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Found 6,931 Collections

 

The American spirit

Anne Ruka
2
 

Highlights Collection: Astronomy Learning Resources

This is a Smithsonian Learning Lab topical collection, which contains images, text, and other multimedia resources that may complement the Tween Tribune feature, Barns are painted red because of the physics of dying stars. Use these resources to introduce or augment your study of this topic. If you want to personalize this collection by changing or adding content, click the Sign Up link above to create a free account.  If you are already logged in, click the copy button to initiate your own version. Learn more here


Ashley Naranjo
30
 

​Nasal Cavity

Nasal cavity have a number of structures. The superior middle and inferior nasal conchae is this coronal section through the nasal cavity where that line down the middle is showing the nasal septum and then that's right down the middle and it separates our two parts of the nasal cavity.

Each nasal cavity has the following components a superior nasal conchae, middle nasal conchae and inferior nasal conchae called turbinate bones and they come out from the lateral nasal wall and underneath each of them they have these spaces called the superior meatus middle meatus and inferior meatus and these bring air into the nasal cavity. This air swirled and touches the mucosal lining the air is warmed up the air is filtered the airs add some humidity to it so doesn't dry out the nasal mucosa.

There's the medial wall of the nasal septum and there's the lateral wall of the nasal cavity and on the lateral wall is a superior nasal Concha a middle nasal Concha and an inferior nasal Concha. Just as we can see the coronal section now coming into the nasal cavity is cranial nerve and the olfactory nerve is for smell. And so there we've got these different branches coming to the nasal septum in the lateral nasal wall and in the sagittal section there we've got the olfactory bulb and tract and then they send there through the cribriform frame and of the ethmoid bone there we've got those olfactory nerves coming in.

The maxillary nerve does general sensation to the nasal cavity pain, temperature, touch, vibration and so forth and so there we've got cranial nerve each and it sends off branches that will go to the nasal septum branches that go to the lateral nasal wall and then even branches that go down to the hard palate to do general sensation which do the hard palate and part of the gums the buck so the lingual surface of the gums for general sensation alright now in this sagittal section here we see super middle and inferior nasal Concha. And then here we've got the opening for the sphenoid sinus and then here we have the opening for the maxillary sinus and you just need to know that a died rain those paranasal sinuses and then finally the nasolacrimal duct empties into the nasal cavity in the inferior meatus.

First here we've got the nasal cavity in the opening nasolacrimal duct so there's our lacrimal gland that under innervation of facial nerve. The greater petrosal branch causes you to cry number seven makes you cry close your eye innervates every gland in the head except when it goes through. Here's seven innervating the lacrimal gland tears then go down in the eye and they wash through the eye and and help keep the eye moist and then excess tears go into these canaliculi that drain into the lacrimal sac and drain down this nasolacrimal duct and end tear into the nasal cavity.

Hollow chamber within the frontal bone and then the ethmoid sinus also called ethmoid air cells because there's anterior middle and posterior to your chambers of these honeycomb looking sinusesin the ethmoid bone and then the maxillary sinus that flanks the nasal cavities below the orbit above the maxillary teeth and then the sphenoid sinus.

There is a key that shows a nasal cavity maxillary ethmoid frontal and sphenoid sinuses. All right now the nasal cavity Musil pharynx has the opening of the auditory tube also known as your eustachian tube. In this sagittal section there's the opening of the fringotympanic tube or your auditory tube and it's called the fringotympanic tube. The nasal pharynx in this coronal section which then goes into this tube that goes into the middle ear hence it's also called the auditory tube because it goes from the nasal pharynx into the middle ear where auditory area occurs and the new station and then eustachian tube for the scientists who discovered.

Michelle Allan
2
 

Inventing Scotland

What makes something Scottish and who decides this? Using the Smithsonian archives this collection features a range of objects and images, some traditionally Scottish and some less so, and asks students to consider how we represent countries and what problems that can present. See 'Information' button for lesson plans.

Amy Johnstone
35
 

Using Portraiture to Teach the Struggle for Justice

This collection supports the January 2017 Google Hangout facilitated by the National Portrait Gallery in coordination with the Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access.

#NPGteach

Briana White
22
 

Learning to Look with the National Portrait Gallery

Integrating portraiture into the classroom provides exciting opportunities to connect students with history, biography, visual art, and many other subjects. The National Portrait Gallery collection presents the wonderful diversity of individuals who have left—and are leaving—their mark on our country and our culture. The museum portrays poets and presidents, visionaries and villains, actors and activists whose lives tell the American story. Be introduced to "learning to look" strategies in this collection—unique ways to hook and engage students when looking closely at portraits.

This collection was created to support the 2016 CCSSO Teachers of the Year Day at the Smithsonian.
Briana White
44
 

Puzzle Looking Strategy: Learning to Look with the National Portrait Gallery

In this collection, we look at portraiture through the lens of the puzzle activity. This looking strategy allows participants to start with a small puzzle piece of a portrait to consider the details before looking at the whole object. This activity challenges participants to determine what they think they know and what they wonder about a portrait based on verbal descriptions of the puzzle pieces.

Visually rich portraits, with both objects and setting, are most effective when using this strategy.

