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Found 5,422 Collections

 

Today's Modern Latino Art

Street smart and brash with a fresh approach! This collection has freedom to express yourself all within the confines of our present society.

Renee Mills
7
 

Tomorrow's Forecast: Oceans and Weather (1995)

This 1995 issue of Art to Zoo includes printable maps and classroom/take-home activities. Students learn how ocean currents influence weather patterns and climate. They conduct an experiment on the differing heat capacities of water and air, and find and label port cities around the globe. Below are some of the port cities represented in artworks from Smithsonian galleries.

Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access
8
 

Tony Seruga Nightstand collection

This is a collection based on Burtons Morris's nightstand collection, i have included images that represent who i am.
Tony Seruga
7
 

Tooker's "The Waiting Room" As a Window Into Theme and Tone

Students will begin by examining Tooker's "The Waiting Room" using the "See/Think/Wonder" methodology. Then, they will examine five poems and argue (using evidence from their chosen poem as well as the painting) which poem is closest in tone and theme to the painting. I've included additional images to further the discussion.

cf.porter
9
 

Tool Kit

This collection is for use in my Humanities 1 course to give students a "Tool Kit" for "reading" artistic texts.
Michelle O'Brien
5
 

Tools Associated With Middle Class Work During Colonial Times

The purpose of this collection is to give you an idea of what life was like during colonial times in America for working members of the middle class by looking at the tools which they used to do their jobs. Members of the middle class during this time were mainly farmers due to the fact that agriculture played a vital role in sustaining the economy prior to industry. However, farmers are not the only profession which make up the middle class, which also includes craftsmen such as watchmakers and blacksmiths (lumenlearning.com).  

My collection begins by touching on one of the most essential professions during this time period as we look at one of the most important tools used by colonial farmers, whose products made up the vast majority of the colonial economy. The Hoe plow was probably the most important tool farmers used as it allowed them to keep their crops weed free and it was also used to prepare the soil upon which the plants would grow (History.org). Additionally, we can also see a gardening saw from the colonial era which was used by farmers at the time to pull weeds and move soil around or to dig small holes (Emuseum.history.org). As we move forward in our collection we can see some of the tools which blacksmiths used. Blacksmiths were a very important part of society during colonial times as blacksmiths were responsible for building many of the tools necessary to succeed in other trades such as nails, and cowbells as well as household items such as pots and pans. To do so blacksmiths used a wide variety of tools including sledgehammers (Typically made of steel and weighed up to 12 pounds), tongs and an anvil, all of which are pictured in the collection (History.org). As we look further into the collection we can see a wide variety of tools which would have been used by many middle class professions, such as a branding iron, which was used to mark one's ownership of something, and a colonial storage jar (Emuseum.history.org). Additionally, we can also see a set of money scales and weights. This was an important tool for working members of the middle class as it provided a way to determine the value of money, something which is important if you have to buy and sell goods as part of your profession (Emuseum.history.org).


Nathaniel Bigelow
10
 

Tools for Meditation

Are you interested in meditation? This topical collection includes a variety of tools for meditation, including mandalas, music, prayer beads, labyrinths, and a video of a guided meditation and pranayama (breathing) practice. Web links to additional background information are embedded throughout.
Kate Harris
16
 

Tools For Work in Early America

At first, the colonies relied on imported goods to meet consumer needs. Without any real capital to create their own goods, America was at the mercy of import taxes in order to meet their needs. However, in the mid to late 18th century, we start to see America taking matters into their own hands. With the rising market for American goods and services, manufacturers would need the capital to meet these demands.


This collection explores the tools that you might find in early American places of work. Each tool served its respective industry without replacement, helping to create a legitimate sector of industry. While some may seem mundane by today's standards, each tool was irreplaceable in its function. These tools made the jobs of American workers significantly easier, creating an economic incentive to produce and consume American goods.

After the American Revolution, it was more important than ever that America have the tools to create supply that is sufficient to meet the demands of American consumers. The new political freedom that came with independence also require economic freedom. American manufacturers needed the latest technology in order to maintain this level of independence. The tools found here helped boost production, making an independent marketplace more viable and lucrative.

