraq" ( http://learninglab.si.edu/q/ll...), that includes extension activities. It was created for the 2019 cohort of the Smithsonian-Montgomery College Faculty Fellowship Program on the theme, "The Search for American Identity: Building a Nation Together," and then adapted for the 2020 program on the theme, “Humans and the Footprints We Leave: Climate Change and Other Critical Challenges". 

Keywords: #MCteach


Philippa Rappoport
43
 

Code of Hammurabi

This is about Hammurabi and his greatest contribution. #Babylonia #TeachingInquiry

Rio Castañares Jr.
4
 

Easy PZ: Zoom In and Design Hunt

Each Easy PZ collection includes an artwork or museum object and a recorded webinar demonstrating how to use it to develop students' skills with a Harvard Project Zero thinking routine. Supplementary resources provide context relevant to understanding the featured artwork or object.

This collection models the routine "Zoom In,"  alongside a "Design Hunt" with a museum resource from the National Museum of American History. #visiblethinking

Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access
20
 

How Do Real Historical Resources Help Us Understand Fictional Characters? To Kill a Mockingbird

To explore this "essential question," the resources here offer different contexts for the novel To Kill a Mockingbird. They can help visualize and comprehend the setting of the book and the social issues of the Depression era in the South. With that understanding, students may better apprehend the choices and values of the characters in the novel.

Supporting question: "What was it like to live in small-town Alabama during that time?"

To Kill a Mockingbird is set in the ficticious Maycomb, Alabama, which author Harper Lee modeled on her hometown of Monroeville, Alabama. Students may approach the images from the time period and place of the story (1930s) to consider how race and social class make a difference in how one answers that question.

Supporting question: "What important matters were in the news during that time?"

It's not a fact that Harper Lee based the trial in the novel on the Scottsboro boys, but it may have influenced her. Have students look for similarities and differences. What other events were going on? (e.g., Great Depression).

Have students explain how these resources help understand the characters in the novel.

Brenda Sandbulte
14
 

Easy PZ: Zoom In and Voice and Choice

Each Easy PZ collection includes an artwork or museum object and a recorded webinar demonstrating how to use it to develop students' skills with a Harvard Project Zero thinking routine. Supplementary resources provide context relevant to understanding the featured artwork or object.

This collection models the routine "Zoom In ,"  alongside "Voice and Choice" with a museum resource from the Smithsonian American Art Museum. #visiblethinking

Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access
23
 

Flashcard Activity: Tools and Innovation

This collection traces innovation in various types of tools over time.  Approach in small groups or as a classroom to have students explore the essential questions: What makes something innovative?  How do you define innovation? 

Supporting questions and activity implementation ideas are located under this collection's Information (i) button.  This activity works equally well online or using printed flashcards (see the resource tile). 

Keywords: invention, flash cards, conceptual understanding

Tess Porter
37
 

Explore: Mask Design

In this collection, explore the history, evolution, and meaning of masks through multiple perspectives. Harvard Project Zero Thinking Routines are included at the end to help guide discussion and reflection of design choices, local and global impact, and ways that masks protect and conceal the wearer. 

Suggested instructions for use: This collection was designed to be modular and a survey of the masks available at the Smithsonian. Each section begins with an essential question, followed by several masks that help explore the key concept. Teachers may facilitate Project Zero Thinking Routines before and/or after students look closely at each section. Students may want to jot down notes in response to the essential question in preparation for a group discussion.

Additional questions to guide investigation:

  • How does belief shape our response to worldly concerns?
  • How does the body's needs and shape dictate the designs we create?
  • How does new knowledge change our decisions? What "old" knowledge gets carried forward and why?
  • Where are we vulnerable in our bodies?

This collection was created in collaboration by:

To read more about the research process the team used in creating this collection, please visit the supplementary Smithsonian Learning Lab blog post.

Keywords: cfch, chsdm, nmah, saam, sclda, ppe, face covering, protection, design, making, community, fashion, production, identity, inquiry, art, culture, medicine, science

Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access
74
 

Introducing Hokusai: Mad about Painting

This Learning Lab Collection introduces three themes from the Hokusai:  Mad about Painting exhibition and provides works of art, classroom activities, and discussion questions associated with each theme. 