Included in this collection are examples of portraits National Portrait Gallery educators have had success with when faciltiating the puzzle activity while teaching in the galleries: George Washington, Men of Progress, Shimomura Crossing the Delaware
Briana White
10
 

Jumping In Looking Strategy: Learning to Look with the National Portrait Gallery

In this collection, we look at portraiture through the lens of the jumping in looking strategy. This looking strategy allows participants a more sensory experience with the portrait.

Visually rich portraits, with both objects and setting, are most effective when using this strategy.

Included in this collection are examples of portraits National Portrait Gallery educators have had success with when facilitating the jumping in looking strategy while teaching in the galleries: George Washington Carver, Alice Waters, E.O. Wilson, George Washington, Men of Progress, Shimomura Crossing the Delaware, and Tony Hawk
Briana White
13
 

30 Second Look Strategy: Learning to Look with the National Portrait Gallery

In this collection, we look at portraiture through the lens of the 30 second look strategy. This looking strategy allows participants 30 seconds to look at a portrait, and then turn away from the portrait and have a conversation about what they saw. This activity challenges participants to first look on their own and then have a collaborative conversation with their peers.

Visually rich portraits, with both objects and setting, are most effective when using this strategy.

Included in this collection are examples of portraits National Portrait Gallery educators have had success with when faciltiating the 30 second look while teaching in the galleries: George Washington, Men of Progress, Shimomura Crossing the Delaware
Briana White
10
 

American Revolution

#TeachingInquiry

Sarah Rafalowitz
6
 

Walt Whitman Poetry and Art

SAAMteach - High School Level English classes

Lesson concept is included in resources

Anne Ruka
7
 

Samuel Langley, Solar Scientist

Samuel Langley was the director of the Allegheny Observatory very near the city of Pittsburgh. Langley focused his telescope on the sun each clear day hoping to find its secrets and energy output.

Arthur Glaser
21
 

Conflict and Compromise in the Origins of the U.S. Constitution

A collection of EDSITEment and Smithsonian resources for understanding how conflict and compromise led to the drafting of the  U.S. Constitution, ratification and the  Bill of Rights.

#NHD2018

Joe Phelan
21
 

American Whaling Industry

In the early nineteenth century, America demanded a clean burning fuel that would supplant the candle as the primary tool for lighting in homes and businesses. Whale oil proved to be the answer. It was clean burning, odorless and more economical than candles. Hunting whales was adventurous and dangerous and it lured many young men to a life at sea. Whaling remained an important industry through the Civil War and began to decline with the discovery of oil and its by products at Drake's well and other sites in Western Pennsylvania.

Arthur Glaser
30
 

Albert Bierstadt and the Lure of the West

Easterners heard many stories about the dangers of traveling to the American west. Accounts of the great American desert as an almost impossible place to cross caused many to rethink leaving home. Albert Bierstadt and painters of the Hudson River School traveled the west and sent back their impressions of the landscape and wildlife.

Arthur Glaser
13
 

Chad's Aerospace Collection

Starting off with X-15: Rocket powered airplane
Chad Yomogida
7
 

Dinosaur Findings

Amazing findings by scientists!

Alejandra Pulido
2
 

George Catlin: Indian Portraiture

During the 1830s, George Catlin and his team produced over five hundred images of native American life on the western plains. Nearly half of his work consisted of exquisite portraits of Indians of many different tribes. Some tribes like the Hidatsa disappeared before any other visual representation of them could be made.

Arthur Glaser
25
 

George Catlin: Lives of the Plains Indians

Long before the camera went west, artists like George Catlin were preserving the images of the native Americans on the western plains. Catlin's paintings are numerous and divide into two genre: the group activities and portraiture. This learning lab focuses on group activities of many plains indians including hunting, traditional dances, and recreation.

Arthur Glaser
32
 

American stereotype: All Black Pilgrim Attire

Every year near Thanksgiving, images of our Pilgrims father begin to proliferate showing them as very austere and wearing only black clothing. This learning lab introduces images of Pilgrims that are compared with written primary sources. It was customary in the 17th century to inventory all the belongings of the deceased before they were distributed to the heirs. These inventories and the wills themselves provide detailed information about the attire of everyday Pilgrims of this period.

Arthur Glaser
21
 

Jamestown: Challenge for Survival

The early years in Virginia's first colony were fraught with starvation and illness. Many of the Jamestown colonists were not "survivors". Most were gentlemen searching for gold and riches and had no experience living in the wilderness. America was a challenge: the forest primeval had never been cut, there was no available farmland, few had experience at fishing or hunting and gathering. Our story about tells about the ultimate in desperation.

Arthur Glaser
31
 

Edward Hicks early American Folk Artist

Edward Hicks' paintings reflect the same quality and style. More advanced in technique than Grandma Moses but still simple if compared to the work of the Hudson Valley School.

Arthur Glaser
24
 

Coil Baskets

Baskets can be both functional and decorative. Choose an image and make guesses based on what you see:

  • What materials were used to make the basket?
  • What do you think it was used for?
  • What process did the artist use to make the basket?
  • Where do you think the basket is from?

Check the info tab to learn more.

Jean-Marie Galing
18
4801-4824 of 6,931 Collections