Nathan Neal
10
 

Tools of the Labor Movement

The United States labor movement began in full force during the late 19th century and peaked during World War II. Workers learned that by joining together in unions, they could exert more pressure on employers and the government to protect their rights and improve labor conditions. This collection includes a variety of resources related to the United States labor movement, particularly the various tools and strategies used to create change.

Guiding questions to consider are:
-What rights do workers desire?
-How can labor unions influence employers, government, and the public?
-What tools and strategies are most effective for improving working conditions? Consider: boycotts, picketing, appeals to the media, strikes, walk-outs, and slow-downs.
-How does the public perceive labor unions? How does this impact their results?
-Are women and minorities included in the labor movement? Were they always?
Julie Kuzy
25
 

Tools of the Labor Movement

The United States labor movement began in full force during the late 19th century and peaked during World War II. Workers learned that by joining together in unions, they could exert more pressure on employers and the government to protect their rights and improve labor conditions. This collection includes a variety of resources related to the United States labor movement, particularly the various tools and strategies used to create change.

Guiding questions to consider are:
-What rights do workers desire?
-How can labor unions influence employers, government, and the public?
-What tools and strategies are most effective for improving working conditions? Consider: boycotts, picketing, appeals to the media, strikes, walk-outs, and slow-downs.
-How does the public perceive labor unions? How does this impact their results?
-Are women and minorities included in the labor movement? Were they always?
Kate Harris
25
 

Topology: An Introduction

Geometry, geology, and geography are words that are easily confused. More confusing still, those fields
of study share a word that means two very different things, depending on the field. The word is topology.  
To a geographer or geologist, topology has to do with the planet's surface and its changeable forms. To a
geometrician, topology has to do with the constant properties of forms—properties that never change.

To continue, click here. If you are an educator, click READ MORE below.


Stephen Binns
3
 

Toys

Now in 21 century, we have lots of entertainments such as  computers, cell phones, gaming consoles and other electronic devices .  We have so many different kind of games or toys to play, I wonder what kind of entertainments did people have before 1865, what kind of toys did children play in their age, i also have lots of interest on what toys look like before 1865, how good is the technique in that age. I will list my collection of many different kind of toys before 1865 and i will arrange them with their shape, type and color.

Tiancheng Wang
8
 

Toys

Now in 21 century, we have lots of entertainments such as  computers, cell phones, gaming consoles and other electronic devices .  We have so many different kind of games or toys to play, I wonder what kind of entertainments did people have before 1865, what kind of toys did children play in their age, i also have lots of interest on what toys look like before 1865, how good is the technique in that age. I will list my collection of many different kind of toys before 1865 and i will arrange them with their shape, type and color.

Tiancheng Wang
8
 

Toys and Games Before 1865

This is a showcase of the various different types of toys and games that were enjoyed before 1865. 

Tiffany Ngoulou
10
 

Toys and Games Children Played with During and After the Colonial Period

This collection includes toys and games from the colonial period and after. Like most items created during this time frame, these toys and games were usually handmade out of easily accessible items like wood, cotton, and paper. This collection includes a variety of toys such as two dolls, checkers and dominoes, a rattle ball, a board game, jackstraw, a carousel, playing cards, and a shuttlecock used during the game of Badminton. Each one of these items symbolized how products from this time period were individualistic and could be made right at home. 

Joycelynn Thomas
10
 

toys in 1860

        In the 1860's toys where not as big and showy as they are now. they where very light hearted and simple but would still entertain the kids who had fun playing with them. Toys like the rocking horse were very simple in design providing only one thing which was to rock back and forth. The toy ark on the following picture is simple in design as well since it really doesn't do anything however it seemed to be a good way to educate kids back then about Noah's ark which is a fundamental Bible story. simple small rolling toys like the train seem simple now a days but where very popular amongst boys back in the 1860's.  

        The crank carousel is not to weird as there are many modern counterparts but basically it is really used by just cranking the lever until it starts moving around and maybe making some music which was really a basic form of amusement for kids in the 19th century.  The cat toy was a simple wooden toy that seem to have something in between it that made a sound when pushed. The Cradle seemed to be made for dolls since its unlikely to be made for an actual baby. The Dog toy seemed to be made and work the same way as the cat toy did. 