Tags:  #AsiaTeachers; Be a Reporter; customs; daily life; dragons; Edo; Great Wave; Hokusai; Japan; nature; New Year; personification; poetry; power; Project Zero; Mount Fuji; See Think Wonder; Step Inside; symbols; thunder; woodblock print

About the exhibition:

Hokusai:  Mad about Painting
November 23, 2019–November 8, 2020
Freer Gallery of Art, galleries 5–8

The Japanese artist Katsushika Hokusai (1760–1849) is widely recognized for a single image—Great Wave Off the Coast of Kanagawa, an icon of global art—yet he produced thousands of works throughout his long life. Charles Lang Freer recognized the artist’s vast abilities before many other collectors, and he assembled the world’s largest collection of paintings, sketches, and drawings by Hokusai. In commemoration of the centennial of Freer’s death in 1919, and in celebration of the Summer Olympics in Tokyo in 2020, the Freer Gallery presents a yearlong exploration of the prolific career of Katsushika Hokusai. Works large and small are on view, from six-panel folding screens and hanging scrolls to paintings and drawings. Also included are rare hanshita-e, drawings for woodblock prints that were adhered to the wood and frequently destroyed in the process of carving the block prior to printing. Among the many featured works are Hokusai’s manga, his often-humorous renderings of everyday life in Japan. Together, these works reveal an artistic genius who thought he might finally achieve true mastery in painting—if he lived to the age of 110.


Freer and Sackler Galleries
25
 

The Impact of the Civil War on Society

Students will explore these sources to spark inquiry and investigation about how the Civil War impacted American society. 

  • Students can complete the sorting activity to categorize the images. 
  • Students should select one source they find most intriguing and generate questions  about the source and its related topic by completing the quiz question. 
Tiferet Ani
30
 

Easy PZ: "See, Think, Wonder" and "Think, Feel, Care"

Each Easy PZ collection includes an artwork or museum object and a recorded webinar demonstrating how to use it to develop students' skills with a Harvard Project Zero thinking routine. Supplementary resources provide context relevant to understanding the featured artwork or object.

This collection models the routines "See / Think / Wonder" with "Think, Feel, Care" alongside children's stories and museum resources from the Smithsonian. #visiblethinking 

Tags: Three Billy Goats Gruff, troll, bridge, reading

Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access
31
 

Design it Yourself: Design a Prototype for a User

Learn to think like a designer by prototyping a solution engineered for a specific user. 

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
23
 

Design It Yourself: Design an Expressive Letterform

Follow along to design an expressive letterform inspired by 2017 National Design Award Winner for Communication Design, Jennifer Morla

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
20
 

Follow that Bird! A Science and Technology Unit on Tracking Birds

Welcome to Follow That Bird! A Science and Technology Unit on Tracking Birds. The goal of this inquiry-based unit is to teach core middle-school science concepts through student exploration of the tools used by Smithsonian scientists to track birds, the data they collect and how new information is used for conservation.

Smithsonian's National Zoo and Conservation Biology Institute
45
 

Easy PZ: Building a Culture of Thinking in the Classroom

Each Easy PZ collection includes an artwork or museum object and a recorded webinar demonstrating how to use it to develop students' skills with a Harvard Project Zero thinking routine. Supplementary resources provide context relevant to understanding the featured artwork or object.

This collection includes reflections from a teacher and an instructional coach on how (and why) to facilitate Project Zero Thinking Routines that encourage learners to engage in the type of thinking or core understanding you are targeting.

Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access
20
 

Teaching Critical Thinking through Art with the National Gallery of Art

The resources in this collection are pulled directly from the National Gallery of Art’s online course Teaching Critical Thinking through Art. Based on the popular Art Around the Corner professional development program for teachers in Washington, D.C., this five-unit online course provides everything you need to begin creating a culture of critical thinking and collaboration for any classroom, subject, or level. You do not need an art background or museum access to successfully integrate the course materials into your teaching. Your willingness to experiment with new teaching practices is all that is required.

Find demonstrations, lesson plans, and videos here on the edX platform! Now in English, Español, Français, and 简体中文

National Gallery of Art
21
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