       The doll was a main toy little girls played with and seemed to be made out of wood all around with a simple dress as a cover. The Doll that follows the first doll seem to be a more elegant doll that was most likely reserved for wealthier families with little girls. The Duck toy worked and was made in the same way as the cat and dog toys were where you pressed on it and made a noise. The farm set was basically just a set of farm animals with a farm house included it like a lego set but with out the building aspect it was more of a toy for the imagination. 


Miguel Ramon
10
 

Tradition

adam rubert
1
 

Trail of Tears

What was the Trail of Tears? What incidents led to the Trail of Tears? Who was removed from their native land? Where did they resettle? What was President Andrew Jackson's opinion on Indian removal? What was John Ross's opinion on Indian removal? What is your opinion on the event?

This Collection was created to be used as an introduction to the "Trail of Tears" event that occurred during the period of Westward Expansion. This Collection contains images of then President Andrew Jackson, John Ross, Chief of the Cherokee nation, and General Winfield Scott. It also includes Jackson's message to Congress, "On Indian Removal", the Treaty of New Echota along with a letter that Chief Ross wrote to the U.S. Congress denouncing the Treaty of New Echota which the government used as legal authority to remove the Cherokee from their native land.

Background Information:
In 1838 and 1839, President Andrew Jackson ordered the relocation of the Cherokee people from their native lands east of the Mississippi River to an area in what is known as present-day Oklahoma.
The Cherokee people called this forced migration the, "Trail of Tears" because of its devastating effects. The Cherokee people suffered hunger, disease, and exhaustion during their journey, resulting in 4,000 deaths out of the 15,000 Cherokees who were forced to relocate.

Source citation: "Trail of Tears." Africans in America. PBS Online. nd. Web. 7 Jan 2016.
Linda Muller
11
 

Trains and Railroads: From Wooden Track to Amtrak

This 1984 issue of From Art to Zoo suggests ways of introducing the subject of trains and railroads in a social studies unit on westward expansion. Included is a pull-out page titled "Write a Story!" To get a taste of the idea: Do the three objects below suggest any certain kind of railroad story?

Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access
5
 

Transcendentalism and National Parks

These visuals and supplementary materials are meant to augment a much larger American Literature unit (for grade 11) that covers Transcendentalism and authors such as Ralph Waldo Emerson, Henry David Thoreau, John Muir, and Frederick Law Olmsted.  This unit usually takes seven (7) 55-minute class periods.  I also utilize the first episode of Ken Burns's National Parks:  America's Best Idea.  

#SAAMteach

Cara Lane
6
 

Transcontinental Railroad: the 19th Century "Network" of the Future

In 1862, the Pacific Railroad Act chartered the Central Pacific and the Union Pacific Railroad Companies, and tasked them with building a transcontinental railroad that would link the United States from East to West. Over the next seven years, the two companies would race toward each other starting from Sacramento, California in the West and Omaha, Nebraska to the East, both teams struggled to overcome  great engineering obstacles and physical risks to their workforce before the two lines were joined at Promontory, Utah, on May 10, 1869. This "network" connecting our nation and  continent, was a huge technological step forward for our country that incited many other technologies and industries.

Jodi Halligan M.Ed
13
 

Transitional Justice around the World

Images and symbols of countries that can be considered subjects for the study of transitional justice. Transitional justice relates to justice methods used to approach societies scarred by major human rights violations.

Danny Rivas
6
 

Transportation: Unstacked

UNSTACKED is a wonderful way to spark inquiry, analysis, and discussion. By visually exploring our images, you can bring the Smithsonian Libraries' collections into your classroom. Use UNSTACKED as a morning exercise, a way to introduce a new topic, or to discover your students' interests. Picture your world, dive into the stacks! 

Smithsonian Libraries
10
 

Travel: Unstacked

UNSTACKED is a wonderful way to spark inquiry, analysis, and discussion. By visually exploring our images, you can bring the Smithsonian Libraries' collections into your classroom. Use UNSTACKED as a morning exercise, a way to introduce a new topic, or to discover your students' interests. Picture your world, dive into the stacks! 

Smithsonian Libraries
10
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